"Light, Architecture, and our Experience of Space" by Kynthia Chamilothori

"Light, Architecture, and our Experience of Space" by Kynthia Chamilothori

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Language: English

Type: Robot

Number of phrases: 293

Number of words: 1957

Number of symbols: 9191

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00:00
hello everyone so you already know what my title is so I'm going to talk to you mainly about topics that I addressed in my doctoral thesis which I contacted at the lipid lab at a culprit in Kedah dualism so ap FL where I was supervised by Marilyn Anderson and Janvrin olds and funded by V Luke's Tifton so I'm a real looks woman and if I have the time at the end of the presentation I will very briefly mention my future research work
00:31
areas now as an assistant professor of the human technology interaction group a TV so the driving force behind my work is a question of whether the composition of daylight patterns can affect how we experience the space and specifically what happens when we're exposed to a pattern that is like the one on the left so regular and man-made compared to a light patterns of it's complex and natural like light filter through leaves and this particular topic is even more prevalent today due to the prevalence of
01:04
complex facade patterns in contemporary architecture and this is something that I'm sure you have seen around you there is a growing trend in the use of this complex facade systems and perforated surfaces so my question is what does this facade designs how do they impact humans and specifically what happens from the perspective of the occupants so the core question of my work so far has been this can the facade geometry and the resulting daily patterns impact human responses and the literature tells
01:36
us that we cannot answer this question without taking into account the space function what are we doing in the space that we're working are we socializing and another important point is the regional differences does the opinion of people change between different continents or even different countries within the same region so to answer these questions I need you to do experiments with a wide range of facade in daylight variations the problem with doing this kind of experiments in a real environment is of course that it's very
02:06
difficult to control the facade design itself and we cannot control the daylight so if I found an effect I wouldn't know if it is because the facade that I changed or because of the lighting little changing in the meantime and this is why I'm in this session because we decided to introduce the use of virtual reality as an experimental tool now the core question now is whether we can use VR at all as a surrogate real environments and I won't go deeper into that but I can tell you that we developed a workflow that
02:36
allows the use of physically based rendering with radians in immersive VR and we validated this against real environments and we found that the perceptual accuracy the physical symptoms and the sense of presence in the virtual space are really positive and we proved that it's indeed possible to use this instead of real spaces so now we have the tool to use and we set out to examine the subjective and physiological responses to facade in daylight patterns this is a study I
03:08
conducted with my colleague Georgia keen opto at EPFL and we showed to 71 participants three facade geometry variations all had the same perforation ratio so the same amount of open to total surface area and you see the far left is called irregular it has rectangular openings distributed randomly and then the minimum one called regular it has the exact same openings but distributed on a grid and then we have also horizontal blinds all participants so the three facade
03:37
variations in random order and then half of them were told to imagine that would be socializing in that space and the other half they would be working in that space let's see what happened before that in each scene I asked how Pleasant how interesting and how exciting is this space and using an empathic ax II for bracelet we measured the skin conductance this is the amount of sweat on our skin and also the heart rate of participants we did the same also in a scene in the beginning of the experiments so a neutral scene to
04:09
establish what is called a baseline measurement so what is the physiological response of an individual in with a neutral stimulus so we found that the facade design has a significant effect in how pleasant how interesting and how exciting we perceive a space so facade design matters it's the exact same space we also showed that the spatial context in this experiment had a significant effect you so here the you see here the results in gray for the
04:39
working context are now much higher than those with blue in the social context but nevertheless in both it's a surprise in both contexts scenarios the irregular geometry had a significant effect on perception and was perceived more positively particularly when we compared it I don't think there's a laser to the regular for saturation which means that the spatial distribution of facade openings also has a significant effect
05:09
now we didn't find a significant effect of facade geometry and skin conductance but we did find a significant effect on heart rate and specifically when we compared the beginning of the experiments to the exposure of a participant to each scene when participants were immersed to the irregular facade variation the heart rate was lower compared to when they were exposed to the horizontal stripes this might sound strange but it's something that has been already been
05:40
found in the literature of psychophysiology and we know that involuntary attention is linked to Hardware deceleration so this is probably what is we'll see here you see here that the trend for the responses to how interesting is the space follows a similar trend to the heart rate deceleration because our vertical axis is always in the negative range so after that we set out to conduct an even bigger study this time to also take into
06:11
account the fact of latitude so we replicated the exact same experiment using VR so I had my VR headset and it went from country to country to Hanyu in Greece and to Lausanne in Switzerland and Claudia who would dress here before repeated this experiment in Trondheim in Norway but today I'm only going to focus on the ones with blue because this is the experiment I did myself so let's see what the participant saw each participant so six for celebrations
06:44
which actually come from a survey of architects about which facade variations will be more most promising we can discuss this later because it's another study and they show all 6 facades in random order and all six have the exact same perforation ratio and they come from existing buildings of contemporary architecture so let's see them I call them pattern one two three four five and six so all the six facade
07:15
variations were shown with no participant under one of the three possible sky types a clear sky with a high Sun angle a clear sky with a low Sun angle and an overcast sky and you see that these are common scenes with Claudia's experiment that she saw just before how about the participant we're told to imagine that we're socializing in the space and we saw furniture of a lounge and the other half we're told that they will be working in that space and we showed furniture of an office space and of course the same experiment
07:48
was repeated in Greece and in Switzerland now this is how it looks like it's a participant explores the scene for 30 seconds in silence and then after that I'm asking a series of questions the first four they were shown in random a scanner on the motor but the first four relate to the atmosphere of the space so how pleasant interesting exciting calming is the space and the other four relates more to the visual appearance how complex how spacious how bright is
08:19
in space how satisfied are you with the amount of you in this space let's see the results so we found a significant effect of facade for each one of these questions and also we didn't see a significant effect of sky type in our experiments or a special context didn't matter if participants thought they would be working or socializing in the space and there were also no differences between Greece and Switzerland so this means that the facade geometry
08:50
was a main driver of the responses from the factors we studied and if we look a bit closer to the different responses when we ask how pleasant and how calming his face is perceived this facade variation pattern 3 led to the highest evaluations of the exact same space and also that one pattern 6 is one of the most calming know one of the most pleasant now if we look at how interesting and how exciting the space is perceived these two facade variations
09:20
were the most interesting and the most exciting an interesting point is that a facet variation that is the most interesting is not necessarily the most pleasant now we know already that we found a significant effect of facade on how spacious how bright the space is perceived and also the level of satisfaction with the amount of view this effect was driven by one single pattern pattern for with small rectangular openings that were randomly distributed I'm sure you can guess that
09:52
this has an effect on how we perceive the view out and probably this is what drove the fact that we found which was a significant decrease in all these evaluations even though of course the space was equally spacious equally bright and will have the same amount of view in terms of perforation ratio and other fascinating results was what happens when we change from straight vertical elements to slightly skewed vertical elements that we see here on the bottom so this change led to a
10:22
significant increase in how pleasant how interesting how exciting and how calming this base is perceived even though in terms of geometry there's a very very very small difference so you know already from cloudy's presentation that we had additional scenes thrown in so we know that this perceptual effects of facade do not change when we change the window size do not change when we change the space at least for those that we tried and we also didn't find Africa
10:54
skytyper of latitude this means that the facade geometry is the main driver of spatial experience now to conclude with an overall summary we found so a result of experiments with VR that were conducted using a workflow that we developed and validated against real environments then we demonstrated for the first time the facade geometry has a significant effect not only on the subjective responses but also it has a
11:27
quantifiable physiological effect on humans and lastly even seemingly small changes in the design of the facade sorry can have a strong effect on perception and to finish with future work of course the next step is to replicate this experiments in a real space and I'm also very curious to see what happens if we don't have a side pattern but only a light pattern because if we find comparable effects this would mean that we could have applications not
11:58
only static and kinetic facades but also in artificial lighting for example with dynamic lighting applications I know this I would like to thank you [Applause]

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