5 Italian expressions created by Dante Alighieri that are still used today (ita audio + subs)

5 Italian expressions created by Dante Alighieri that are still used today (ita audio + subs)

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Language: English

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Number of phrases: 62

Number of words: 788

Number of symbols: 3710

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00:00
Hello everyone and welcome back to my channel. Today is DanteDì, that is the day dedicated to Dante Alighieri and his Comedy. And this year also marks the 700th anniversary of his death. To celebrate this day, I want to tell you about some words and expressions that were created by Dante during the writing of his work and that have come down to us. These are not simple quotes from the Comedy, but real expressions that are used in everyday life, in informality, in conversation. They are an integral part of the contemporary language and are used by almost everyone. These words and expressions have endured over time and in language, demonstrating how much his words have always remained current. The words and expressions that I have chosen to present to you today are five:
01:02
"and here the painful notes begin", "a hellish bedlam", "stay cool", "without infamy and without praise", "it does not touch me". The first way of saying is "the painful notes", which is found in a larger sentence. We find the original phrase in the fifth canto of hell in verse 25: which means "now the cries of pain begin to be heard by me". Today it is often said "and here the painful notes begin", the phrase is slightly different from the original one and is used to introduce an unpleasant speech. It prepares the listener to hear negative things. Then we have the word "bolgia", which we find in the 24th canto of hell. The bolge - called by Dante "Malebolge" - are the circular and concentric pits of the eighth circle of hell,
02:10
where the fraudulent are punished. Today this word is used to indicate a place where there is a lot of confusion and from which you want to leave. For example: I don't like walking in the confusion and so I try to avoid certain parts of the city on weekends, for example. If I find myself in that situation, in the midst of the confusion, the crowd on Saturday afternoon in Via del Corso, I can say "enough, let's get out of this hellish bedlam!". Then we have the expression "stay cool", which we find in the 32nd canto of hell, where Dante speaks of an expanse of frozen water at the bottom of hell fed by the Cocito river, in which traitors are immersed. "There where sinners are cool", which paraphrasing means "in the place where sinners suffer from the cold".
03:13
Today this expression is used to say that a situation will end badly or otherwise not well, it will be an annoying situation. Today, however, it is used for much lighter situations than those of the Comedy. For example: you have arrived at the post office, you take the number and you realize that you have more than 50 people in front of you. So I can tell you "stay cool", that is, "I'm sorry for you that you will spend all day there". Then we have "without infamy and without praise". We find this expression in the third canto of hell. The original version is "sanza 'nfamia e sanza lodo", which for Dante represents an absolute offense, as he uses it to describe those who do not take a position, those who have no opinion. Today the meaning has changed slightly and is used to say that something or someone is not noteworthy.
04:17
A food that is neither good nor bad is without infamy and without praise; a film that is neither good nor bad; an exam that did not go well, but not bad either. A synonymous adjective could be "insignificant". Let us now see the expression "it does not touch me". It is Beatrice who pronounces this expression in the second canto of hell: "Your misery does not affect me, nor the flame of this fire does", which means your unhappiness does not affect me, just as the flames of hell do not affect me. Today this phrase is said - sometimes even ironically - to say that something is not of our interest. The problem does not affect me, that is, it does not affect me, it does not interest me. That's all for today. Hope you enjoyed the video! I have tried to choose expressions and words that are a little different from the ones we always talk about
05:33
and that I find quite easy for you to understand and potentially reuse in conversation. If you want to find out some fun facts about Dante, I leave you the link to another video I made on the subject. Thank you for choosing to watch this video to the end and see you in the next one. See you soon, bye!

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