5 Historical Weapons That Look Like Fantasy

5 Historical Weapons That Look Like Fantasy

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00:00
usually you can expect swords and other weapons from history to be practical in nature they were designed for use after all but every now and then you come upon something that looks as if it came straight from a movie or video game or some other fantasy scenario in fact some of them if i looked at them without knowing that they're real i would call them unrealistic so let's take a look at a few examples there's plenty i just picked five for this to narrow down and for this video i got audible as a
00:31
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01:01
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01:32
trial let's start with something that i don't think many people know which is the antler-matic this is a tool which appeared in the mesolithic period started around 12 000 years ago in europe around roughly the same time that the neolithic started in the levant in the middle east and it lasted until around 8 000 years ago with some regional variation so this seems to have replaced a plow stick and it could be used either for agriculture or mining and experimental
02:03
archaeologists have even demonstrated that an antler axe can be used for chopping trees antler is surprisingly hard i've worked with it before i've included this even though it's a tool because skeletal evidence shows that it was used as a weapon like a war pick basically there are round holes punched into skulls with these and if you think about it this would be very effective for the same reason that a war pick is effective it concentrates
02:34
a lot of force on a relatively small area and it's a weapon that has most of its mass at the top so you can deliver very powerful strikes with it you know just like with a sickle the one i reviewed for example that was extremely effective any kind of pick like object that i've tested so far has been devastating so i'm not surprised that these punched holes clean into heads at the same time this is something you might expect to see in the hands of a lizard man or a tribal barbarian in a fantasy
03:07
setting it's a very unique item simple but it has a certain raw savage appeal if you will next up something remarkably fancy crystal weapons these were found in the megalithic tomb dolmen del montel rio in spain this is a 5 000 year old burial site with 25 arrowheads a few small blades a blade core that they were struck from and a dagger this is made of rock crystal
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a type of macrocrystalline quartz this might have been used as a result of flint shortage in the region or perhaps it has symbolic value i mean we still find these quite impressive to look at nowadays and i would be highly surprised if people did not consider them to be valuable or at least pretty back in the day this is significantly more challenging to work with than flint or obsidian artifacts made of quartz and rock crystal appeared relatively often in southern spain five to six thousand
04:08
years ago but then disappeared a millennium later in the early bronze age the most impressive piece here is obviously the crystal dagger this one is 21.4 centimeters or eight and three quarter inches long 13 millimeters or half an inch thick and the surface of the blade is polished the internal structure of the crystal does not allow breaking off a slab through percussion so this shows that it was probably shaped either through sawing or grinding and polishing
04:39
and then the edge was created by pressure flaking so this is remarkable work doesn't look quite like fantasy crystal daggers that you usually see and i really have to doubt its usability i think this would probably be quite brittle i suppose it could be almost like a one-time use item if somebody was stabbed by one of these the blade would most likely shatter if it hits bone with some force but if it's just soft tissue then it
05:10
might not or perhaps small pieces break off which could be even worse difficult to treat especially at the time and wouldn't heal very very easily either then we've got a 19th century spanish sabre apparently used against french cavalry it's double edged with a fairly wide fuller 91 centimeters or 36 inches overall length and it's speculated that it was supposed to cut the horse's tendons this is just a crazy design if i saw
05:43
this thing i would and it was a drawing i would just be like come on but it existed i imagine it would be a little cumbersome to wield might also have a somewhat awkward balance compared to a lot of other sabers but as far as cutting horses tendons is concerned i mean it's a bit sickle like at the end although i doubt you could easily use it as a sickle because it's an asymmetrical handle and it occurs in the opposite direction
06:14
so i mean you could potentially do a false edge cut with it but i imagine you could also use the straight section of true edge that is almost at a perpendicular angle to the blade so striking with that might be quite effective that would have an almost ax like effect i'm a little surprised that it even has a point because it does not look like it could be deployed at all it's at a very strange angle so i think that would be a little
06:44
difficult unless it was intended to deliver slashing cuts with the point but again you could only really do that effectively with a false edge cut so i don't know exactly how this was used it's just speculation i wasn't able to find a lot of information about it unfortunately and it's interesting to see that it has a sheath as well this cannot have been easy to make yet they went through the trouble of doing it anyway i don't know if this
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is a one-of-a-kind piece or if multiple similar ones were found this is the only one that i could find pictures of either way absolutely crazy design isn't it this looks very fantasy indeed the next one you might have heard of the zulfiqar it's a sort of mystical sword supposedly owned by the prophet muhammad and given to his son-in-law ali ibn abu talib this was first mentioned around the year 800 but then
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more commonly showed up in texts about 600 years after ali's lifetime there's plenty of speculation about this type of sword this is likely one of the actual swords owned by muhammad this one does not have a bifurcated or two prong tip and there's a 10th century fatimid depiction which is the earliest visual reference that we seem to have from what i've read the two-pronged design comes from a misinterpretation of the
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legends about this sword this originally apparently meant double-edged rather than a double bladed sword the curator of the higgins collection pointed out that fractures in the tip of early arabic wood swords were not uncommon so a two-bladed or two-pronged design could be inspired by this type of battle damage this example from the higgins museum has a hilt probably from the 17th century and the blade might be from the 19th century made in india
08:47
the weight is one and a half kilograms or three pounds and four ounces so not terribly heavy even though it looks quite a bit heavier the hole at the end of the bifurcation here is quite a smart way to prevent the blade from cracking down the split because this distributes the force more evenly around the whole here's a zulfiqar presumably owned by shah jahan the fifth mughal emperor who reigned from 1628 to
09:18
1658 and also commissioned the taj mahal among other monuments i wasn't able to confirm that this indeed belonged to shah jahan so i'm just gonna have to go with the statement about it that i found here's a particularly strange indian version with a strongly s-shaped blade this is such an awkward angle relative to the wrist i can't imagine this was ever used in combat in fact generally the 17th 18th and 19th century designs strike me as not terribly usable
09:52
two points is not better than one in this case this is much more likely to be stopped and not achieved the same penetration as a single pointed blade simply because things can get stuck in between the two points clothing comes to mind in particular if clothing bunches up or armor for example and the two prongs go past and then it just fills the gap this could really create a lot of resistance and prevent the blade from going deeper
10:23
let alone being stuck on a rib for example so this doesn't give you any practical benefit i can see but it introduces some drawbacks so for thrusting this is probably not great for cutting it's still fine of course the serrations seem a little excessive i i still have mixed feelings about serrations on blades that were not terribly common in history and i still have a suspicion that they might also get bound up by clothing
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but i haven't done tests yet and haven't seen anybody who has so it's a bit speculative as a side note here's a double-bladed iron dagger made by the shona people in zimbabwe central africa late 19th early 20th century so whether this was intended for use or not i don't know i doubt it but still interesting find and finally you've probably seen this distinctive shape in fantasy sword designs this is an ikakalaka
11:26
sword from the conda and other tribes in congo central africa this was not made exclusively as a weapon but also for other purposes apparently parade swords and other iron objects were used as a form of currency and for dowries the weight of this one right here is given by the african arts gallery as a mere 380 grams which is extremely light i would argue too light for a weapon here's a mid 20th century quartz sword so this was a prestige item there's
11:58
another quartz sword this one has a brass blade obviously not very suited for use as a weapon iron is fine bronze is fine brass not so much it's too soft this conda sword or should i say sword-like object obviously falls under that category it's either a prestige item or you know used for trade there's no way you could fight with this practically at all this is more of an art
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object basically same with these two on the right the left one is the more practical version but the other two are just pretty out there so they would not be practical but this design was also used by conda slavers as actual weapons so they weren't entirely just prestige slash art slash currency they're referred to as executioner swords as well the curvature under the flare tips could be effective for decapitations i imagine if you catch the
13:00
neck right in the inside of that curvature it's sort of like a sickle at that point i've shown and tested a sword which was custom made for me based on a modified design of the armor slayer from fire emblem and that thing was extremely effective that one ended up quite heavy to the point where it had to be a 10 and a half sword and better use with two hands but in terms of just destructive power the
13:31
thing was insane somebody in a recent live stream asked me about a sword axe hybrid and at the time i said that i don't consider that very useful because then you're just compromising the function of each but i wasn't thinking of this one at the time this is really what i would personally consider a a pretty good sword axe hybrid or maybe sword war pick hybrid something like that it's really more of a pick than an axe but either
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way this does work i do actually agree with the term armor slayer there is some merit to it now particularly any kind of armor other than plate you know for example male or gamblesons in particular just rips right through so it would be quite effective against light and medium armor and obviously devastating against unarmored targets so yeah there we are these are the ones
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that i picked for now if you like this i i might make more episodes if you will in this style not terribly often because this takes quite a while to research and make but uh hope you enjoyed it thanks for watching and have a good one every once in a while you come up on the publisher get out of here get off my lawn out of my living room tool that appeared in the mesolithic period period the period
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and profusioner which is a variety of microcrystalline quartz macrocrystalline damn it micro macro what's the difference right big small whatever tomato tomato [Music] oh

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