04 The Nuke Interface

04 The Nuke Interface

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Language: English

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00:01
hello there and welcome back it's time to hop into nuke and go over one of the most exciting videos in this entire workshop the nuke user interface now when you first load up nuke this is what your default layout will look like it brings to the front the three most important panels that you'll be using and those are the viewer the properties panel and the node graph panel so a quick overview because i don't want to spend too long on this but the node graph is where we're going to be building our node trees and where we can visualize the flow of data
00:32
the properties panel will contain specific controls for the nodes in our node graph and we'll be able to see the results of these controls in the viewer the viewer allows us to see the output of a given node now let's start making our first node tree so we can see these panels in action so there's really three main ways of creating nodes in nuke and i'll show them to you starting with the slowest and moving on to the fastest so the slowest way is to use this node browser over here this has every
01:04
single node you could want to use in nuke and every single node that you currently have installed so we're gonna make a checkerboard right here so we're gonna go to the image tab and then hit checkerboard and there's our node you'll notice that on node creation we immediately got a properties panel tab that has a name that's one to one with the created node and i just zoomed in here zooming in in your node graph is using your middle mouse wheel to scroll and clicking and holding your middle
01:35
mouse wheel is how you move around and so checkerboard one checkerboard one these correspond with each other always so if we were to change this to this is the one all right this updated once we entered that name so we can't really control anything of this checkerboard within the node graph the only thing we can really do is turn it off and on which we'll look at once we're viewing our node all of the adjustable controls live within this property panel
02:06
so that's one way to make a node let's delete this just hit delete there that gets rid of it and now let's make a checkerboard in a faster way so when you're in your node graph make sure you click around just so this is the context we're in hit tab so tab opens a search bar where you can look for any node that new currently has loaded so in this instance checkerboard's already loaded because i recently searched for it but just type in checkerboard have it selected and hit enter alright we just made a
02:39
brand new checkerboard node using this tab menu when you're first starting can be a little intimidating because it requires you to know the name of the node it's okay if at first you don't know the name of the nodes and you don't really use the tab browser over time you'll get to know them and really that left window over there is a great way to just see what nodes exist in nuke so i highly recommend you click through them and just see what the different nodes do and then once you start feeling comfortable you'll be in this tab menu constantly i don't think i ever use this in my
03:10
day-to-day work so then the next way we can make nodes is you'll notice when you're clicking through there are shortcuts to make specific nodes in here and that is by far the fastest way a lot of these don't have shortcuts the checkerboard for instance doesn't but say we wanted to add a color correct node we would just hit c and now we've made a color correct node using a shortcut if we go to the node browser on the left here and look at our color correct and you'll notice that it has c as a shortcut so that's a good way to figure
03:41
out what the shortcuts are for some very commonly used nodes so let's actually get to viewing all these nodes that we've made so the viewer itself actually is a node and it has an input here all nodes that can accept data into them have this little arrow at the top you see it on our viewer here and you also see it on our color correct node our checkerboard can't take data into it so there's no arrow at the top so to connect our checkerboard to our viewer there's a couple different ways we can do it
04:12
the first is we grab this input and connect it here and voila there we are here's our checkerboard we navigate the viewer panel the same way that we navigate the node graph you click and drag with the middle mouse button and you scroll in and out to get closer now if you want to just fit this to your screen hit h no matter where you are they'll always center you and bring you back to your home format so that's one way you can connect it another way is you could actually grab the output
04:43
of this node you'll notice that the checkerboard and the color corrects here have outputs and you can connect that to the viewer i very rarely see people use this output arrow but if you like it go ahead it's just another way of working so there's one more way to connect nodes except this one is for your viewer only if you want to connect this node to your viewer just have it selected and hit one now whatever we had picked is gonna jump to our viewer if we select this color correct there's no actual image flowing through
05:14
it the color correct doesn't make images but instead it adjusts them that's why our image is currently black so let's go back to our checkerboard by selecting it and hitting one so if we double click here it'll bring the checkerboard properties to the top and we can actually see the modifications to the controls that we do now so if we change the size of the squares here you'll see it live update within our viewer all of these parameters can only be controlled within this properties tab there's no control that you have over
05:45
nodes aside from turning them off and on in the node graph and you do that by hitting d d stands for disabled and that's just a quick shortcut to turn things off and on if you go into the node panel here which every single node has you'll notice that when we hit d we're actually turning on the disable here again you very rarely ever go in here to manually disable a node the only time you're in here is if you're adding expressions which we'll go over later i'm always hitting the d key in order to
06:17
turn things off so now we have a checkerboard here and we have a color correct but if i change the color correct properties and again double click it to have it go to the top nothing's happening and that's because our viewer is not connected in any way to our color correct so let's connect it here well we see again nothing has changed and that's because we essentially have two flows of data here and the one that is connected to our
06:47
viewer does not involve our color correct all our viewer is doing is looking at our checkerboard node so let's connect it here to our color correct and you'll immediately see it gets brighter so now we can modify our color correct properties here and they will directly affect our viewer and if we were to turn this off it's just our normal checkerboard so in general when you're making nodes
07:18
the flow should always be straight down you never ever ever want to build nodes that flow up sideways is occasionally acceptable but up is never good the industry standard is a downward flowing node tree so you can clearly see the flow of data another way to use the viewer say you want to a b very quickly between our base checker board and this color correct now you could quickly do that by just
07:48
turning it off and on but say this was a stack of nodes say we had also a blur on top of it now let's make a blur by hitting the tab menu and typing blur we'll just select that there all right we have our blur node and you'll notice when we had a node selected it immediately created this node in line with it if nothing was selected here and i hit tab and typed blur it would just be off to the side not doing anything
08:20
so let's delete this let's grab our blur and blur it out okay beautiful now let's set up our viewer so we can quickly a b the original checker board with our color corrected and blurred version we can hit one to connect this to our viewer's first input and then we can actually hit 2 with our blur 1 selected and this makes another input for our viewer if we have our viewer selected you can see that the second input is lit up
08:51
this indicates that we're looking through the viewer's second input but if we hit one it switches back to our first input now flipping back and forth is a very helpful way of a being but there's another way that's even better we can use the wipe tool so the wipe tool is in the viewer and if you hit wipe right here it's going to a b what we have here in a and what we have in b so if you click on b you'll see they're both connected to our first viewer input right now
09:23
and that's not what we want so let's hit blur you'll see on the right side of screen we've actually loaded our second input now you can grab this widget to modify your wipe you can rotate it you can change the opacity there's a lot of different things you can do here but this tool is very useful for a being your final result with the footage you can also hit w to turn it off and on as a shortcut so let's look into bringing in some actual footage and how to play it back
09:54
so let's delete all of the nodes we've made by shift dragging letting go and hitting delete so let's bring some footage into nuke the way you bring footage into nuke is through a node called the read node the read node is the most important node in nuke because it's how you get any images any movie files any elements at all that are pictures into nuke and there are three different ways of creating read nodes the first and the slowest
10:24
is going up here to our image tab and then hitting read so this will open nuke's file browser i have now navigated to where my footage is located i will select it and then hit open now this brings in a read node so let's view it with our viewer by selecting it and hitting one and here it is we'll just fit this to our screen hitting h and hit play in our viewer and there it is we have successfully
11:00
brought footage into nuke that is the slowest way of bringing footage in let's just delete this really quick and bring in it again now you can type read here it'll open up the same window anytime you make a read node this window is going to pop up and ask you what footage to bring in so you can use the tab menu we know how to do that and the shortcut is r this is the most common way i do it because again it's just so much
11:32
faster and once again we have our footage in you can also use the windows explorer window if you wish if we wanted to bring both of these in we could select both of them and drag them in and they would come in as separate read notes this is the same one that we have here we'll hit two and this is our second piece of footage so to briefly summarize you can bring in read nodes by using the panel on the left by hitting r in the node graph or by dragging and
12:04
dropping from the windows explorer and if you need to bring in multiple pieces of footage you can also do that with nukes file explorer let's hit r and that'll bring up our explorer and select our footage one then hit next then we'll select our footage o2 and then we'll hit open and that brings in both of our read nodes i'm just going to delete this one for now because we don't really need it and within our viewer window we have our playback controls right here
12:35
so let's just hit play so right now nuke is caching and the cache is represented by this yellow bar here it basically means that whatever is in yellow is ready to be played back at full speed this isn't as important here since all we're doing is looking at footage but in heavier comps it's essential now let's take a look at some of the read nodes properties so over here we have file path if we ever wanted to change what image we're viewing you could click here and select a
13:07
different one all right this has loaded our footage to element and i'm just clicking and scrubbing here and you can see it's caching individual frames when i stay on it long enough for the program to think about it so we have our new footage here we have our format size this tells us the resolution of our footage and within the viewer we can actually see it here as well this bottom number is our format size while this top number is our bounding box size
13:37
these are two very different concepts within nuke and can briefly be summarized as the format is what our final image output will be and the bounding box is all the data that nuke is calculating we'll go into more detail into this next week but it is important to know that there is a difference between these two numbers but for now just know that this bottom number would be the final resolution if you were to render your image at that point in the node tree next up in our read node property options
14:07
are the proxy knobs now proxies are basically low res placeholders for your high res clips it's something that enables very heavy comps to work more smoothly and efficiently proxies are very important when we're setting up heavy cg scenes and we'll take a look at how to use them later next are our frame settings so the frame range and original range right now they're displaying the same thing they're saying the first frame within this mov file is frame one and our last frame is frame
14:38
178 and it's also telling us what to do once we reach beyond this frame range so right now we're going from 1 to 178 and what we're doing is we're freeze framing if we go before frame one so let's just grab our viewer here all right we're negative 50 right now and it's just a frame hold of the first frame if we were to change this to black the screen will be black until we hit frame one now there are a couple of other options you can pick
15:09
we have loop which will just loop the clip forever and we have bounce which is like loop but it plays it forwards and then backwards and then repeats so this will just play back and forth infinitely before frame one but after frame 178 it's still set to hold i'm just going to keep this to hold for now that's a pretty good default and i don't really ever change this the original range and frame range will by default be the same coming into nuke but you can change this so you're only loading a portion of the frames this is
15:40
particularly helpful if you have a lengthy image sequence but you don't want to load all the frames the original range is saying here's the entirety of my clip but in this case let's just say i only want to go to frame 100 after frame 100 it's going to hold our image go back to 178. this frame mode setting here represents a couple of different ways that we can time offset our footage expression is basically saying hey whatever frame i'm on in nuke load that frame of my file so right now we're on frame 100 in nuke
16:14
and you can go to the metadata panel to look at the actual frame that's being displayed and you'll find that we're at frame 100 that's how the expression mode works when there's nothing in there you can also put nuke expressions in that blank spot but we're not going to cover that right now you could also change the start app let's go to frame 10 to see an example of this so we can say okay we want frame 1 to start at frame 10. so now you can see our clip is offset 10 frames and we'll just play 10 frames later you can also change the
16:46
offset which is kind of the opposite of the start at this is how many frames in negative space you're moving your footage you can also go into the dope sheet which normally displays keyframes but for read nodes and time offset nodes it'll actually display a timeline of sorts you can click and drag the clip to move it around almost like it's a non-linear editor by doing that it'll actually change your offset value now having your offset value at zero is actually the exact same thing as being set to expression with a blank
17:18
input now the next knob we have coming up is the missing frames knob so missing frames is if you have an image sequence and say a frame is missing for any reason this option is what nuke will do when it gets to that missing frame error means it'll show an error at the top of your viewport black will display an empty frame nearest frame will show the nearest frame and checkerboard will show a checkerboard in general error or checkerboard is the way to go because then it'll be very obvious when
17:50
files are missing if your image sequence is of something that's very tiny in the background and you just select blank or nearest frame it may be hard to tell that there's an actual error the next settings we have are the color space pre-multiplication and alpha options these are a little more complicated so we're going to hold off on talking about them for right now and break them down in later weeks and these options i never touch them and you probably won't need to either they're more detailed
18:20
options for using your quicktime files but again i never use them so i don't think they're very important to know about and there we have it those are the basics of using the nuke interface and reading and playing footage now that we have this fundamental step out of the way we can move on and start doing some actual compositing thank you for listening and i'll catch you in the next one

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