Warum illegale Streamingseiten (leider) Gutes bewirkt haben

Warum illegale Streamingseiten (leider) Gutes bewirkt haben

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00:00
(Jujutsu Kaisen episode 1) This is the first episode of Jujutsu Kaisen. The Anime of the Year, awarded by Crunchyroll, one of the largest legal on-demand platforms for anime streaming. And that is a made-up chat message from a supposed Jenny, because there are hundreds of websites that publish pirated anime and place advertisements on them, among other things , of course, this series can be found entirely in German. “This harms the industry, especially the creators of the works. And the publishers and streaming services buy very, very expensive licenses (...). ”In this video, we do not want to deny that illegal copies of anime series do not bring any financial benefits to the industry or to streaming services . However, it is good to understand what has to change fundamentally in this industry and why illegal streaming sites have not only done bad things in recent years. If you stream content illegally, you never really have to face any legal consequences. Only the operators of copyright-infringing websites are tracked, but this could change in the future
01:08
if the IP addresses were saved, for example. And yet, the site 9Anime receives over 100 million views per month. An illegal streaming website that has definitely overtaken Crunchyroll with almost 76 million views. But why is it like that? I wrote to Razovy to answer this question. He runs an English-language YouTube channel that deals with the anime and manga world and often publishes reviews of individual anime websites. Personally, I think there are two main reasons why people illegally watch anime. I think the first reason is the most obvious, and that's because a lot of people just don't have the money to subscribe to anime. We always think, especially in the West, that people have disposable income to pay for such things. But what a lot of people don't really realize is that anime has become a worldwide phenomenon these days and a lot of people all over the world, ignoring the West , just don't have the money to subscribe to anime. Entertainment like anime is quite a luxury in poorer areas, but
02:10
demand has increased enormously in recent years, which has not always been the case ... Anime was a "niche hobby", especially in the West, and I remember the days as a "fan" -Subbing "was a thing because no big brands translated anime. And nowadays they pirate an anime from Crunchyroll and distribute it to the anime community and some websites. If there weren't any huge, free websites like KissAnime, 9Anime, GogoAnime, the popularity of anime itself, the medium, would never have increased, no chance. If someone likes an anime, they might buy the physical manga, or a character, or a poster, or ... a keychain. Something like that. Physical merchandise can't be copied illegally, so keep buying it. And these animes get so much attention that people want to buy things from them. And you can see that ... because the demand has quintupled since 2010, in Japan alone. And for the North American market, too, sales are forecast to double by 2027.
03:11
From $ 23 billion to $ 41 billion. The anime community around the world is growing steadily. In the West, you would have the money to pay for a subscription ... Why don't most of them do it anyway? Well, if we focus on the West, I think the answer will be easy because the catalogs on legal anime streaming sites, basically the collections of the anime, are incredibly small. And because of that, you don't care about the legal options because you can watch anything you want on illegal sites. The choice is huge on illegal sites. Almost every anime, no matter how unknown, can be found there and that is of course due to the fact that the operators do not have to pay attention to exclusive licenses because they do not even have a license. You can always hear the anime YouTubers talking about how they have numerous subscriptions to various anime streaming websites and that is of course due to exclusive licenses. As I said earlier, because legal streaming websites don't have a large library, people tend
04:15
to use anime piracy. And personally, I think that you can't really blame them for that. These websites would benefit greatly from a pay-per-view model. Every time you want to watch an anime, you pay a small amount of money to your legal anime provider, which allows them to buy the rights from the anime studio. And yet, compared to the unlimited large libraries of 9Anime, with legal ones like Crunchyroll or Funimation and even through the integration of a pay-per-view model or something like that, the legal pages would still lose every time. In my opinion, the legal sites are becoming so popular because they constantly spread the message , "we are helping the anime industry and if you pirate things you are doing it wrong and you are not helping ". Legal providers advertise with this motto and it works. Many people end up subscribing to the streaming service by doing this ... It's not like it's bad business practice, it works perfectly well, but it's not morally correct, so to speak.
05:17
But it works, that's why these websites are growing so fast. It doesn't matter what they offer because what they offer is incredibly limited. There are simply too many legal providers who want to secure shares and rights to certain series. There is no uniform platform on which most animes are available, but each service buys different rights and, increasingly, exclusively. The question is, what would have to change in order for people to pay for anime again ... The answer is actually easier than you might think. Legal anime streaming websites are trying to keep the new shows going. This leads to them investing a lot of money in licensing, although not adding every anime to the library, it would be worth it. If these websites want to continue on a subscription model, I would strongly advise them to stop basing themselves on what works in Japan because the Japanese market is very different from the western market when it comes to anime. I would actually like websites like "AniList" and illegal sites to check which shows are really popular and only license them
06:17
after four or five episodes have aired, for example. Personally, though, I think this whole subscription model idea is stupid to start with. This model works for streaming websites like Netflix, but that's because their collection is incredibly large. But that's not the case for Crunchyroll, for example , because their library is incredibly small. I would offer a freemium model instead. You show advertisements everywhere, which is of course annoying, but at least it generates sales. You no longer buy unnecessary anime licenses and offer a subscription for those who want to get rid of the advertising and maybe other ancillary services that you add to the website or something. This model would work because it is already in use on illegal sites and it is really amazing how much money is generated behind illegal websites. A video on YouTube showed an estimate for an anime streaming website called "kissanime" at $ 1.5 million per month, including advertising revenue and premium offers.
07:18
Why this freemium model has not yet been legally implemented remains a mystery. If the anime piracy model works this well, will more and more people be streaming on illegal sites? Absolutely not, the legal streaming websites will win 100%. Well, big illegal anime streaming websites will survive anything. They make a lot of money on advertising that they can support these databases for a long time and still get to live a great life with the money they make. They will continue to exist. However, in the last year alone, I have had an incredible number of smaller anime websites that have been closed, and most of the time this has been voluntary. They can no longer compete with the legal and major anime websites so they just have to shut down. Well, I'm predicting, of course it's a guess, I'm not 100% sure. I am saying that in 20 years' time almost every illegal anime streaming website will be gone and that legal sites will basically be the only way to watch anime.
08:19
But what I don't like about the thought that we will have a Crunchyroll subscription in probably 20 years, for example , is that Chrunchyroll knows that. They know they don't need to improve. They don't need to improve their services, they don't need to improve their business practices because they know and in a few years they will be the winner. Also, keep in mind that legal streaming sites like Crunchyroll don't directly pay the hard working people who produce these shows. They don't. You only pay for the licensing. And the money goes straight into the pockets of people in the anime industry who are already making insane hourly wages to start with. It's not that you're actually helping the people who need it the most, you're just helping the other people who already have enough money to start. The average annual income of 759 anime artists was calculated to be around $ 20,000 per year, which is only $ 3,000 above the poverty line in Japan at $ 17,000.
09:22
So it is not only a practical question of whether and when large legal providers decide to introduce another subscription method such as the pay-per-view model or a freemium offer, but also a moral question of whether there is one at all It makes a significant difference whether you stream illegally or legally, because ultimately the working animator has to pay if he is not paid the money that he actually deserved, as big legal companies put it in their own pockets.

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