Controlling The Paint in Rebelle

Controlling The Paint in Rebelle

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00:01
[Music] controlling the paints and watercolors that has always been the challenge in traditional watercolors there are fewer options compared to digital to control your paint happy accidents are great but it is nice to get what you expect when you paint using water paint combinations on dry or wet paper will all give you different results what i did was set up 16 mini demos to
00:36
give us different results for the tools and paint water combinations we will use they all have their own individual layers so i could apply different parameters to each if i need to the eight above the red line will all be done on dry paper and the four below the red line will be done all on wet paper okay let's start with the dry paint and what i'll do
01:07
is move down here and enlarge it so we're just working on that area and it'll give us a nice big area to work with and what i want to show you first is just the dry paint on dry paper and what i could do is now i am using a 10 uh the palette of these uh colors are actually uh the identical paints that i use for traditional watercolors
01:38
they all if i hover over them they all have the colors that actually are the same exact colors of my winsor newton watercolors i use for traditional painting this way i use the exact same colors in numeric value as i do in the real-life windsor newton colors now what we will start with is just say for example let's pick that cobalt violet and then we'll just make uh some streaks here and then we can go back in with the
02:09
cerulean blue and overlap these a couple of times and then maybe the burnt sienna and the opacity and the size obviously doesn't matter too much at this point but the water does because i have the water completely off so what i'm doing is putting dry paint down on dry paper now as you could see there's really not too much of anything at all going on there's no diffusion no mixing no anything it's pretty much staying right where it's at and it's just creating optical mixes and
02:41
that's about it but what's important to remember about this is all the paint that i put down is considered now a wet area we could verify that by showing what's wet on that particular layer and then we could see that on this particular layer now all the paint i put down is wet so now with that in mind if i go over to the wet paint on dry paint area and i will
03:10
select that layer and i could just put down some different dry paint again and we could go with the even the cobalt blue this time and just make some different swatches but now if i get just for example say this uh rose color here and turn up the water now that i have water in the paint i don't even put it all the way up to 100 and take it across
03:41
these paints you'll see what happens now the paint in the dry paper is going to stay where it's at but the paint that overlaps any section of the paint that's already been put down is going to start dramatically mixing with it and if i see obviously any of these things that are happening that are mixing i could just quick dry them and they'll stay that way but now everything that's down will be considered wet so that way now that if i put down any
04:13
more colors just for example if i take uh just this french ultramarine and take it across this way then now again this this area right here on the dry paper is going to stay right where it's at and anything i put in the uh pre-wet pre-painted area is going to start blending and and bleeding pretty quickly because i have everything turned up so we don't have to watch
04:43
but you can see it's carrying for lack of better words the pigment off onto the pre-painted areas if i quick dry that then that's what we'll be left with after i painted a wet paint on dry paint on dry paper now moving over to here the water tool wash now i put down a color first say for example i'll go to that layer and then i'll go to the water tool and
05:14
now if i just put down clean water and that's going to uh take it i'll put a solid layer first and what we'll do is we're going to darken this up and then we're going to take it in different shapes and then we're going to make some different shapes of clear water now it's not painting this the the light blue you see it's actually just showing where the wet
05:47
areas are because if i turn this off now there's nothing there because that's just clear water that we put down so if i go back and grab uh let's just go with the uh quinacridone gold this time if i start painting in these areas what's going to happen is it's going to stay nice and sharp edges where the dry paper is but anywhere i put down clear water it's going to start bleeding
06:18
pretty bad and that will happen anywhere i paint you could see where the edges will be of the clear water and then it's going to start blending nicely and creating somewhat random effects and that's the great thing about this that they are random there is no specific pattern to any of these which is great because otherwise your eye would pick up a specific pattern right away the randomness is is what really makes it a watercolor
06:50
effect now if i put this back on then i'll see where my wet areas are now keep in mind all the uh the quinacridone gold i just put down is now a wet area but now if i put some over here i'll turn that off and then if i go crossed here then now what's going to happen is it's going to pick up those two little small strokes of clear water i picked up and they're going to start bleeding out that way and then bleeding in this main area and then everywhere else it'll stay a nice
07:21
straight edge so what i'm doing here is i'm getting some really random patterns that that may be great when it comes to trying to render foliage or low brush or or any other kind of objects you think that have this type of pattern to it now in this particular case we put down clear water first and then just painted over it now if i go over to the water tool
07:52
splatter what will happen is i will select that layer and now what i could do is actually i actually just pick a color let's go with the uh cobalt blue and then we're going to turn up the opacity a little bit and then turn down the water and what i could do is start making some bold lines here and then what it's going to do is since i have a little bit of water in it it's going to
08:25
carry just a little bit and then if i put down a couple of swatches of these magenta and also the cobalt violet but now if i go to the water tool and hit the splatter heavy button i'm going to even make it a little bit bigger and now if i start going over this area and i could turn that off so you could see what's going to happen it's going to start lifting up my pigment and carrying it
08:56
and this is almost like salt in traditional watercolors but what it's going to do is anywhere my water i put it down and if it overlaps the edges then it's going to start bleeding up into that water if it doesn't then it'll hold a straight edge but if that is all done within the area of the paint then it's also going to start carrying the pigment out because we're just using clean water on a pigment or stain depending on the color
09:27
that would be traditional digital it's irrelevant but now with this as it's going and moving if i really see what i like what's going on or uh the mixing uh is creating shapes or or combinations i'm looking for then i could just quick dry it and and keep what i have and that will be since it's on its own unique layer then i could uh do some other painting or other effects around here if this was a painting
10:01
and then save that just the way it is so i don't destroy what's going on now what we could do is go to the marquee tool and we will do that right now moving on to the marquee tool what i will do center this up and then enlarge our paper so we can see where we're working and then select the marquee tool layer and what the marquee tool will do is
10:36
help us control our borders previously we left the borders bleed out into clean water and wet paint that pretty much created whatever border it wanted to now say for example we want to control our borders then just starting off for example with this square marquee and i grab a color and we're not going to have too much water in it the pasty will be down low
11:07
and we'll use this size if i paint around it then what's going to happen is because i have a little bit of water and it's going to feather out a little bit within itself but then it is with a controlled edge so if i want a fairly loose mix of paints and colors together then what i could do is use the marquee tool to uh restrict my areas that i'm going to work in
11:37
then that way i know what overall shape i'm going to end up with now keep in mind i could even still take just clean water within that area turn that off and then now these edges are going to start blending and bleeding because of the fact that that clean water is going to lift up and carry the pigment out in the edge that i made the
12:10
shape with the clean water if i like what's going on i'll freeze it and that's it but then keep in mind this all happened within a restricted area of the marquee tool now if i go up here and reselect the marquee tool turn it off and then i'm left with this shape keep in mind then i could even use the marquee tool to go back in and eliminate what i don't want if i grab just say for example the ellipse and make just this shape here
12:43
and then enter that so it locks it in place but then what i can actually do is go up to the uh right here selection area and then select invert area grab my eraser and i can actually erase everything around it and then just keep with what i have and if i go back to the marquee tool and hit deselect now i have a shape uh that's rather
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unique that has a constrained outer perimeter edge that is a rather bold mixing of colors but it is a very specific shape so if i would need a controlled area a marquee tool is very good to use it uh jumping into the freehand marquee tool and now i can actually create any shape i want if this was even being
13:46
drawn around a particular object and then keep that and now if i just say for example grab this cat orange and turn the water up a little bit but turn the opacity away down to give it a real light wash then that's the shape i'll end up with and since i'm on the same layer as the marquee tool it will pick up that color of the egg-shaped original pattern and move it around also
14:18
go up and grab the marquee tool again and deselect that area and then i can even fast dry it and then now i have different colors mixing in different areas because of the shapes i created with the marquee tool this is just one way to help me uh control an area i'm working in especially if i'm using uh wet paints on wet paper
14:53
now if i work with very odd shaped or subtle colors that are unique then that is where the transparency law comes in i'll move down to the transparency lock layer and then now if i pull out a color just say for example uh that cerulean blue and what i'll do is i'll turn up the opacity just a little bit but then very little water and i'm going
15:24
to take the size down to make some real fine areas and then what i want them to even do is then bleed out into the paper even as tools as we used and i want to make a very irregular shape here just to start us off and then even take a splatter with some other colors
16:04
and then let that mix in and quick dry that but now if i want to only work on the paint that i'm working on now what i could do is go over here and hit the lock transparency and now i'll only be able to paint on the area that i've already painted on so if i go down and just say for example grab this bold red so we can see what's going on i can't paint it anywhere except where i've already painted i have the splatter tool so it's going
16:36
to splatter throughout what i've already painted now if i even grab just say for example the mop again and grab a unique color just say for example this let's go with a darker color this depression blue and we'll make the area bigger because no matter how big the brush is i'm still only going to be able to paint on the locked transparency area which is the area i've already painted on so for that reason i'm only going to be able to paint what i've already painted
17:07
and then now those colors will bleed and blend together but all of this fine texture will stay where it's at because it's in a locked transparency area so now i'm getting very interesting color mixes here and color uh colors bleeding together that are in my opinion a very true to life like traditional watercolors except with the color uh colors on the lock transparency layer
17:42
it is very unique as to then only be able to go back in and work the areas that you've already painted so for example if i actually now i could turn this off and then go back in and add new layers like say if i add this turquoise blue and i'm going to make it real fine if i just make some lines here like this and then i will quick dry that and then now turn the lock transparency layer back on
18:16
now i could even go back in and then add colors to these and it's only going to be in that locked transparency pre-painted area so if i want to add shading or value changes or additional colors they're only going to go where i pre-painted and then now if i even want to uh and just say for example bold red again if i make the size even real big
18:47
it's still only going to go where i pre-painted okay now uh just in case we need to review uh before we move on to the drips there is something we need to review about the layers themselves now with these layers the way they are any layer above the layer below it that is the dominant layer so in other words if i put anything on a marquee tool layer it will be over the transparency lock
19:19
layer meaning that it will cover that layer however working in transparent watercolors that is not always the case transparent watercolors are vibrant and unique to painting because the light reflects off the white paper back up through the color that gives them the vibrance they have acrylics and oils are very opaque and you only see the top surface of the colored paint and that's it whereas with watercolors
19:50
we have to watch and be a little bit more careful in digital as to how we protect our paint now just say for example if we go to the transparent lock layer that we are on i could turn off the transparent lock and then just say for example we make a layer above it we will call it just say red opaque and then we will make one more layer
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and call it blue transparent and now what we could do with these two layers is we'll just go up to our marquee tool and then we'll just make any kind of shape and then we'll grab our blue any blue but what we will do is keep it transparent so we'll turn this down to like say around there and we could keep the water off and because it's our blue transparent layer i will just color it in so now you could see that if i go back
21:05
up to the marquee tool deselect and now we have a layer that's above the transparency lock layer this is the transparency lock layer that if i have the blue transparent layer even above the transparency lock you could still see the transparency lock layer now if i go to the red opaque and then just create another shape and then grab just say for example the red
21:36
but this time we're going to make it opaque and color it in and then go back and i'll just deselect and then say for example what we could do now is with the red opaque it's above the transparency lock layer so what it's going to do is it's actually going to uh i will lock that in place and then what we could do
22:06
is actually take this layer and move it underneath the transparency lock layer so now even though it's opaque but now what you could do is you could actually see the transparency lock layer because the red opaque is behind it or below it but that's only because it's an opaque so in other words with the blue transparent layer no matter where i put it you're still going to see the transparent lock layer and if i even
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put it above it you'll still see it now if i put the red opaque above the transparent lock layer then you won't see the red transparent lock layer at all now if i even take this layer and move it just say for example up here and then take the blue transparent layer down here but what i could do is now you could see since the blue transparent layer is on top you can see at first it's overlapping the red
23:13
and it's overlapping the transparency lock layer but you could still see the transparency lock layer now if i take this red opaque layer and move it down below the transparency lock layer now you could see all three layers no matter what their order in the layer panel is we could see all three layers the blue the transparency lock layer and the red
23:46
solid opaque layer this is going to be important to remember when we go to our drip section okay now that we know that working with transparent watercolors the sequence of the layers is not that important only because transparent layers will project through others you'll be able to see all layers at the same time if we have a subject that we need to protect and i will go do that right now and
24:19
actually move over to the drips section and i'm going to shrink this down just a little bit and then say for example if i go to the drips layer i'm going to create a layer above it and we'll just call it subject and if this is any object or subject we need to protect just say for example it is uh just light in color let's just say for example yellow if i
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go and create any kind of rectangle just like that and then i'm going to turn it a little bit and then move it down in here then i'll hit my enter key and that'll lock it in place now what i can do then is actually just grab my yellow and then with the water opacity way down that's what i want and just color it in now i can only paint within the
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rectangle area so that's not going to help me if i want to paint the background but now if i do go up and hit edit and then invert selection then now that means i'll only be able to paint outside of that rectangle area but now if i go down to the drips and if i actually then just grab some darker colors because this will be my background colors and even say i could turn up the opacity
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i'll even turn on the drips a little bit with the direction i could turn the size down but then if i start painting various colors here they're going to start blending and bleeding together but what you'll see is they're also going to blend and bleed and drip around the shape so now if i hit the quick dry there you could already see what's going on
26:28
that if i want my colors to mix unobstructed behind my subject then that means i have to protect that subject somehow because otherwise if i don't if i go back to the marquee tool and then deselect and then now i'm still on the drips layer if i want to mix some more colors just say for example go back to the cobalt blue and start mixing it throw in even some
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greens and let those mix together now what's going to happen is now i quick dry that they're going to start contaminating my subject area remember this is a light yellow subject area that i wanted to protect and i would not want any background pattern to contaminate it so what i could do now is go back to my subject area and then actually
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go back to the marquee tool and hit my magic wand and select that yellow and now that i have it selected i could then go back to the drips layer and then hit my eraser and actually just erase out those drips and then i would have had a mixing colors together on the drips layer unobstructed by my shape i'll go back to the magic wand and deselect and then now i would have
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mixing colors that would have drips unobstructed by my subject shape and this way i would have a background that would not be interfered with by the shape of my subject okay now moving to drips two i could do that one other different way now which way is better or not it will depend on how you use them and what you're trying to paint now if i go to my drips 2
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layer and then what i could do is actually first create a mask layer and what i could do is go back and grab my black and what i will do is actually grab my script zero brush it's a nice sharp edge brush i'll take the size way down and i want the opacity way up to 100 no water at all and then if i just start creating any kind of a shape that just
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say for example this was my subject that i had to protect and then what i could do is just make it very intricate and i'll even change the size of it here just to give it a little bit more of an interest and for whatever reason this is the shape we have to protect and we want to paint a background behind that unobstructed what i would do is then
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make this a mask layer first i also have to do is hit m now what this does is it makes every other layer an influenced layer now what that means is then no matter what layer i would paint on that mask would still protect the paper and keep it white now in this particular case what i'll do is i'll protect the paper and then keep it white and then i can always go back and paint that area whatever way i want
30:18
but now what i would do is then go if i go to drips 2 and again the same thing will happen if i go and grab some darker colors and i can keep my drips on and what i'll do is i'll turn up the water i could turn down the opacity a little bit but no matter how i do this if i start painting it's already going to start dripping and if i start grabbing some various colors they'll mix together nice
30:48
but what they're going to do is again they're going to mix around my shape and i may not want that so if i go back and just say for example have the drips on but then what i'll do is i will take that off of an influenced layer so it's not influenced by the mask anymore and then i could grab my darker colors start mixing them again and then what i
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could do is start going everywhere and now i can mix a background unobstructed and they will mix and drip everywhere i'll quick dry that maybe go bigger shape and then take some red and let that mix all over and take this color here and then let them all mix together hit quick dry and then now what i got is
31:57
a very nice mixture of paints and to see what's going on i can even take this mask layer now keep in mind no matter where the mask layer is it will still protect it but if i take it above the drips too then now you'll see my mask layer unobstructed and what i could do then is if i turn that off you could see i have some areas of protection over here some areas of protection over there but now i kind of lost my original shape
32:29
that i had so if i turn back on the mask layer and then go back up and do the same thing hit my magic wand select that black because it will come out nice as a solid shape selection go back to the drips 2 layer and then actually hit my eraser and also have to do is turn off the mask
33:00
and then just go back and erase this out and because i was even able to select my mask area now i'll go back up and hit this and deselect and now i have a very uh free form mixture of paints behind my subject area that were unobstructed by the shape of the mask so no matter how i do it whether i do it as an in averted selection or a mask
33:36
area with plenty of influence layers either way i could go back and select that area and then just erase out my background layer shape behind the subject and end up with an unobstructed mixed color pattern behind my subject okay now what we'll do is fit our paper back on a screen and we will get ready to work on the wet
34:09
paper area using the wet paint dry tool eraser and pause diffusion okay next we're just going to work with wet paint on wet paper and i will center that up and enlarge it so we have some room to work and what i'll also do is turn off the drips and turn off our masking layer we won't need it anymore and then go down and select the wet paint layer
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that is the layer we're working on now and the wet paper area these next four demos i already pre-wet each layer and i could verify that showing that it's now wet and just a a quick setup uh what i did was i don't have the um in my preferences it says show wet layer when using water or dry tools i don't have that clicked i actually choose not to have this
35:13
automatically click on if i grab a water tool or a dry tool only because often i work with light pastel colors and this could be darker than what i'm working with so what i do is i just keep it off and i actually just want to see what's going on as i do it because then keep in mind digitally speaking you could easily undo each step just with a control z but now if i do grab i just say for example a cobalt vial again or let's grab a new
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color this uh a reel and and what i can do is put it down and then let it start to bleed out and what it'll do is it's going to bleed out in all different directions and if we use just a lot of the oranges and yellows then you'll see it'll start to feather out in every direction because the paper is wet now too and then i also have 100 percent of water in the paint also so it's going to be carrying out really nice and what this
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will do though is it'll start to diffuse so much that you'll actually even lose uh the original brush strokes so you'll get just nice diffusions of colors and and that is excellent depending on what you're trying to work if you don't want to show the brush strokes you just have nice mixed colors and and randomly they are doing a great job of just mixing uh all together if i grab maybe this french ultramarine and then just leave
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it go in the yellow it'll start to diffuse out and what i could do is i it's going to start carrying the yellow with it what i'll do is just center this up just a little bit more it's even going to go up into our red line but that's okay uh right now if i see some of the feathering and some of the water taken uh the pigment so to speak uh and carrying it with it i can just hit the quick dry and i'll lock that in place
37:17
and then if i go back and just grab some more colors let's see let's try the turquoise here and then let it now blend in because now you could see if i do show the wet areas then you'll see that everything's still wet where i dried it it's even with the page and then what i just put down is even more wet now still moving uh and then what it's gonna do is it's gonna start to create some bloom effects and that's when uh water picks up the pigment
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and or color and just starts carrying it out to the outer edges as far as the water can go but what that will do is give you some really nice uh mixtures uh you just have to be careful that the blooms don't overpower your composition of whatever you're trying to do i'll quick dry that and then now we'll move on to the next one and that would be the dry tool and we'll start the dry tool now the dry
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tool is a little bit different in nature and what it does is it's only going to lift up the water it's not going to lift up the paint or color so if i say for example go back and just grab this brown matter and and now i know this layer i will take the dry tool layer and i know that if i click on this it's also wet so i'll turn that off just to verify that is wet and if i start putting down some of this brown matter
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it's going to start carrying off in different directions but if i go to my dry tool now that if i want i don't want to keep the layer wet if i dry it because what i want to do is i want to actually create spots in here that's going to actually break up the paint differently and if i even grab this one and you'll see how even make shapes in here where it'll stop the paint from carrying it because that's a dry area now
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i could verify that by clicking on it and then you could see where my dry areas are and what that will make a difference also is if i actually go back in and grab another color and then just place some back over that and watch how that will diffuse out into the brown matter but then also it will do uh different mixings uh depending on where the dry paper is now or the wet paper still was
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and the reason why is if we use a dry tool again here it's going to start diffusing quite a different directions different ways that you're going to start getting shapes and mixes that are actually rather pleasant let's grab this uh right here and i can even turn down the opacity real light and we'll just get real soft mixes in here
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and see what happens and again because the paper is wet too it's going to be carrying everything off now if i dry this area here before then that's why this is bleeding out through here but it stopped right here and then if i want a given textures like this keep in mind if you have some real soft edges and then some hard edges depending on if you were doing something such as boulders or trees or different types of subjects you might
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need hard edges somewhere and soft edges somewhere else and that you could achieve just by either using your dry tool or your water tool either one okay next we'll go on to the eraser and i will move us over there right now and we'll just center this up and give us some nice white paper to work with uh first thing i'll do is select the eraser layer and then i'll verify that our layer is wet which it is
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and the difference between the eraser and other tools especially the dry tool the dry tool is only going to pick up the water and leave the color behind whereas we can actually set the eraser to do the exact opposite now for example if i just grab some of this like french ultramarine blue put it down and then maybe a deeper permanent rose or permanent magenta and let those two colors blend together i can even grab a little bit of red and
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then mix it in and let these diffuse together now if i grab my eraser right now i have a hard edge brush uh selected but then right here it says keep layer wet if i check that and that's what i could do so i could pick up the pigment and their color but i'll leave the water behind and so say for example if i want this cut out like this now i'll have a new shape here and then it'll start feathering back in
42:28
but it's feathering into my new erased shape but i left the water behind so then this way it it is creating a new shape of however i want the paint to diffuse out into the paper if i don't even want it to mix into this paint over here then i could just erase it out and create my own shape free hand and now whatever shape i want to be left with it will diffuse the color uh in this new
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direction depending on how i erase it and then now if i even uh take a splotch out in the middle and then also change to a soft i'll wait till it auto saves and then take this out and then now i'll have two different shapes here of paints going in two different directions so now if i take this cobalt violet and put it near here then it's going to uh diffuse back
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into my white shape now this one's already closed and shut this one's still closing shut but you could see how the eraser can manipulate your shape that you're working with and leave you with a different pattern or shape than what you originally started with your original brush strokes okay now this diffused out nicely but we'll move on toward our paws diffusion
44:06
our final little demo and what we could do there is we'll see that in the pause diffusion it's pretty much uh just as it sounds and now i could go to the pause diffusion layer verify that that layer is wet and it is turn that off and now what i could do is a couple of different things here if i grab some paint this is cobalt blue and start putting it out it'll start
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diffusing out for me but if i want to slow this down or even stop it then what i could do is just hit this button over here pause the fusion and it'll stop everything that's going on now i didn't quick dry it i just stopped the action of the flowing paint so now if i go back and just say for example this burnt sienna put some of it in and then maybe this uh permanent rose
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and put that in and just to give you an idea that now i have all these colors mixing what it's doing is it's giving me the time to do what i want and get a little bit more detail-oriented of however i want to do this and then if i'm ready and i'm done with what colors i want to put down then i could just hit play the diffusion again and it's going to start playing everything and it's going to start diffusing everything as it is
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with the paints going down and now if say for example again if i like some of these shapes or some of these colors blending together the way they are uh for whatever reason i'm painting uh the subject matter now okay quick dry it and then they are there to stay so if i want i could then stop it and have a pause on it and then now put some more colors down let's just go with a bright red
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and then we'll grab some of this turquoise blue and then if i play it again then now those two colors that i just put down are going to start diffusing again into the wet paper and what they will do is um give me the chance to put down the colors the way i want and i can actually then play the diffusion and
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allow it to go as much as i want if i want to add more colors i could pause it if i want to just quick dry and i'm happy with everything the way it is then i could just end that and then that's it and then now i will have my finished product but what it does is it allows me to give the chance to put down some of the colors and give me the time to do more intricate work before i allow them to blend then this way i'm not trying to play ketchup with uh the paint diffusing
47:17
rather quickly as i'm trying to work now that is definitely something you can't do in traditional watercolors with that in mind i hope these demos helped you in some way shape or form to plan how you could paint your favorite subjects in your your own style thanks for watching

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