La Escala Humana

La Escala Humana

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00:04
nobody knew that the way we build cities had any influence on lifestyles and people's life that could be some theories about it but there was no knowledge and then I realized that a lot of basic knowledge was needed Perez's approach astaizzu philosophia al igual con esta la hermana L&R dora rincey tamanna samos medidas pero no tienen que ver con las medidas la protección see no más bien con la protección al caminar a low salar una
00:40
Ciudad a scintilla alum tender la al process Arliss okay crema says Jenner Arkell debate a nlk surgeon ideas y experiencias de otros los países en el caso del estudio de jangled son los responsable de lo que muchos ctoc AMA la stroget estación de la ciudad es lo que en copenhagen ciarán en el Ostrow gay Paseo de employ sunmo de los a seguir lo que muchas Jenner are esos analysis compare DeVos contrast our experiencias persuasion con el espacio
01:20
público con el paisaje CA Mo's condo empezamos Nellis to do a secret or say a knows no interest Abba any a polka track t de la moda hacer precios manu mentos martine take euro appreciation a nosotros queremos hacer algo distinto de ahora todo el mundo interests alone is no queremos hablando todos estos a es una philosophia que de repente hou popular it is so cheap to be sweet to people in City Benny compared to any other investments it cost next to
01:52
nothing so there are really perspectives because man is basically a very clever animal who knows what what he likes and who knows when he is on comforter imagine a science-fiction film when a cold distant urban landscape imagine that we live in that future right now the Mekas it is a reality and it looks a lot like the visions of science fiction
03:35
films through the 20th century gigas it is a soon-to-be in the midst of this cold bleak vision of the future we have the human being it doesn't fit the cliche of maternity it is personal warm intimate social in our search for opportunities money and a better life we move to the cities but does the way we built cities invite for human interaction inclusion and
04:30
intimacy what is the scale for measuring happiness in the city sometimes I would say that even today we know much more about a good habitat for mountain gorillas or Siberian tigers than we know about a good urban habitat for Homo sapiens understanding the nature and the attitude and aspiration of the people is the whistling definitely they're like the solution
05:22
so when is the question coming what is the definition of modernity what is the definition of being modern if you think about how he lived historically we lived in tribes and clans and extended householders from Bank villages big family groups and I guess our natural state is to be together with other people and as a very
06:01
very modern phenomenon that we suddenly live either in very tiny households but two three people are live completely alone the time around 1960 was quite an interesting period where the boom the economic boom and the Industrial Age in the Western countries really took off and a lot of people moved from the countryside to the cities and they were big housing shortage the modern is really expressed that this
07:01
was a big cut with everything of the past and the housing was conceived as a machine for living and the city was conceived as a machine for living actually the city was out if anybody at
07:33
any time wanted to pay professionals to make a city planning idea which would kill city life it could not have been done better than what the modern is accomplished when I was a kid so Henry is totally different at that time the economic situation is not that great people are poor so a lot of you who are worried
08:21
about their food this country was more about agriculture but things the last 30 years the opening to the door to the world and that the Chinese people are moving to the cities so the urbanization is the real challenge and also the speed is very fast the Bucheon is for economic perspective
09:04
but the the other on the other hand this post colleges for environment energy and people's livability all the people moving into the city has to be customized to the city life and they change their living styles also means the city is becoming bigger and bigger today we see the process of
09:48
urbanization most strongly in China where people undergoing the same modernization as the West but in less than a generation new housing developments are built on the fringes of the cities and people commute to work in the center the high-rise business districts drive the economy and have become the signature image of a modern Chinese city we were so excited to compete with all foreign countries whether you have a
10:28
taller building we have a even taller beauty so however after all these years sinking back and I think we made a lot of the same mistakes as the western countries has made this change also lost a lot of the older City characteristics such as diluting life such as the neighborhood the small neighborhood the neighborhood the
11:18
tightness even down the major streets the the shops are along the streets you don't travel very long traditional Chinese houses the hutong were arranged around courtyards and alleyways how does it affect us as people when a physical landscape changes when a social corridor a neighbourhood corner on occasional meeting place disappears
12:29
well our generation becomes richer and the we tend to appreciate the opportunity to owns a car have a car and to drive a car yes the consumption of cars and real estate is the main generator of growth worldwide it's a national Chinese policy to build roads and highways to maintain the high growth in the coming decade the number of vehicles is expected to double
13:28
fivefold they learn a lot from America we learn that leave Li the highways we leave the superblock so I think it's really important to think beyond just those modern stuff but really look at how those things about people and if this is the right thing to support n is people we're never heard ah never what is going on what on a four despite the disappearance of traditional
14:37
lifestyles big modern cities are successful growth engines which have moved 300 million Chinese out of poverty and into a living standard equal to Western countries in only 20 years most of these people live in cities it is estimated that another 300 million will reach this level of wealth in just a couple decades when the city becomes a bigger you're
15:20
biking becomes a to longer trip it doesn't fit anymore you have much more much greater pressure for your commuting because you're commuting such a long distance and take a much more time out of your day when they get home it's already dark after dinner you feel
15:49
so tired and nobody knows each other very well and I don't know my neighbor at all you could do more human-oriented planning you think from a people's and as you are a person what kind of life would you like to have in the 1960s Copenhagen went for the
16:52
same modernization as China today going to and from the residences was very boring through maybe green lawns or there was no activity no shops no nothing just you and the grass and the sky and there was a main critique of housing in the in the 60s and the big estates was that it was made so that you
17:27
have isolation perfectly you go out and water your plants in the garden and look up and down the street and there is nobody coming coming again nobody knew that the way we build cities had any influence on lifestyles and people's life that could be some theories about it but there was no knowledge and then I realized that a lot of basic knowledge was needed since the 1940s City Planning had been
18:00
structured around the more toka the traffic flow was documented systematically to improve the speed and efficiency of cars Yankee decided to develop a different set of data that could challenge the single-minded focus on traffic flow as a teacher at the School of Architecture he included his students and colleagues in the research it was super refreshing just to be at the one space a whole day early morning till the evening and actually see what people are doing there how long time are
18:33
they there why are they standing where are they walking and when you map it but at the same time you see how things evolve people's behavior patterns in public spaces became obvious when cars were pushed out of the main street of Copenhagen as more and more streets were pedestrianised over the years young gate studied how these changes influence people's behavior when more streets were pedestrianised he documented systematically how public
19:12
life multiplied the main shopping street became a walking street parking was pushed away from a major inner city harbor later the main square became a square so we found this predictability which we have known about the motorcar said if you make more roads you will have more traffic but now we also knew it about city life puppet life if you
19:46
have more space for people you will have more public life if we can have spaces where most of us feel invited so you're not in their space or they're coming in your space but you are in our space then we has this possibility of meeting across different layers of society different user groups different lifestyles and being urban has something to do with being able to cope in the meeting of
20:25
perfectly strangers somebody you don't know it's very obvious that in these cities where they have lost the public space they are by now generally very interested in refighting and we kindling the idea of public space what do we do when people are not coming out of their private homes anymore the in these cities life has been totally privatized you in 2007 the methods of studying people
21:44
and public life were taken to kneel like many other North American cities New York had focused entirely on traffic efficiency and built a gigantic system of highways that connected with suburban homes hours away Robert Moses in the 1950s brought an extraordinary amount of change to New York City and he built a lot of expressways roadways so moving quickly is certainly still a very strong part of the legacy that we have from
22:16
Robert Moses and thinking big is also a big part of that and if you're planning you know if you're if you're a Moses type planner you want to control that as much as possible and by controlling it you really sort of you know extinguish that possibility for life to pop up because you streamline things you separate functions you put um you separate work from from play from leisure and you think about it in a very concrete system that's an equilibrium but that's not what what makes place is fantastic
22:50
that's not what made the city great then or what is making it great now a hundred years ago or sixty years ago the car was new it held the promise for the future it seemed to be the way of progress now we've grown up we've seen what a fully built out automobile world is like and we see a lot of the negative side effects that people maybe could have appreciated we're going to happen 280 years ago but we're living in a world that's choked with traffic everywhere where we've made our own human living environment deadly for people I mean we've destroyed the human
23:23
living environment with all of this traffic and people see that and they also realize you can't build your way out of traffic they mean the I we've tried to plow highways through neighborhoods to double-deck highways to do everything that we could think of and we fail no this isn't good enough we've been resting on our laurels for so long so there was this desire to move beyond that paradigm of Moses and there's no question if you're a New Yorker you know that the city needs to change our city
24:09
has been outdated and our systems have been outdated and so this took a big picture of you and saying okay we're going to actually leverage this growth to our advantage by investing in our key infrastructure systems and and looking at that as a way to bring the city into a state of repair and a state of competitiveness that was you know me would make us the greatest greenest city in the world you know if you see pictures of Times Square before the
24:41
image of New York was always sort of fast-moving taxis through Times Square or people you know hailing a cab there was a very dominant I think kind of car culture of of New York City you know the traffic planners had become maybe the most powerful powerful people in the city the d-o-t had never measured pedestrian traffic you know they had never been only been counting cars they had no quantitative tools for measuring you know the
25:16
pedestrian experience so really you know there's an adage that is so true in the business world which is that you you care about what you measure they were simply maximizing the wrong thing so to refocus all of those engineers and planners you needed new quantitative tools and you needed to give them new benchmarks a new goal posts and that's what Yin helped us do get the baseline data set some targets now let's plan our street to meet them really our first task was to survey
25:49
streets and spaces and and monitor how people are walking how they're spending time in the streets what type of activities are engaging in where they're spending time their use patterns all sorts of data that basically didn't exist before the city had a lot of data about private vehicles but didn't have a lot of data about people 90% of the roadway in Times Square was allocated to cars and only 10% to people and yet 90% of the people who use the space were pedestrians and only 10% cars
26:29
so we needed to change the math what Time Square has no square a 89% of it isn't even a square that's that's very simple to understand and you know people can react to it and demand more no place to sit along Broadway everyone understands that that's that's a real shame so we were able to I think with some very simple very even maybe the now observations frame them you know in a political context that allowed everyone to say you know what the street is underperforming this is not worthy of a
27:07
world-class City the plane was to define a new way to move in the city Broadway would be closed for traffic along the major squares from uptown to downtown and a network of bike lanes would be built to connect with surrounding boroughs we're very opinionated in New York City so there were eight point four million opinions about what should be done we
27:55
don't need any bicycle lanes in New York City because it was more like white bicycle because people don't have time to ride bicycle Wonder to Friday American life is like machine any any type of the suggestion of change was met with resistance because it affected their everyday routine and I think what this change was spurred on by was more of an alignment a mechanism essentially I think that
28:53
mechanism was the pilot project process overnight essentially the the street was closed chairs put in tons of people used it there was this huge latent demand that existed the entire time that just swooped into this into this area but it wasn't quite good enough you know people are saying complaining you know this is cheap folding chairs from Costco that's not New York City that's not Times Square so not long after that they needed to revise their approach and get some better quality furniture the idea was
29:35
doing something and giving people a chance to experience it not doing the perfect thing and making it right from day one it's a shift from the one heroic vision to a more iterative evolution of what cities can become it's giving people just a little bit of a taste of like what their lives could be like every day of the year if simply the space were designed and managed for them and for their kids and for you know the neighborhood and I am so encouraged by the fact that
31:15
New York has 50 million visitors a year now and all of those visitors to our city are now seeing Times Square um you know bicycles everywhere and they're taking that back to Kansas City no they're taking that back you know to Minneapolis and and elsewhere and they're saying you know what my idea of a city has just been transformed my idea of the city street is now different than it was before and that's precisely what America needs right now because we have had this love affair with the automobile you know for a hundred years and you know the oils running out and you know
31:47
people want a different lifestyle you know at times where there was a snowball fight that took place completely spontaneous completely unplanned and it's not like I ever thought hey we're gonna reclaim space here and it's gonna be a snowball fight you know that maybe wildness you know of a city can really only happen when you have a critical mass of people living their lives in the public realm you know when everyone's shuttered indoors there's never there's no
32:29
vitality there's no spontaneity and it's a living thing you so it's a wellspring of human interaction that is always I think feeding us and you know what when you see it you know when you walk down the street you know in Copenhagen you can see that organic human quality that I think good cities have chungqing is like many but maybe especially one of the cities that is known by its skyline driving to chanting
33:45
the first time crossing one of the bridges to the downtown area overlooking the rivers seeing all the high-rises seeing all the neon lights is in many way what we expect and a dream of seeing in a Chinese city the downtown area of Chongqing is defined by a peninsula much like Manhattan here the roads follow the length of the peninsula rather than crossing a new plane for more effective pedestrian network to crisscross the
34:26
downtown area was developed this is a pilot project that aims to influence policymakers all over China one small route is implemented to show this approach firsthand we made a number of strategies or recommendations and one of the places we made a recommendation about of course what is called route three which is one pedestrian route in the inner city area we should consider maybe adding more benches because people still want to sit light it when you take some existing
35:03
spaces and we utilize them better will you make them inviting before walking for social interaction every little corner every little square metre between the buildings has been given new payment has been integrated in this new route and has been given importance for the local community so over there they took
35:40
the sidewalk through I actually thought they have done it here as well at one point we're creating a pedestrian route at one point this pedestrian route meets a road atheria or street atheria meaning it's an important traffic route in the city so the question is who do we prioritize and we convince the local planners that at this point this being part of a strategy to implement new pedestrian routes was very important that they prioritize pedestrians got a good see per crossing pull sidewalks
36:11
true to make it a nice and convenient for everyone young and old to walk in this area and they did this and they implemented it and this was done not six months ago but actually I thought the sidewalk had gone through here otherwise it hasn't changed her they changed it back yeah yesterday we learned that the traffic police and the traffic planning department hadn't gone in and removed the implementation again and to create a new road space but it's really bad the
36:42
day let's change back I still carry care about vehicles it's very important that we actually create examples showing that you can make a different choice then it can be attractive to make a choice where you don't have the car and that is still rare in a Chinese context the small-scale of the street is extremely important my wife and I started in Italy to
37:22
document very carefully by counting the people and seeing whether they were standing in the Sun or in the shade and what was going on in Italy and why was Italy famous for being such a nice place for people we always keep the old cities in 5-kilometer on our scale that means that when you move at five clemmy's an hour walking you can see the people you're sort of squeezed a little bit together and it's a very sensual and interesting
38:25
world you can see all the details there are colors and of smells acoustics which are very interesting if you go to a modern housing area it suddenly makes sense that much of the stuff in the suburbs are made so that the cars would be happy when going 60 kilometres an hour for doing 60 kilometer you need big spaces big signals big turning radius that's a completely different scale from the
39:10
scale of the walking man I think everybody would love to live with a garden in the house and I think that's a natural instinct but when it's the choice of how much that costs you and how much time you have to spend getting to work you might start to weigh that up so people will work out the economics of the city they'll work out that living in the suburbs is maybe not a good investment and what used to be our parents idea of investment will not
39:49
be ours I would have agreed with you three or four years ago but the Great Australian dream of a free-standing detached house with a front garden a large back garden with two cars in the garage was the universal aspiration of young people I have seen a shift in that view just this week we've had academics saying that creating these suburbs by just rolling out houses like a carpet is actually going to create ghettos of the future which will make people ill which
40:19
will have poorer health outcomes so we're building in a problem for ourselves not only obesity but social isolation and financial hardship all of those symptoms and are showing up on the edge of Australian capital cities can you change the city model if it was built for the car what I found in the 1980s was that Melbourne was in fact I almost no population living in the city and we were asked to write a strategy for change and all we did was listen to
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the people we just listen to what they were saying and realized that what the question we were being given was how do you make a 24-hour City but make it feel and look like Melbourne isn't life something organic that jumps up wherever we don't expect can you decide and plain a lively city can you change people's desires why walk when you can choose the
41:27
car why live in a small apartment where you can have a house and a garden Rob Adams discovered a hidden resource in the layout of the downtown grid which became key to attract life back to the city the laneways were the crappiest space you could think of in Melbourne earlier it was the the it felt unsafe it was the back side of buildings there you had all the air conditioners and dumpsters and
42:08
everything was in those phases and it was never ever thought about as a as a people space but at the same time they had this very nice human scale to them they were narrow they were in shadow which is nice in in most part of the year so by opening up the buildings and transforming the friendliness you could say of the environment it completely changed the life of the city and on the
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streets now became places where people want to stay so we started introducing cafe bars and we went from 2 in 1985 to over 500 today so people know us sit on the streets enjoy coffee and the streets have become our living room Melbourne has been consistent over the past 30 years in its policy to bring people back to live in the city centre in the future the population is expected to double but the city plan to
43:22
accommodate for this growth without needing to build more suburbs we have 3.6 billion people living in cities today 50% of the world's population that's gonna rise to 6.5 billion people by 2050 we're almost gonna have to double the urban capacity of our cities in 40 years are we as nimble as China well China is undergoing what is the world's greatest social experiment how do you move more than a billion people from the agrarian to an urban environment and that verben
43:58
environment is is not for all and and I see things they do very quickly but I also see things where I worry about what is the consequence of that in 20 or 30 years time so there is nothing to fear from growth there is from unplanned growth and if we start to address how we make people happy how we make our cities financially viable the only way is to look at cities very carefully and understand how they work we haven't got the time or money to build the
44:28
infrastructure we all need for the capacity we need in the next 50 years so we'll have to look at our city and start to think about how do you do more with less if you look back to tears from now the city was almost a city like madness unfortunately after the liberation war the government's policy became very very central to Raqqa and internal migration started very very highly nowadays is
45:19
almost crossing seven to eight percent every year then Raqqa started going so having that huge pressure if you could just control and conserve our potential resources this could be a wonderful city Dokka is the fastest growing city in the world half a million people moved here from the countryside every year to handle this pressure Duggan follows the urban model we have seen in China and
45:56
the West a model based on cars highways high-rise residential suburbs and a massive consumption of energy why we have to copy a Western world and just push it into a planning process this particular notion of living how we are addressing it how we are denying it how we are denying their aspiration is a sample how we are destroying the very flavor what this city could have a group of activists in dhaka have
46:51
translated young games books they have introduced his methods of counting pedestrians rickshaws and public life to inspire a different approach to planning I think it was the year 2005 when the common people saw that the the government is taking the initiative that they are the banning reaches from some Road so what is the reason they are there pointing out the rich' is one of
47:22
the main source of traffic congestion in haka in mid 400k then the banda ricksha now what we found now thus traffic congestion is still there and they just overlook the main issue the main problem was there the parking problem the cause without any furniture they they have the facility this private car companies they are just making the class and now this
47:57
is the zone to sell it so it is one of the policy they are giving loan may be the ADB may be the wall bank they are giving loan for making the roads for making the flyovers so they are making it it is their business area they are selling it they're giving us aid not it is not aid we have to pay back them and we are burdened with that loan so we shouldn't follow that model
48:35
so when the government is banning ricksha they are destroying the opportunities of employment and 300,000 pictures with 600,000 diction rulers they are the poor people so by this what they can do if they aren't something for today they will eat if they don't they don't only the five-person are using the private car 37% and using the rickshaw
49:08
if the 37% are shifted for using the private car so I think I can move anywhere I have to just sit in the car and what I don't know I have to sleep there and feed there and everything it's my car and I have the car and I have to do nothing that's it the policies and the planning when it comes from the top it never understand the very ass position of the people so when we are doing it you have encompassed only the rich people or
50:14
upper middle income people rest of the people who actually dominated in terms of number has been left out and the whole problem started growing because unfortunately if you don't encompass everybody into your planning and understanding of transportation housing you actually walking towards the cameras created by yourself because you have disregarded them but they are always there you can say there and along she didn't exist but they do exist
50:46
and the problem started from there how this modality should be prioritized who should be the new 10-year plan for improving duckin prioritizes highways and road infrastructure it is heavily funded by the World Bank the government will spend ten million dollars under destron facilities while the budget for flyovers will be 1 billion activist complained
51:36
that the plane is socially unfair unscathed a show host acrylic ask rotation showers like volleyball de una show Mom 9a everyone's ejaculated a cathartic she lasts until manager no protocol jacksepticeye a a raster limiter ho tape a taraji avocado alone is one karate cardiology la mia che che GU Nashua Cathy Ayala got a photo to predict a gigantic a tsuba de batalla auto to come on Lukey to our take a photo tell you Jenna put back with one girl Aschenbach
52:12
otter to eject evaluate amalgam that I did boshy boshy dude go tuna she nearly choked erosion on automatic caranavi cats got a chicken crossing it affects the charity eligible for additional signal show giving a body romanov amethyst television I think maybe Kalevala leg
52:46
I'm gonna put you on brilliant use my videos challenge old buddy internet was born what you want if that was to look up at 17 a family a house Majority MA but it's nice at the current growth rate the population is expected to double from 160 million people today to more than 300 in just a few decades with this constant ik w print if each person had the one car like America will have a 300
53:33
million car will there be any space in Bangladesh so I'm someplace that I become mad I not met but I feel very uneasy we are thinking I don't know how I can explain you you see some time I can sleep night night properly only think that what we are eating if all the foodstuffs are already easy with the dough toxic
54:17
chemical in etc but other problems is becoming our more and more prone permanent target is considered a high risk earthquake zone the urban development magnifies this problem heavy the land mass is fast being covered with asphalt and concrete which causes rain water to flow into the polluted river system the groundwater is therefore the only resource and it is depleting
54:51
quickly last year a small earthquake and magnitude 5.4 hit the city in the case of a major earthquake it is estimated that eighty thousand high-rise buildings will collapse there is a connectivity soil structure is changing as a result even a minor earthquake can become the more fitnah more problem you see that one structure the soil condition is changed then bearing capacity goodness
55:30
something I cannot firstly because I see that if if are quite with six magnitude much of the bimini will not survive this thesis we have certain conditions learning a kid walking through the road and around your house what he sees this is wrong trees getting out of the state's growing the CSX small butterflies
56:32
to see life you see how it goes then when you go off we will take care of lives of others it's not school it's not a book it is the timeframe of your life you learn so when we make us run a city into a place where you don't want your kids someone you are raising generations when they grow up they will be not human if we see like it's a bridge I think we
57:13
can see what is what is end of this bridge because our destination is the Western modern world now we have started the journey now we are in the middle of the bridge we can see oh my god these capitals stick model all these modern things all this cause all these highways destroyed their life now I can set up my journey okay which way I can go we count
57:48
we measure calculate and maximize but if we count the four billion people living in third-world countries and what will happen when they drive a car pollute and consume the amount of energy that we do but if we started all over imagine waking up and being attacked by someone with a large piece of wood I mean you didn't know what was happening the power was out the noise was incredible you could not stand you could not find anything you had no sense of bearings
59:07
the room was strewn with books and things that had fallen over and this was happening for maybe half a million people in 2011 Christchurch New Zealand underwent a devastating earthquake the inner city suffered the worst damage and most casualties there happened in high-rise buildings yes the immediate response you know after the earthquake has build up back as it was before just make it say you know distributed and again there's a
59:54
there's a lot of research about cities after disasters and and and what happens after a disaster is your quality of life is destroyed I mean it's it's really it's much less than it was before the quake and you kind of have a choice really that you can try and just get back up to where you are but the international evidence suggests that what you want to do is try and improve the quality of life beyond where you were before to try and make up some of that lost kind of ground now we've got five years of kind of hardship and and
01:00:25
and and they're in the aisle but but but if we can make Christchurch a better place maybe that'll help us kind of regain some of that um some of the you know the lost quality of life the lost stone yeah the damage to our physical environment the center of Christchurch is named the red zone and the public is not allowed to access the area the structural damage to the building still standing is so great that the entire city has to be demolished it is
01:00:58
estimated that up to 1500 buildings will be torn down before rebuilding begins I remember the first time came to Christchurch the city wasn't shocked I guess they needed a kind of therapy to talk about everything they've been through but how do you start how'd you start rebuilding a city from scratch almost our central city and I guess the big thing was you had to be inclusive out to be everybody's project this presentation please welcome back to
01:01:39
Christchurch David sim I've heard a lot about remarks this morning about these foreign experts are coming and telling you what to do I can promise you I'm not gonna tell you anything that you have to do my job I'm here to listen I want to find out what you want to do and I want to run everything I can do with my team to help you do that so what kind of city do you want and everybody has something to share and so the idea of a program that would reach out to everybody in the
01:02:13
city in which we could get their ideas together and help us understand what it was that our people wanted going forward because the adversity of the distraction was the opportunity of rebuilding a new future we called it share an idea obviously we need new rules but it's about the spaces between the buildings although I think got a huge opportunity see the spaces between the lines of mental vision we thought of it like a movement if you like them where we invited people to share an idea about what they how they thought
01:02:44
Christchurch should be and we ended up with one hundred and six thousand ideas you know about what Christchurch should be like we employed maybe a hundred people to sit down and type in all of this information came in online and came on bits of paper posters and out popped all of the keywords that people were focusing on they wanted a low-rise city much like many of the older European cities they wanted spaces that they could relate to they wanted cycleways
01:03:21
they wanted more Gardens they wanted a smaller retail area not one that was spread out they wanted effectively a city for people the people of the city without being told what to think came together and their ideas were really identical to so much of the work that yarn had been doing around the world it's really proving in a sense that the things that we want when we are people as opposed to really thinkers corporations are
01:03:59
actually very very common we mean a section in the plant we showed that you actually have quite tall office building six seven storeys and still have the tower of the Cathedral standing proud above all of that I mean if you imagine the Cathedral the tallest spire in the middle of all of this it could be a fantastic composition if you imagine well this is like before like the normal signs of a city you know cars buses people talking children
01:04:38
laughing and screaming it's kind of is really weird this islands on the fight you could hear birds singing I'm nothing like no shouldn't be like that let's shoot I just know why where do they go from here I think if you're a historian you can talk about this English style or this Victorian style I think for Agra people
01:05:23
the buildings have are much more important value which is about memory like that was the coffee where I used to go on Saturdays with my granny past the shop we are I bought those shoes that's where my hairdresser was this is where I met my girlfriend I was standing on the corner there I saw for the first time there and just two doors time we had our first cup of coffee those kind of stories are much more interesting because they touches emotionally what's
01:05:54
great about cities as they're full of these stories overlapping stories overlapping memories I mean such Liam misses very moving when you read some of these like why are we doing nothing to save what's left of our heritage building what of our past will we leave for our future I think people are feeling all of the memories are gonna be gone as well and I think that's a really obscene what we have seen the city it's
01:06:23
not just bricks and mortar and I guess that's kind of coming through in all of this because I mean this is about it's about love I mean this is hard and this but people little heart-shaped because people love their city I guess they won't back or they wonder lose some of the bike the plane for Christchurch has become a big pedal land owners and developers fight the regulations against high-rise office buildings the public insists on a
01:07:01
low-rise city with a lively public center where residents and businesses can coexist the large majority of people want low-rise buildings when we did the economic feasibility study which takes time yeah interestingly and Fang you know six storeys when you look at the return on though you know and so the building costs versus you know the likely kind of rental the best return was about six storeys so about six storeys you've got to have greater foundation depth you've got to have stronger structures within the building so you kind of feel there's a kind of threshold above that we're actually the
01:07:32
costs you know go up much more than the return so you have to pull a lot higher than that to come up we know to balance you know to get as good a rate of return the big problem with tall buildings is interesting because there's loads of research on this you can ask a surgeon or you can ask a district nurse what is the foundation of health and we'll see more or less the same thing fresh air exercise meet people and the higher you are in a building the less likely article in and out spontaneously so it
01:08:12
means the people in the building's have more boring lives and you have much less life on the streets so this thing about getting out moving about meeting people is really really vital and so I wanted to find a tool wave communicating what cities are about and I wanted to find a simple way of talking about it and why discovered was if you give up with a few pieces of labels in front of people
01:08:42
people immediately start playing with them I guess I was a Lego kid I played a lot with Lego as a child and you can discuss how dangerous Lego is as in terms of I kind of like you are kind of like the God in the world of Lego and you build things from above and it's kind of helicopter perspective that can be very dangerous visit if you can start building things because you can without thinking what is it you really need
01:09:15
welcome to the Lego workshop we're doing three different tasks the first one is to build yourself then think about the kind of things you like doing the city and then build a model of the place you'd like to see in the central city okay and a way through these small small scenarios you start building up pictures of what the city could be like and I can think of something which beer really cooks if you imagine we were just inside the buildings we could be looking down
01:09:46
all this activity and though it may make us want to come outside me part of it this could be a starting point for talking about all these very complex city issues that we're trying to approach because he started thinking about who's the environment for who are we working for it's it's is for people on April 18th 2012 the responsibility for rebuilding Christchurch was taken
01:10:20
away from the City Council and placed in a new unit led by the national government the government promised to respect the overall vision for the city the greatest strengths that you have when I'm faced for example with central government or from a business community some of whom who may say no no no we don't want these rules I've got the ideas and the vision of my people here are you going to ignore that the City Council developed a legal framework
01:10:50
called the second volume this described restrictions on high-rise buildings and rules against parking this volume was discarded by the government we've decided to accept Volume one but in the meantime put volume two aside for a period because it will be premature I think to accept those rules and would be most appropriate to review those rules as the blueprint is developed over the next 100 days the dilemma is difficult
01:11:21
the enormous rebuild will provide a massive boost to the economy if it attracts fast investments from developers international hotels and corporations but profit is short-term so is political decision making with elections every four years but cities are built to standard hundred or thousand years it seems like you add a tipping point right now between becoming la or becoming Copenhagen very much thing yeah yeah
01:11:53
yes and and while you know I'd like to you know pretend that I'm in control of that I'm not fair yeah there are much they're a big economic you know forces at play really which will shape if you throw the city and the behavior people so there's a lot of talk about the future city of Christchurch and it's very exciting and yes it will be green and psycho friendly lalala and I find it very exciting but my kind of question is well what's going to happen now because a people just going to wait for this
01:12:36
future city to be built I think I think people need things to do now people need to feel like something is happening gap-filler provides a way for something to happen now you get life in a city by not trying to plan for everything by allowing things to happen organically where possible life comes when you give people a chance to contribute something and I think that it proves that people need spaces to come and come and do that
01:13:12
kind of thing to just come and dance I guess there is this very difficult tradition of which comes from the way we teach architecture and planning the idea that one person can solve everything oh we even have this term the master plan like I'm gonna do the master plan but you'll answer all questions and of course we know is it possible cities are unbelievably complex so even the idea of a master plan is really crazy all we can
01:14:10
do make is enter a framework we can make a very robust framework which allows life to take place one thing I can be sure about in 10 years and 20 years and 50 years hundred years human beings will be more or less the same size our senses will work more or less the same way we will probably enjoy meeting each other and the same way we enjoy meeting each other today I may just as happy about
01:14:41
handshakes and hugs I'm flirting glimpses I don't believe we can plan for things I don't need by me drawing a line I can make things happen I can't force anybody to do anything for be anyone but we can make invitations we can invite people to walk we can invite people to sit to stay invitations to
01:15:14
a better everyday a better way to cross the street a better way to wait for the bus a better way to live your life that's all we can do 200 years ago the world had 1 billion people today we're 7 billion by the end of this century we will be 10 we estimate that 80% of us will live in cities by then how we live in a city
01:15:51
look a hundred years from now as I see the scenery City Planning has been going on quite a number of years when a rather incomplete toolbox it is so cheap to be sweet to people in City Planning compared to any other investments it costs next to nothing so there are really perspectives because man is basically a very clever animal
01:16:27
who knows what what he likes and who knows when he is on comforter you you

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