Let's review Italian definite articles (il, lo, la, i, gli, le) (for all levels)

Let's review Italian definite articles (il, lo, la, i, gli, le) (for all levels)

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Language: English

Type: Human

Number of phrases: 73

Number of words: 770

Number of symbols: 3769

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00:00
Hello everyone and welcome back to my channel. In today's video I would like to review the definite articles to clarify some things. If you need subtitles, please turn them on. These you see on the screen are the definite articles: il, i, lo, gli, la, le. Let's start with masculine articles. We have two options: il, lo. Let's start with "lo", which we can also find in the L' version, it is used with masculine nouns starting with a vowel, with S + consonant, ps, gn, x, y, z. The plural form is "gli". The other option we have is the article "il" which is used with all other masculine nouns starting with a consonant;
01:09
the plural is "i". Let's see some examples. The word "table" is masculine, it starts with the consonant t, so we have to use the article "il". The table. In the plural, the tables. The word "quaderno" starts with the consonant q, so we use the article "il". The notebook. In the plural, the notebooks. Let's now look at a couple of examples with the article "lo". For example, the word "stivale" starts with S + consonant, so it wants the article "lo". The boot. In the plural, boots. Let's now see the word "albero". It's a masculine word that starts with a vowel, so it wants the article "lo". Here, however, there are two vowels one after the other, one following the other,
02:16
so in this case we have to do what is called "elision" of the vowel in the article. Therefore "lo albero" becomes "l'albero". In the plural, trees. Speaking with you in the comments here on YouTube, but also on Instagram, I realized that the custom is to teach that L' is an independent article, when in fact it is not. When you see the apostrophe it is simply the result of the elision of the vowel in the article LO or in the article A. What is elision? Elision is the phenomenon whereby the vowel is removed - in this case from the article LO or the article LA - when the noun that follows begins with another vowel.
03:19
The elision is indicated with an apostrophe. I honestly find it odd that it is taught that L' is an independent article. Some say it is done to facilitate explanation. I agree in part, because there are limits anyway. In case we have to use nouns that start with a vowel, but end in -e (therefore invariable from the point of view of gender), we need to know if, for example, we are talking about "a male teacher" or "a female teacher" , especially if we then have to agree the adjective that follows. So if you teach that with a noun such as "teacher",
04:20
starting with a vowel, you use the article L' and the explanation ends there, there is, in my opinion, a great lack of information. Because how does a student know how to agree the adjectives that might follow (without knowing if the noun is masculine or feminine)? I am more for the explanation of the phenomenon of elision early on at any level, because if something is explained well, students will understand it. And it's not that hard to avoid explaining it completely. I find this reasoning a bit counterproductive, because we now might facilitate explanations, but then this problem will come back around later, when students realize how language works or because maybe they are at a higher level and do not understand how to do the noun-adjective agreement.
05:28
So, in my opinion, it is best to explain everything clearly from the beginning, especially since definite articles are a fundamental part of the language. We use them constantly. Let's now look at the feminine articles. In the singular we have "la", which we can also find in the L' version. LA is used with all feminine nouns. If feminine nouns start with a vowel, then LA becomes L', but we are talking about the same article. The plural form it is "le". Let's see some examples. The word "scala". The ladder. In the plural, the ladders/stairs. The word "ape" starts with a vowel, so "la ape" becomes "l'ape", because there are two vowels that follow each other.
06:37
In the plural, bees. In the description of the lesson below I will leave some links with exercises, if you want to practice with the definite articles. I thank you for watching this lesson. If you have any questions, leave them in the comments below. And I'll see you in the next lesson. See you soon, bye!

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