Welcome to Deathrow

Welcome to Deathrow

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00:26
[Music] [Music] [Music] Merlin lag live were on location tonight and the NWA ruthless studios here to talk to NWA and eazy-e probably the most
01:46
controversial rap group in Los Angeles at the time all the rappers were claiming their hometowns South Bronx you know wherever they may be New York Queens whatever case may be weird from Compton coming up in the ghetto period builds character to me you know what I'm saying it definitely can be all character if you use it in a positive way when we seen you know regular homies from the neighborhood that was just putting down real street rats you know it made us feel like we could do it something really special was
02:17
coming out of that neighborhood it was a fresh really volatile time in music I liken it to Elvis Presley when Rock and Roll started to when the Beatles came it was something really special coming out of there after a while Michael Jackson didn't work people didn't believe the height we didn't care we didn't care if they didn't feel it with all of that trying to be shy nonsense people weren't checking for that no more rap made it gritty I think we're successful because we tell it like it is you know that's what people want to hear because he's sick of hearing about fairy tales and stuff like
02:48
that NWA told me was like anti against anti-establishment they was bringing you know south central to the forefront and what was happening in drugs and the whole Shimon it was hitting another element of a society that nobody else had touched on they talked about being gangsters gangster gangster was a big hit [ __ ] the police was a big hit it's not what you know is what you can prove when I wouldn't got NWA homes I bought them as a fan you just see all-star cast of people of easy being
03:19
the mastermind cube in the rhyme writer Dre playing down the tracks the producer and then you have ran plato of supporting cast and that dismayed of one of the great groups of hip hop they don't tell you what to do one will tell you nothing what not to do you got your own free to mature up easy represented you know the hardcore little gangster on the corner because this record has her scene on it I said something are you talking about raping somebody and
03:50
everything people were selling cocaine making a lot of money and he was the first person that actually came out and admitted it and boasted about it on a record some [ __ ] eazy-e turned out to have some business savvy easy was a local crack slinger okay made him some money and because I was one a few guys he knew had a studio he wanted to get with me and getting a studio he was not intended to be a rapper he was gonna be a financier Dre was producing for Lonzo
04:22
crew-cut records and the Wrecking Crew Dre started getting in trouble he was going to jail for warrants on a regular basis I'm digging in my pocket to get him out okay so I got to the coma I got tired up and Lanza didn't get him out of jail easy got him out of jail when air got him out of jail they cut a deal the Dre would do some tracks for Eric in my studio a DNA hooked up when it was boys ever since then he put the dot on your target then you blow the [ __ ] out the [ __ ]
04:52
no joke easy knew it was like a joke to him ok was like but he got so far into it it was like ok I am this I'm walking through the Carson mall I look up in the HQ which is uh what a good store in a gun store these guys are buying automatic semi-automatic weapons go on tour with I'm like [ __ ] welcome to you guys going on Vietnam or what they were selling out the back of cars and they were making money and they were going to the top one way or the other used to ride around an easy Jeep all day my cell records tada what they call swap
05:24
meets out here pleased to make people buy records how'd you make a buy at a guy easy paid Lonzo to introduce him to Jerry Heller Jerry Heller was basically dr. Dre and Eric rights manager and label head Rufus started from eazy-e eazy-e new that Dre was a dope producer he did the Straight Outta Compton album he did easy does it he did Michelle lays out he did the docs album dr. Dre was one of these
05:55
guys that could take this these this raw street sound and turn it into the kind of magic that would hit to do a wide audience of kids they had a message that clearly was heard and felt by young people all over the country he had pockets of young brothers who sold dope and had to carry 9-millimeter pistols who had a lot of money that could be late every kid wants something that sort of forbidden certainly this kind of imagery was in fact they couldn't even hear it on their regular radio stations
06:26
they sold over a million albums now we have to understand that with rap music past five hundred thousand six hundred thousand albums you go outside the black community you have little white kids out there that was you know grew up in pops Country Club and they wasn't having it they wanted to hear NWA it became clear that there weren't just ten thousand kids listening to this there was hundreds of thousands in age city people set back and seen an album that sold million units there's never played on radio and and and I have the question - how does this happen
06:57
how did this happen what went on here now when it starts making real money and the star looked like some success is gonna come about that's when the [ __ ] starts Eazy and Jerry wasn't paying dr. Dre enough money at that time I was old money but they was they weren't in paying it you know saying I think they were trying to starve me starve me out as hard as you work for your money there's at least two or three people out there working just as hard to get it from you I was there when Dre told me he would sell his soul to the devil for
07:28
million bucks that's where right now devil got to have a receipt for his ass Suge Knight was always around he was around in the days of NWA I just I never noticed who he was so he was just a big kid you know he was really at that time totally nobody Suge Knight was a bodyguard bodyguarding Bobby Brown being a bodyguard is probably one of the best music schools music industry schools that you could go to because you're gonna learn everything about the
08:04
business I was out there looking at learning you know and I seen the different people complained I seen artists I've seen people trying to be honest I see people talk about songs and I'm just listening I'm hearing at all he was an aggressive person that cleared the way for me to go in and do what I had to do you know by any means necessary she was a leader he was a winner he's smart he kind of remind me of a hip-hop degree
08:36
in the 1980s so LA was probably the most successful black-owned record label in America dick Griffey who was the founder of the company was one of those men who had the rare ability I think to identify talent in people what I'm interested in is he's really teaching young people how to be in business for themselves shuch first came to see dick because he was managing a young guy named Mario Johnson PKA chocolate who had written a number
09:08
of songs on a vanilla Sal I did all of his songs at his kitchen table at his house me and quake would do tracks and I will go to his house and write give him songs and he would learn them he had gotten some credit on the album but they hadn't paid him it wouldn't return his phone calls I couldn't get in contact with him but the record wasn't doing anything at that time and then when the video hit be et is and when the records start taking off nothing happens so fast and it blew up so quick the first thing I want to do is tell me that we give you
09:38
a couple of dollars then let bygones be bygones I she came to me at the Palm Restaurant first and just sat down and said hello he's kind of nice you know it's kind of scared us but he was really intimidating I had like six or seven guys with him and it looked like a football team we already knew where he was staying because I was supposed to be hearing some tracks that he was going but for some reason they wanted me to just come by myself you know what I'm saying this shit's like why they just want you to go by yourself Darrell didn't try to beat you out of money they to beat you out of songs I'm going with you they hold out to Pryor was no he's not
10:11
going the antenna we're gonna do it like this and give him a check and y'all shut up I have a different program we met one day I went in my hotel room and he was in there and he's with several people and then he then he let me know what what he wanted and he wanted to get some points off the record you can't give me nothing it's what I'm gonna give you because you didn't get to rice to put it out - cuz I haven't got paid and my client never got paid I remember watching primetime live the interview with vanilla ice Suge took me out on the
10:42
balcony started talking to me personally he had me look over the edge show me how high I was up there are you scared I needed to wear a diaper on that day he didn't first of all hang me off from any balcony or any of this stuff okay the the story's been kind of blown out of proportion and and I want to clarify right now that Suge and I have no bad feelings or anything towards each other we had to sue EMI and Winkle to recover
11:13
that money and it was more than a year in the settlement that lawsuit there chocolate façade doesn't mean he didn't get it hung over the balcony but if he did it didn't make him go pay you can look at it like like I was an investor in Death Row Records with no return on my money Suge said well you know I got some other clients who also have written songs and produce records and they haven't been paid either he shows up on my doorstep with these two guys called doc and Drake
11:45
that was the started telling do see was the guy that came up with those great stories he was probably the single most influential person in gangsta rap Dre basically made with his records I mean you know he did the music he everyone who you don't know how to work with the artists and it was been him and ease his company together but then when easy man
12:16
Jerry Jerry can't man and X Dre out and saying you know Akai give you a little bit more money with this jus drein basically as a slave they had the worst contracts I've ever seen in the history of the record business contracts that ruthless and Jerry Heller had with NWA and Dre I guess if I said draconian that would be a kind word in the process of having a number of conversations with Doc and Dre the question came up about how can we be assured that we're gonna
12:49
get paid in the future Dick said look Dre if you can make records away you make records I'll show you how to start a company you won't have to worry about people paying you you'll have a company that you own a control I suggested that why don't you guys go and talk to easy and see if you can make a deal well Dre continues to produce easy for ruthless he continues to produce NWA and and the other acts I was consulting for ruthless for eazy-e working through
13:20
Jerry Heller one day Dre came and was shook to my office in Hollywood and simply said they had left ruthless we're starting their own company called decimal records it didn't go down it with poles too and so easy had to be persuaded to make the move to make things happen according to court papers Suge and Friends basically came in and told Eric and Jerry Heller Dre was leaving and they couldn't stop them and that this was not just legal it was
13:52
physical it was personal the stories that Eric he told was that they came in with baseball bats threatened done under threat of his life and told him that they would kill his mother and that they were holding me hostage under those kinds of duress got him to sign releases for dr. Dre I wasn't there I wasn't in the room but when eazy-e said in the papers than me and the chairman of Sony Tommy Mottola was in the room with bats and pipes he's obviously a liar there's no
14:23
question that we have substantial dr. Terry evidence of the conspiracy here Eric Wright ez filed a RICO lawsuit against them it was the first time we Co had been used in the music business where he goes to racketeering lawsuits the thing that they used to get the Mafia and they can't get the mafia leaders on anything else Jeezy's lawsuit contended that there was money laundering extortion threats and violent intimidation not only was it charged against Suge and death row for stealing what was their top producer dr. Dre
14:54
it was charged against Sony Music from day one this label was born amidst the controversy that involve violence the initial understanding was that doc and dre and dick and should would be partners of this company each one arm just thought it was at the beginning I got a lot of love for and there always will be a part of the family on strength that they took that chance
15:24
it's not like that is we had a name out there it's not like we had a lot of money to give them the money I gave came on my pocket back then sure it was like very behind-the-scenes and helpful and quiet humble non-visible he knew he didn't like cameras he was invisible invisible man his role was to handle the day-to-day business dealing with the artists dealing with distributors and record companies and what-have-you my job was to go in here and push these buttons and make the records after
15:54
everybody was following Dre because people knew that Dre was the man like everything that he touched was like you know gold or platinum abettor that's what everyone wanted to work with them he was actually the most bankable person at that time pretty much in the industry from the R&B rap standpoint everybody was taking direction from Dre as for us he knows what he's doing he just finished doing NWA albums this double and triple platinum so you have to have confidence in what you've seen you watch
16:26
this man make money Warren G was my best friend and Nate Dogg was my best friend so we formulated to one three and Warren G was the DJ I was a rapper Nate Dogg was seeing the hooks we didn't have drum machines math you know we had was records and turntables and a microphone Warren she called me on the three-way of light snow by that dre on the phone cuz he he liked the tape he want to work worse because he want a white bastard [ __ ] stop line and he said hello so it is he said is drink he said man that [ __ ] was dope I don't
16:57
want to give which you come to the studio Monday at that time it was a dream just to be in the same room with dr. Dre you know dr. Dre wants us to come to the studio where he is not a job up there if I didn't have a car I wanted to appreciate the game and accept everything I was offered to me and learn and just be a student at the time they were housed in in my building so they didn't have a lot of expenses you have to understand that the greatest expense in making a record is the studio time I didn't have a lot of knowledge about the
17:27
rap/hip-hop scenario so I kind of let them do their own thing some nights we used to stay up there all night and lead to like 5:00 6:00 in the morning I mean it had a special vibe up there you just wanted to be there even if he wasn't working on the song you just wanted to be there because I had that atmosphere it just was a spot to be it was right in the middle of Hollywood you know it was just a place to be for us and we was young and we never really had been out of the neighborhood and you know we was getting a chance to see it all wouldn't be in bright lights and this was the
17:58
same studio that uh Shalimar lakeside the whispers babyface that deal all them recorded all the albums in the same studios on a business level and on a day to day basis was merely existing that it seemed like they were trying to find somebody there I put some money into it or somebody to help them out money was hard to come by back then because it wasn't no structure it was no label and
18:30
Suge Knight did all he could do at the time as far as its you know going his pocket his bank account to get us money right in really had no money he was leaving NWA [Music] dick had made a deal with Suge Doc and Dre to sell him a recording studio video
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that was going to be something that they would own separate from the death row label because they wanted absolutely the Dale sure came along and said he had found somebody to help them finance the purchase of the studio so he's been a subject of speculation where they got their original funding and the FBI's continuing to look into this there are so many things you hear about this situation I tell you this Mike Harris was firmly planted in the middle of it well the news they used to call Mike The Godfather tonight the story of a man who
19:33
tried to murder his best friend at the same time he was attempting to win his way into Beverly Hills acceptance this is Michael Harris a man drug agents described as a major cocaine trafficker at the young age of 26 he had already made millions of dollars these are his roots the streets of South Central Los Angeles where he started pushing dope on street corners and hung with a blood street gang called the Bounty Hunter's in the drug world he is known as Harry
20:04
Oh Mike Harris was a known entity in our community you know he was this guy bigger than life because Mike Harris was in jail doing things prior to his incarceration he was very visible he had started doing numerous things in the community Harris built an organization that distributed cocaine in California Arizona Texas Michigan Illinois Iowa Indiana Missouri Louisiana Florida and New York investigators say he dealt so
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much cocaine major Colombian drug kingpins like Mario via Bona were obliged to deal directly with Harris but like a mob godfather Harris sought to legitimize his illness and fortune and gained Beverly Hills respectability I was not a drug dealer I was a person who decided to sell drugs but I also had another poll I decided that I didn't want to do that anymore so I took those proceeds in that various real estate admin assistant turned out to be quite
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awesome Mike Harris had a wonderful background in entertainment he I think he was the first African American ever to produce a Broadway show that was a smash and it gave Denzel Washington his start checkmate was the name of play to play opened on Broadway many of us African Americans have been on Broadway on the screen out front singing and dancing but very few of us yeah as producers I thought he was an entrepreneur in New
21:36
York I had no idea that he was in jail the first time I met Michael it was a drug case involving boban at Mario villa Bona that trial went and resulted in a number of convictions then went to trial in a federal court and after that case Michael I believe contacted David Kenner to have him represented on his appeal David Kenner was a long time in Los Angeles criminal attorney by the late 80s he had become part of a fraternity of top-flight attorneys that handled a lot of federal cases a lot of big drug cases downtown in the course of his
22:06
legal work he became Michael Harris's attorney I think if you look at clients of his over time he David has a habit of getting very close to his clients and getting very involved in his clients lives perhaps more so than would be wise for a lawyer David just you know fell in love with Mike when they became friends he was you know he was a you know I looked at him like family I was out in LA by myself and he like you know took me you know him and his family we go out to eat I mean we would like do
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everything together he became someone who was a confidant a friend of Michael Harris's and also involved in business with my virus I think that he's a lawyer we had a lot of money and it represented people we had a lot of money handed would not be unusual to me for somebody who represented people with money to say I want to invest every buddy wants to be in the
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music business and the years that I worked I've gotten tapes and offer us from everyone from politicians you know to businessmen who want to be in the entertainment business he started talking and I might say you dr. Dre and
23:38
should say yeah you know Mike said well we need to meet and [ __ ] so I got a couple of cases you know I can't be in the visit you so Mike said nah got this attorney he's bad he can get you any they've kind of brought Suge Knight to see Michael at a Metropolitan Detention Center in downtown Los Angeles sexy tape he told me that we could be 5050 partners about a billion five they
24:17
set down their basic business plan that they would start a company called father entertainment and it would be supposedly it was also their GF in the tape we
24:48
decided it would be the parent one day I see these two people walk in a building who I'd never seen before and one was David Kenner and the other was Lydia Harris in the summer of 1991 Kenner started coming around there was a lot of buzz about this company a lot of expectations that it could be a successful company and David was one of the people around at the time making a play to be shug's partner and to to take care of business for Suge to handle business for sure the couple days after mrs. Harris and David Kenner came in
25:19
things actually changed drastically immediately the studio gets carpeted things are getting fixed I'm trying to get any presented with money to find apartments for the artists that hadn't that didn't have any apartments didn't have any money I'm also giving allowance for them I saw a few little upgrades in the studio some chairs some some speakers and I was also told will be getting collect calls and to accept I'm in a fine check where he wasn't connecting we were saying with them to may build an awareness per godfather
25:50
entertainment and to kick off their first vehicle which is decimal records to the industry norman winner in His infinite wisdom said let's take the boys into Beverly Hills let's stick it in everybody's face so off to Chasen's [Music] [Applause] [Music]
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we were thinking about putting in metal detectors at the entrance everyone gets served with subpoenas as an invitation you're hereby ordered to appear before the honorable dr. Dre and the offices of GF entertainment as a guest of the court to witness the springing springing of Death Row Records we invited virtually every major record company executive in Los Angeles and New York and it was so
26:52
big that we originally planned on spending around 2025 thousand turns to be 35 or 50 they had enough money at that time behind him and they look for some money that comes out of nowhere to have a party at Chasen's on Grammy night with his reserve generally or all the way people it's also a place that would never be associated with rap music in any way unless it was something co-sponsored by a white people before us the west coast it's a lot of talent
27:24
around that guys we don't have the opportunity to have a chance to prove itself so for the tape it goes with the studio and the film we give it all to yesterday's opportunity from all the neighborhoods where basically we haven't forgot where we came from I personally interviewed all of the players over there GF Entertainment it was a multimedia company we have Death Row Records we have a movie production unit concerts we're gonna be doing pay-per-view concerts and all kinds of
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exciting things in the beginning they was giving Mike his problems and they was recognizing that there was another entity that helped this be one major powwow when it came to Dave Kenner he toasted the man who made it all responsible Harry oh the label started with dr. Dre what's gonna do is thing and with a lot of help from Suge Knight and Harry oh and a number of people and we got it all together and that's on tape and the FBI
28:24
confiscated that from me under very rude circumstances when death row was in the solar offices we pretty much gave over to the one floor there were a lot of sheet folks hanging out but it wasn't what it became unfortunately there was a there was a lot of a lot of tension an element showed up that my people were not accustomed to Drake had invited these
28:55
guys over to the studio when shoot Cade these guys were using the phone so they man get off the phone so the guy says to [Music] [Music] studio shot through the wall to scale
29:58
the hole is in the wall cops came and dug the bullet out George and Lynwood Stanley later sued night he agreed on a 1 million dollar settlement but only paid a third of it the company cover deep cover was in critical success it was the introduction of Dre as a solo artist the introduction of Trey as a mentor to other artists in this case Snoop Doggy dog one make seven on our Undercovers
30:33
cop [Music] by Snoop blowing up on Deep Cover I looked at that like we were all blown up cuz I always knew we did music together and always had confidence in our music that it was sale and it would sell worldwide and after the way it blew out was snooping it pumped me up to like man I can't wait til it's my time cuz they really do love what we doing that single is so significant because it shows these two different worlds that Trey was leaving and where he's going to dr. Dre wanted to make a statement that he was a
31:08
solo war that he was a good artist on his own and a good producer the thing back then was we gonna try to come up I saw Dre used to talk about his coming up coming up and the chronic was what we're supposed to set it off everybody put their all into the chronic album because we seen it not only was this gonna build a record company that we want because this was the first album off the record
31:38
company we want this we'll build all of our careers and we lied to straight whatever Dre was dreams write whatever you want you want just concept or you want this we want this is all about us all about confidence right right right right boom you had Snoop Dogg who just brought a whole nother style to rap me he has a voice where you can wrap over beats and just rip a beat to pieces and a lot of that [ __ ] was on-the-spot spontaneous right there just put weed you gotta like this break me down dig
32:09
that once we twist a [ __ ] up and blaze if mr. chronic we're gonna keep it is we unroll that moment first of all you had so many hungry starving individuals that you know wanting to be superstars who put they talent together and it came out to be a classic the camaraderie in the early days over there man all them cats used to show up to the studio they were poor as hell but they say our family still have fun so it wasn't like
32:42
we had money to hang with our friends or anything like that so we just hung him together and we created a masterpiece I [Music] think it was a lot of collaboration on a chronic album as far as names like dad's corrupt snoop Warren GDoc RBX and myself raised well we were all starting all starving
33:13
right including we'd be up there eating popeyes chicken five days a week I'm not gonna roll up to Jordan yeah we the best we you know send us why we made the chronic because we had to chronic I mean sometimes we just was in there you know drinking or elevating our minds to another level Dre be like working with the beats at the time and here come up with something and depending on who was in the studio at that particular time it was people waiting all over the world for their album for Dre's album to drop
33:44
the chronic was finished we had originally thought when we're gonna be able to distribute the record with Sony this would be the first time in history that young guys would have actually had opportunity to have a distribution deal what they call a PMD deal to amaze it and get all the money Sonny refused to distribute the chronic Sony because of their fearfulness of some of the crazy things going on around death row and their wariness of the the contractual status of dr. Dre didn't
34:16
want to get that deal done [Music] part of their fears in dealing with rap bands is that some of these gangsta rappers might turned out to be real gangsters indeed many of them re there's any number of these guys go to jail every year and it's like first thing that you know they go platinum then go to jail dick and I then negotiated a deal with BMG to fill out the record they heard the lyrics and they said we're not gonna put the record out everybody not afraid of putting out any kind of rap records with explicit lyrics had talked about killing cops and stuff
34:55
it was nobody out there wins I mean it was a time when we stopped a deal we had a lead I'm John McClane jr. came along when he heard the record he went crazy he said Griff you got it you got to give me this you know give me this record Johnson I love the record why don't you let me take it Tanner scope an opportunity appeared for a young aggressive label to distribute death row and to established industry
35:27
people to deal with Jimmy Iovine who was a superstar producer of rock records and Ted fields who had been a movie producer and produced some hit music they had some rather controversial acts of their own in Rock Nine Inch Nails they signed to back Shakur the other hottest rapper in the business Interscope was out of business they were given able to closed doors Juana's Atlantic was dropping the deal and Ted fields was tired of pouring his personal money in there so here
35:57
comes dick Griffey with the product dick and I went and met with Jimmy Iovine and they have a con and we played them the chronic and they said they were interested in making a deal so these guys told me he said look we're gonna advance two hundred thousand dollars well the meantime what was what was going on is there was no more money it was no cash flow Friday no money sadly no money sending on Monday Monday no Monday Tuesday they advanced $100,000
36:31
for which we had to sign I was alone by Wednesday she looking great up at Interscope Jimmy Iovine got ahold of Dre it's a see Dre they doing it to you again right these guys are taking advantage of you they then got in touch directly with Suge and said you know Griffey was here he won't make us a deal but you bring us some record we'll give you a million dollars the man once again had done the old divide and conquer it's real a lot of presidents in the business people
37:03
think it's so much black and white a lot of it is ya know most of our young people don't really know what's available for them out there so that's how they get taken advantage of all the guys or anything they wanna do is sit you down say look okay should you say you're young entrepreneur just what we gonna do give me all the stuff you got give me your tapes give me your masters give me your groups I'm gonna go ahead and make you a deal soup didn't know contracts he didn't know manufacturing
37:35
he didn't know publishing but you know my opinion was look I ain't no Punk you don't got time for us we don't gonna have to speak for ourselves instead of getting the dollar we want 5 you know our masters and our ownership what they ended up with is going over to Interscope and getting one of those regular slave deals they took the kids away from nest of some Interscope clearly saw the money and this is the record business and and I think they were smart enough to see that whoever
38:06
this guy should not was and knowing the track record of this producer dr. Dre you had the legal mind of Dave Kenner there they've got all tools in place everything that we need is right here we don't really have to do anything we have to fund these guys and do what we do which is promote Records market records and advertise records Jimmy Iovine had to go pay off ruthless easy Jerry hello and have the chronic distributed through Priority Records easy was getting andres
38:37
chronic record like 50 cent a copy and maybe 25 cent meaning yeah Dre day he talking [ __ ] about me but everytime Dre day sell a record I get 25 cent a copy after they sign the agreement I think they realize that they needed to leave and they did all of a sudden I disappear she'll cut off all ties with you know the people he was dealing with in the beginning and we got a whole new office and a whole new crew and that really became kind of the the rupture of the relationship between dick and Suge and
39:08
Doc and Dre the chronic rolls out in cells 5 million copies generates fifty million dollars the saved Interscope made in scope we invented something that wasn't out there so it was fresh and everybody wanted it from the east coast to the west coast period you couldn't turn on MTV without seeing dr. Dre first time I perform songs for the chronic with dr. Dre and we did like a small
39:40
little concert and copter man my father singing every word of the songs and they made me feel like dead this is my life right here to me it wasn't like okay draya's is advocating everybody's smoke weed he wasn't saying that he was saying my album is dope you understand I'm saying my album is dope by it it was a good record I know a lot of cast that's pissed off behind those records right now cuz they say they haven't been paid or didn't get credit for it I like to them I mean it was I was surprised but I was happy with
40:10
it I think I still play it from time to time I like this and his voice on this [ __ ] but I still listen to it if you understand you know what was going on in the street at that time and even now word of mouth is everything and death drove became really hip on the street every young black entertainer wanted to be a part of it so there was no problem finding talent at all there was an understanding at death row that they weren't getting at the major
40:42
companies one of the things about these major labels they'll never understand street music they'll never understand stuff that starts right there in the neighborhoods they'll never understand it never will never will never will that's why you'll always have some young entrepreneurs who will come along who really understand how to do that and make a killing not Hollywood you know if you see me out somewhere can we come over there see your hook talk to you how you doing whatever you'll speak to me I
41:11
hang on to no let's do that steel from the ghetto it was a very very good time for young kids looking for a break there was an opportunity there there were people there that understood them understood what they were about the kids would come in and when our audition right off the street basically the same thing Motown did they took the mindset the spirit that dreams the hopes and wishes and thoughts of the people of a time Kurt and they set it to music if anybody would really stop for a moment to analyze what really happened at death row it's really a miracle you have a
41:45
company a small company run by a young black entrepreneur and he releases five or six LPS and all of them went at least I think double platinum now it's a known effect in our industry if you're working for a major and you release ten LPS and you have three to four hit records out of the ten that you release you're considered a genius I think the most important thing of my situation that I wasn't Coast I think if a person is Coast about the business they the team that makes the
42:17
same mistakes the other entrepreneurs been making all alone the appeal of Death Row Records and everybody wanted to join Death Row Records at the time was the fact that Suge Knight was a black man with a lot of power and he was a fearsome individual that's the type of person you want on your team should Knight is an intimidating individual when he enters a room you notice him you can't help it I think that he would be considered a handsome man huge man shoots tremendous size intimidated people when you got a 300-pound guy saying something it means
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a lot more than if you have Mickey Rooney so he sure was bright enough to use his size much like Don King uses his hair the hype got so big that everybody started fearing I have friends are at Sony okay one calls to G you know we really want to get a track you do me a favor could you go talk to sugar I'll talk to him it's not went over to see [ __ ] I said [ __ ] what is it you doing you got people out here that are afraid to talk to you Joe became somewhat like a folk hero after a while these stories just develop
43:20
a life of their own you guys should doing everything from throwing people off of a 30-story building to you know putting rocks and hearing them in cement the media they they put bad names on people and you know try to run they dragged a name through the dirt whatever but now as an individual you got to do what you gotta do to get pay he was a very brilliant businessman whatever his tactics might have been whoever had to step on and get there his main objective was to just get there at any cost there's a genius which
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is a part of him and you know what they say about geniuses you know and far from being insane Suge Knight pretty much blew his cover by appearing on the cover of magazines because now you're no longer a figure behind the scenes now you're celebrity you're making yourself when snoops album
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comes out this is the most anticipated rap album in history doggy's down was we through what the chronic it's all about you know you're the hottest thing coming out to west coast in a long time it's Ray Vaughn producing and when Dre produce out from top to bottom you can't go tell us what we should expect them new album we're here at our records in Marina del Rey where this is really the hottest album on the shelves right now since the album was released
45:00
at midnight last night at this store they've already sold 130 CDs and about a hundred cassettes it could be the hottest album ever get it before it's gone nobody had ever in the modern era had their very first album go number one triple platinum album was thirty million dollars to the record label it's more like 45 million dollars on the retail level death row became the core of Interscope which became the core of Warner Brothers music money-making
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machine after the snoop album came out it was all great cuz man Daryl was flying high Dan it was just so much money floating around there fro for anything I mean I used to keep thousand dice to run through thousands of dollars a day they're making a hundred million dollars a year they can buy anything they want they can buy anybody they want that made it all very very serious business rappers didn't give gangster rap its
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name the music industry gave gangster rappers name they said this music has cussin in it they're calling women [ __ ] so that's gangster rap because he comes from the gangs and the gangsters gangsta rap isn't something that was just born and invented in the quote-unquote ghetto it's something that you see American movies the glorification of Al Capone Lucky Luciano that's kind of glamorous
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in any Americans I think it really puts the truth of society out in front of America in America not used to that is obviously gonna be shocked about it was
47:09
they just started rapping about the six o'clock news would it be gangsta rap gangster rap is like the movies - drama sells I take it for what it is it's a record it's a CD it's a tape you know and I'm not gonna live my life by it and other people shouldn't either it's entertainment no black man should get on the front of a magazine with a 12-inch cigar from the two rolls-royce's when what could be considered gang colors in America that sends a bad message that's that's negative publicity
47:41
when it was negative played a role also because it was part of this role that Suge Knight had chosen for the company I mean these kids were not gangsters quote real gangsters many people there were not as a matter of fact gang members like it has been portrayed in the press you know there were people around that were when you got brothers it's you know perpetrating gang violence or gang affiliation and they make it cool that's a problem that could be a problem it wasn't just death row
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perpetuating the violence I think it was the media I think I mean let's face it the coverage was just awesome all of a sudden death row and gangster rap was the reason that every youngster in America was going bad lyrics that promote rape murder racism drug abuse and violence died died died Pig died
48:45
crime Warner's music division promotes music that celebrates the rape torture and murder of women see Delores Tucker is a political activist that in bodies herself in matters of african-american decency questions in the beginning she was trying to protect America from the threat No gangster rap words but by that point the cat was out of the bag and there's very little that she could have
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done she involved herself in Time Warner politics along with a odd political bedfellow for her who was William Bennett the moral obtuseness of Time Warner we do not understand why they don't get it these are right-wing conservatives both of them they are would be censors both were attacking Time Warner along with Dole a line has been crossed not just of taste but of human dignity and decency and you've got a
49:48
presidential candidate accusing Time Warner of debasing the nation for handling death-row product the mainstreaming of demons he must come to an end and I think we do have problems with the social fabric of this country right now I do have trouble believing that it is caused by song lyrics or movies time warner was also doing iced tea they got tea off the label but they were stuck with death row and numbers are so huge they didn't know what to do with it they just put 120 million dollars into it they're getting all that money out and then and then some they can't be
50:20
seen by any of their artists to given a political pressure whatsoever if you do that they'd never get another act again and no self-respecting manager would ever side with the label who they thought could be pressured for content we african-american women particularly are tired of being called hoes [ __ ] and [ __ ] by our children who are paid to do this by Time Warner she came up with an idea that she reportedly pitched
50:50
a fuchs that what if she started a label a positive rap label and got Suge to distribute death-row product through her with her as the watchdog of the lyrical content to make sure that the messages were positive michael Fuchs reportedly desperate to try and figure out a solution to this apparently listen to her she got Fuchs to guarantee eighty million dollars if
51:15
she could pull this off you know scope was not better to let death row go without a fight Suge Knight also protected those artists lyrically and I made sure that no everyone was allowed to say wherever the hell they wanted to say whatever happens who's lost and appalled and they'd be more successful poor thing anybody doing is making us far more and better no way he was gonna let see Lawrence Tucker decide the lyrical content
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a Snoop Doggy dog album that wasn't gonna happen but they apparently thought it was michael Fuchs reportedly flew to Los Angeles in the time warner jet - Dionne Warwick's house where si Delores Tucker's sitting there waiting for Suge Knight to come over to cut a deal that that would make it tamed Death Row Records what she really wanted was a record company or to have more involvement in that business I mean it is a very lucrative business she had the wherewithal to see where this rap situation was going how it had
52:24
the nation really sort of unnerved she was just trying to parlay it into something for herself where she had been promised that it would be something for herself never never have I discussed 80 million dollars with him about any kind of business deal the story goes that they waited five hours michael Fuchs see Louis Tucker and and at the on Warwick's house that Suge never showed up Suge went right back to Interscope and said do you know what these guys just tried to pull so Interscope then
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promptly sued Time Warner and promptly sued see Delores Tucker Prater fairing with their contractual relationship Time Warner has decided to get out of the gangster rap business by selling its 50% share of Interscope Records back to that company made the right decision the morally responsible decision we think and we believe that by their action divesting themselves of Interscope at some financial loss they have set a standard for the entire entertainment industry I commend the board I think they are going to be a good corporate
53:28
citizens Death Row Records was at the center of her controversies and if the Republicans are that their way would have brought down a president that's how big the controversy gosh the origins of death row starting with David Kenner Michael Harris and Suge Knight didn't seem out of the ordinary until all the information started falling because David Kenner nobody knew who he was David Kenner became the principal business attorney for the label as well as the criminal attorney
54:04
for many people at the label Los Angeles police announced the 21-year old Calvin Broadus that are known as rap star Snoop Doggy Dogg had turned himself in to police on Friday along with two other young black man all accompanied by an attorney in connection with the murder on August 25th of a man named Phillip Waldo Mario and what police believe was a gang-related shooting it never should have gone to trial the alleged victim in this case had a gun was reaching to his waistband to pull that gun out at the time snoops bodyguard did fired a shot
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and that's what we said from the beginning the testimony makes it clear this is a case of self defense the DA pain and ass he just tried to do every day in the world to make me seem like the most negative gang banging his criminal mind a more funky just imagined and tried to paint a picture of me that just wasn't happening it was crazy knowing that he was that's what his job was to do was to get me locked for life you understand I just want to say [ __ ] you [ __ ]
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Dave Kenna was the guy who legally made silk secure one of the benefits Suge Knight gave to people that joined death row was to say that I have a legal team people who have a lot of experience in the criminal arena that can help you whereas in the past coming from a black community you go into a white justice system where all the cards are stacked against you here for the first time in
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most of their lives they were given a lawyer who was very capable and an investigator on top of it and the results spoke for themselves most of the time they got to see instances where they were acquitted and and cases which normally they would have been convicted and the rap industry the problems happen at 1:00 or 2:00 in the morning so it's not a nine-to-five job David was the rare lawyer who would be available to clients at that hour of the 70 or 80 million dollars that Interscope paid
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them between 1995 and 1997 about 13 million of that went to the Law Offices of David Kenner or today McKenna certainly this company was his bread and butter for some time David Kenner [Music] his play I was quite surprised because you would expect the music business attorney but he wasn't he was a criminal attorney he had entertainment attorney quality you know he's flamboyant and he sharp and he you know and he's kind of mafia ish you know his whole persona
56:51
after a while David might have a got so caught up in this lifestyle that he might have become somewhat confused because the thing is is David really was supposed to be working on getting Mike out David was handling Michael's appeal David was involved it very much in Lydia's life was it was friends with Lydia this was a person who was very trustworthy to him when I thought man Mike is making a ton of money and then you see Dave Kennedy so you say if Dave
57:22
is there then Mike is there and then the story starts flashing and then you know that there's a war going on it was rumors that you know she was over there trying to get a deal at Interscope but when he would go down to visit Mike him and kennen would say it wasn't true Mike say hey what's this in the newspaper and and she would say oh they do you know how to newspaper print up articles so Mike Jewell they're not gonna just print up anything so we start asking David you know what's going on then David came and said should did this behind my back then
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that started to cause Michael concern about what exactly was going on he started to get word that the Shogun was telling people how Michael Harris is nobody he's not my partner and the word on the street was Michael Harris is really pissed off with show gets on he want to hit all the credit which might don't trip the critic the world thinks that show did this on his own myself for my time in the Mike's in jail but he's got a wife she's got a kid you know he's got family out here he's got
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people he's taking care of so you know his reaction is he's stunned then he's kind of mad about it you know you know how you gonna Punk me the phone was never blocked because we always had cats calling from the pan Harry Oh wasn't the only one but after a while I even remember and I think it was because of Harry that they didn't block the phone where it couldn't take no more calls David Kenner started off to play
59:04
these guys against each other once the rift between sugar and Mike happened Dave Kenner had a pledge allegiance one way or the other throughout this time even if should was denying his partnership with Michael denying that Michael had any role in the company David would be going up to visit Michael and saying oh no everything's okay there's there's no problem everything's fine we're gonna get this taken care of it reminds me of the Brutus and Caesar at some point Michael gets all of the incorporation paperwork
59:35
of death row records I realizes that Suge and David Kenner had set up a different company of Death Row Records that was independent of this GF Entertainment Michael had had a hand in and I think Michael began to suspect that things were not so kosher with their their partnership he the one told Dave hey look at this man that guy shoot I like him go talk to him okay I'll wreck economy okay I viewed some out of money you tell him to do this okay then hit me sugar talking she's
01:00:07
going to visiting she'll check this up put it down like this man put it down like that you do David you do this part keep him out of jail you makes you keep him out of jail as I shared that all the probation stuff Dave fighting like he crazy keep my Uncle Mike challenging to keep my to jail but guess what soon the money coming in who hereö they turned the scooby-doo one you know Mike said where's the money and they said you know it's gonna be 60 to 90 days you know before we see a royalty
01:00:37
check so those sixty and ninety days turned into a year I went over met with a david korn he said well you know what they don't pay you and I told him I'm not threatening you but I'm gonna go on national TV and tell what really happened everybody knew hereö wasn't no joke okay everybody knew Harry all had chips all you got to do is be no joke and have chips and you can get somebody handle
01:01:09
that's when Michael typed up a letter Michael put his concerns on paper in the form of a lawsuit that could have been filed that was never filed laying out his grievances as to how he had been a founding partner in death row records and had been denied his fair share of the proceeds that lawsuit was shown to Interscope and Interscope paid a fairly generous settlement to make it go away before it ever got filed that next a I
01:01:43
got a call they told me that Mike was in like a wheelchair his office twisted I mean he couldn't even walk he couldn't even use his hands he can do nothing I said what happened and that's when the doctor said he had Killian Beret and I asked Mike I said we did you know can't give you anything is as smooth as you want to be as vicious as you want to be given the scenario I started thinking least to
01:02:20
myself that she was getting herself caught up into too many situations that were unhealthy he had created an image that was working for him and sometimes the image merged with reality I'm not sure that it's time went on that should didn't draw a line between when there was the image when there was the reality shoot wasn't a gangster she came from a family his mother and father are still together he was a college football player I think I got a whole whole lot
01:02:54
of street cred building street smarts and at the same time I graduated from college you know I hit the books and I put both them together he ran a company like it was his game that's his family he may not love us but
01:03:26
he made us think he did a lot of what followed in part had to do with trying to establish death row as label with the most street credibility and we're really doing gangsta rap and we're keeping it real and we're keeping it legitimate and so when you guys get off the joint you can come get a job with me that sort of thing I never had a job before in my life until I started working for Sue you know in and out of jail you know I'm saying did a little bit every time you know I'm saying now you know yeah a lot of them cast I was up there was fresh
01:03:57
out of the penitentiary with that penitentiary mentality it was like working at a prison with no guns no knives no none you just had to be a nail y'all in handling how many companies do you know can have some Crips and bloods up there Crips and bloods at first I was
01:04:28
totally with deference concept because it was about time we had a brother out there man and one taking oh [ __ ] from these companies that one tan brothers day money so I was totally withered it was when the nonsense got too out of hand we had a system of that kind of thing sort of like a demerit system for artists and so on and for some of the office worker I just knew how after a while sure was
01:05:00
unapproachable you couldn't really talk to him no more you know I just I just knew he was no more talking to this guy man this guy is the [ __ ] man that company was by no ways forms or fashion Hollywood you know white folks like to do they like to scream at each other dinner I'm gonna get my lawyer on you but the new brothers wasn't doing it like that it was coming through those coming through windows and the whole nine old people you know these rappers
01:05:31
are from the street they're not used to nothing so you you have to deal with him in the street mentality I heard somebody once described them as all thinking they were in a Godfather movie she was famous would apply in the old mafia tactics you instill fear and everybody one guy just walks in he wants too long he has no idea when the mill over me he wants a record he walks and he says he not a rap so she says okay rap you if you we don't like what you do we gonna kick your life
01:06:00
he said make you three words they just I've seen people get beat up you understand I've seen people get that dough locked on them the FM is dough locking well they take you in a room and touch you up and down I wasn't the only lady that got beat up Bob's the only lady beat up and he held down shook grabbed me by my feet and everything went away this girl cold-cocking she loosened up
01:06:34
my teeth and I had two black eyes David Kenner stood up and watched somebody else videotaped it and I kicked sugar and his nuts and I got the hell up out of there I have not laid eyes on shuck since that day he won't lay eyes on me - he see this all that drama that people knew that was happening right there different
01:07:05
on that 12th floor this is at the building right down here to UCLA on Wilshire it never leaked over to the Interscope sighs you know you see the Interscope Interscope looks nice woody dancing Interscope Records they get any reception death row is just a door it was just a hog a need or colored door with a camera dark and RBX both had problems with sure they seen what type of person he was on the inside not just saying that bad and I just say nothing
01:07:36
good about him but they see any type of person he was it through the grace of God and get attorneys they were able to leave everybody else was forced in a chokehold after day Tupac Shakur was not before his time but one of a kind of his time and era he was a movie star and for him to be doing Street stuff gave him like sort of a Marlon Brando edge the outlaw who was living life in some
01:08:06
romantic earnest Hemmingway world where you lived out your art you have that almost uncontrollable defiant attitude I got a big mouth came out I've talked to my heart I'm real you know I'm saying without the cops comes but my controversy probably and it's not my fault I'm trying to find my way in the world you know I'm trying to be somebody instead of just make money off everybody to parks gift was the ability to take somebody else's pain and story and translate it we as rappers brought that violence we bought the violence that we've seen on the street we put in our records put in
01:08:38
our records for years and after three four years people watch the pawnee starting to see it because all the statistics that's going on in the streets if we stop talking about it then they wouldn't take statistics and when they stop taking statistics then we'd be killing each other in the street is why people won't care no more he would definitely give you something to think about I know some of y'all white folks do some of y'all black folks don't appreciate what we talk about but it's the only way we got to make money and if you don't let me make my money on the streets I guarantee I would make my money on the streets a lot of people say the same things or have said the same
01:09:09
things as puck but Tupac made it believable but at first I always thought he was just crazy arrogant little idiot but I didn't really know how deep he was we have to be honest about the tools that we use to survive and why is a black life any any more recoupable in a white life you know I'm saying we know that they don't put the same security and then get what they do and the wife and and the white neighborhoods what I saw in two Park was someone who had a
01:09:41
desire to be successful and he only had two or three avenues one was rapping one was acting and the other was going into the movement that his family came out of some other was a black panther all of the anger frustration and everything that she was dealing with in what was going on with her at that time in her life was feeding right into him when Tupac was a kid for punishment she would
01:10:14
make him read the New York Times cover to cover and at the end of the day he would be quizzed on everything he ran out of the paper Tupac well aware of what his mother had gone through brought that into the 90s because nothing had changed in the 60s - - as far as he saw with his race of people I don't know how to be responsible for every black male D I don't know I guess I am gonna say then I'm a thug that's because I came from the gutter and I'm here I'm not saying I'm a thug cuz I
01:10:46
want to rob you with rape people and things I'm a businessman I mean you know I'm a businessman because you find me at my places of business t-back was a star at Interscope and Interscope had their hands full with him it was in in jail and in trouble he just had got beat up by the police he had a lawsuit going at him that he wanted he was getting just harassed for anything I mean you know they just start throwing him on the nose as the bad guy rap when he really wasn't that person I appreciate the presence you giving me
01:11:17
for giving me a fair trial and a fair shot of justice I thank you from the bottom of my heart for just destroying everything I worked for for the past 22 years and a Happy New Year to you too Tupac was in the news every day I mean you can't buy that kind of publicity it's unfortunate the kinds of media coverage that they got but it added to sales people that know Park had like 15 cases in different states in America we will go do a show pockle go straight to court soon as we get off the airplane
01:11:48
great artists are almost always out of step with what's going on in society because they see the world differently and they act differently the last situation he got into Interscope kind of like left him for dead they wasn't really felt on the park like that Shakur and another man were accused of sexually assaulting and sodomizing a 21 year old woman in their hotel room last year it's not a crime for me to be with any girl I want to be with it's the crime for that girl to turn that into a rape charge it was her who sodomized me it wasn't me
01:12:19
who went down in a dance club and ate her out it was her in a dance club who she should be charged not me last night just after midnight that's 723 seventh Avenue that's between 48 and 49th Street the rap star Tupac Shakur and three members of his group were robbed and shot word on the streets is that it was a warning to Tupac who was it coming from in a bizarre twist of events rap singer Tupac Shakur checked himself out of
01:12:51
Bellevue Hospital late Wednesday night after the 23 year old was shot five times early that same morning inside the lobby of a Time Square recording studio core it appeared in court today but had little to say about being shot after three days of deliberations the jury has finally decided the fate of rapper Tupac Shakur guilty on three counts of sexual abuse he now faces one and a half to four and a half years in prison the main impetus for the incarceration of mr.
01:13:21
Shakur was from City Hall mr. Giuliani himself 23 being black and last name being Shakur in America he never had a chance to puck was in jail and he wanted out of jail and he wanted out of jail badly no one including here in the scope was putting up any bail money to get him out in his bill was set at 1.4 million dollars a lot of people in the East Coast live in New York City distant Hardman he dissed them on the radio and no one went to go visit him
01:13:52
except for a few people and he wanted to be number one again so where else do you go but to where the other number one people are death row records had been trying to get Tupac for some time if you got Suge Knight dangling in front of you you know freedom freedom money power respect get you to jail I was gonna go for you got a scared young man first time behind bars he's supposed to be back there for four years the plot promised him in return you get me out of here I'll put death row on the map my
01:14:24
first CD or cell six million copies and I don't think it's a coincidence that shook wanted him on different records so badly because even though snoop was a huge star he didn't have what Tupac had that kind of icon presents like a James Dean or or Elvis now I heard that he had parks on a contract on toilet paper I don't know how true it is but I know when pop came back he was ready to pot got out of September of 95 he went to Death Row
01:14:55
Records this day he got off the plane and they laid down their first track for all eyes on me in 15 minutes this album is more celebratory your life upbeat energetic fun I think but it's also harsher in terms of the language because I didn't I've been in jail for 11 and a half months Tupac brought the feeling of I was nothing now I'm something and I want everybody else to be something too if I could do what you can do it he stirred up the whole group there he got them all
01:15:26
going and all working he made sure that every artist at death row had some part of this double CD it was his way of saying look I'm part of the family and I want you on my album which he did not have to do like I'm never doing a session with him you know and it seemed like you just run around having fun party you know having a good time but the man was done we thought that he didn't even write him we thought he came with his lyrics already but no he wrote him that day and that's just how sharp he was man you happy around studio saying man we gotta get like pok pok this going and kicking me and kick him
01:15:58
out kicking me he come out and that's all they talk about and exactly that they do it he made the level of competition which is a good thing he brought that level up any of the artists will tell you that what to pot put into them was this this business of the work ethic where you can do more if you just work at it when Tupac came is like chill when word about nobody else not snoop nobody at the time nobody even cared about it and others at the time
01:16:27
mr. Park Assist it's such a tease and disguise the workaholic a little girls he didn't want nothing all he wanted was to go to school and go to work he wanted to take his experiences melatonin to park got out of jail Sean puffy combs was about to become I would say the East Coast version of Suge Knight with Bad Boy Records you know his first big
01:16:59
artist mr. notorious b.i.g this [ __ ] about the East Coast and the west coast started when we went out to New York to do the source Awards and mr. Knight went on stage and he's in New York City and we all know Puffy's from New York City anyone is out there I want to be an artist I want to stay on star you don't want to I'm gonna have to worry about the same producer trying to be all in the videos all on the record dancing come a deathblow
01:17:30
[Music] I mean the whole crowd store boring and then I thought to myself like why would you do that the East Coast don't love dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg the East Coast ain't got no love for dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg and death row gotta love us y'all don't love us let it be no need [Applause] we're even [Applause]
01:18:07
i don't think- producer that i comment was made about a little bit earlier the cards check this out contrary to what other people may feel i would like to say that I'm very proud of dr. dre of temporal edge to tonight for their accomplishments and all this east and west that need to stop it was so personal puffy was a good friend of mine there's enough room in this business for two young black males who are entrepreneurs to exist I mean can you imagine if al Bell and Barry Gordy were fighting or if
01:18:39
the temptations had beef with the fort I mean it sounds [ __ ] [ __ ] when you think about it you know the four towns got beef with the temptations Marvin Gaye smokey Roberts who were fighting at the Grammy Awards last night I mean think about that for a second a lot of people on the west coast felt that we have always had I had love for the East Coast you know they can come here and break the records they come here and play at the clubs you know they come to in stores we do the whole nine with some east coast cats and we go out there and we don't get that same love I remember
01:19:11
New York DJ's at parties refusing to play West Coast records they country their bamas they were Jheri curls they can't rhyme they're wack is not danceable it was the media that blew it up you know you're seeing certain things that somebody said highlighted in magazines about the West Coast and vice versa and it just just pulled over from there so all these people talking about it East Coast West Coast war they like the Judas was to Jesus they only here to cause confusion it may rap music look
01:19:41
bad it may rap music look like it's just another part of the dope game controversy is what death row started living off of instead of talent if this was chess we'd be Yellin checkmate three [ __ ] years ago cuz we've been beat these [ __ ] in a disrespect to started getting worse and worse between the west coast and the East Coast overthrow the government y'all got right now which is bad boy and knives and all that [ __ ] and we will bring a new government here that will feed every person in New York and then you had to park and big situation you know flaming and even
01:20:13
more I possess his soul there's an [ __ ] they know that I was getting snigger involved with biggie success I was the biggest help I was truly I don't like his run but you know how much he's bothered for me he know how like stop my souls let him touch the show let him blow up and do this whole show in the middle of my show I watched to fire him [ __ ] and give him [ __ ] never asked for a bath how I used to [ __ ] like to share my experiences in the game of my lessons and my rules and my knowledge on the game with him you know what I mean he only more the only mourn in the turn
01:20:43
of hair and act like you didn't know [ __ ] was about to blow my [ __ ] head off he knew but for me to know like three weeks ago this happened and then three weeks later your albums coming out and you are [ __ ] done in your album but you don't know shot in your [ __ ] alternative sneakers from your neighborhood and I gotta find out by myself and I'm [ __ ] and I don't even call myself a dumb just a capo from the Westside I'm on the east side in jail and I know who touched me and I know everything that happens to pot was wrong and blaming where the individual figures were who actually had something to do
01:21:14
with it in New York and making it into this whole New York City thing and then this East Coast West Coast thing and I think that he definitely had someone in his ear probably should exacerbating it it sells records it continues to get media attention which sells more records 2pac had claimed to have gone out with the Big East wife Faith Evans this was a great humiliation reportedly for biggie it was all over we were in Manhattan shooting a video biggie smalls had
01:21:47
gotten on the radio station and biggie said that I cannot believe that New York is allowing Tupac and the Dogg Pound to shoot a video in our city right in the heart of Times Square the words out of Biggie's mouth was Tupac and the dolphin and it wasn't it was snoopin the dog pound Tupac was not with us Snoopy at the time was having his hair braided and although the artist was in the trailer and all of a sudden gunfire someone shot
01:22:17
into the trailer they weren't shooting in there to say you know get out they were shooting there to kill someone there was a shift in Tupac Shakur's lyrical content he at first was more political than at some point he became more Street it was West Coast versus East Coast the person at Rikers Island was very reflective and he's gonna change his life and everything this new person was like [ __ ] New York [ __ ] the East Coast sugars the man he takes care
01:22:48
of me he's flashing money in front of the MTV cameras it was like wow I was check going high one of the songs of the song called hit him up it talked about killing the bad boy camp you know different artists it was a lot of threats little part I could do did you hear what you said it was like yeah [ __ ] I wrote it okay we're gonna need some more security and you need to start wearing a vest he can
01:23:19
you have this synergy between two or more people and they make things happen when you start breaking that up things are never the same again when you think about dr. Dre here's a cat who's always had some sort of big brother or father figure around him early on it was Alonzo Williams then it was easy Jerry Heller then it becomes Suge Knight and so Dre was one of those cats who always needed guidance from someone else because Dre is really an artistic person artists he's a true artist seemed like after a while somebody was pulling his strings
01:23:50
you know like Dre had the answer to somebody we all know that was the king ie Suge Knight felt the need to have the court around him and I don't think Dre felt comfortable with that I've got all these people around me how many of them do I really need to park and dr. Dre was fine in the beginning everything was great I mean you didn't see any problems from the time that I worked there at 95 up
01:24:20
until early 96 dr. Dre had been in the studio twice Pok - offense to that he was the producer see producing the beats like on my other [ __ ] he's doing the beat his right was getting a credit dance and all the other look to shoes and sass and all the ones we have and they did the tracks train wasn't doing the tracks and trading write the lyrics should basically took on the role for a to part that he had taken on it for Dre and I don't think it's the coincidence
01:24:52
at a certain point you know too far I started becoming the mouthpiece for Suge I started dissing Dre he is a dope producer but he ain't working years I'm out here the streets you know I mean whooping [ __ ] that start wars and [ __ ] putting it down dropping albums doing my city this [ __ ] taking three years to do one song I seem to change like right after we finished murder was the casing we moved into can-am Studios started working on a dog food out I just seen that he wasn't as inspired and it was
01:25:22
like it was too many thugs and [ __ ] updated and had to do with nothing it was mostly just the way the studio was you know and that's where I have to spend most of my time it was not a work atmosphere any more it became fun and game and the success that kicked in and we were stars and [ __ ] just loved being around us and bringing [ __ ] around us and Dre wasn't for day I just didn't like some of the things that were going on there was nothing being done to stop it trading bikes to work in an environment where he can create and everybody's on the creative atmosphere and it's not about what's going on in the hood how
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many [ __ ] you shot how much [ __ ] you did and did anything you know won't that she took over the company it was no mystery to nobody I don't think Dre wanted to be a yes-man for somebody so he wanted his own situation again so he bailed out he says wait I want out of this world I want to form aftermath where I'm not part of death row anymore I want to be beyond that I want to give my family I want to live when dr. Dre left several records that
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was the biggest shock to me because I was real confused at how you start a label and you leave the label I always figured if you had a problem with somebody and when you're labeled you make them leave the label and you go on what you're doing I guess that was the way of learning that it wasn't all his label straight departure wasn't a loss I mean if you have a multi-million dollar company maybe worth of being dollars or so and you own the 100% and don't have a
01:26:55
partner and you'd have to give him nothing but his walking papers that's great Dre made Death Row Records you know saying and this is absurd that he's gone from one situation to another situation where he feels like he's being under compensated to give a 50% of your label and move on elsewhere from a dangerous situation which Death Row Records was becoming and we now find out that it is with a smart move for him September 7th we were just leaving a fight to Park Mike Tyson friends we had
01:27:35
to fight and we go backstage to leave the building immediately after coming from backstage one of shug's homeboys came up and whispered after Tupac see or pop took off running there was a gentleman standing with a MGM security guard by a pillar as to pot was approaching him now when I think about it the guy was standing there waiting and it popped her in upon him in a fight broke out Orlando Anderson
01:28:06
and a couple of sheriffs homeboys it gotten into a fight at the Lakewood mall in California back in April of 96 over a death row chain because there was a bounty on the death row chains the same person that had gotten into altercation with Orlando Anderson in the mall whispered into Tupac's ear and it caused this fight they were beating Orlando Allison up on the ground
01:28:37
to pot should an arrest of the entourage there are pretty much bragging about what had happened we get back to the alexa hotel we go up to a Tupac's room he changed clothes come back downstairs we're all just standing around and all the women are coming out everybody's ready to you know go over to a six six to the after-party so Tupac turns to me and says no don't ride with us he hands me the keys and says you go drive low homies because we're going to the club gonna be partying and you're gonna drive us so I
01:29:09
said okay parking should get into the BMW we get back on to the Las Vegas Strip shows the lead car I'm the car right behind them there's just cars all behind us so we turn right off of Las Vegas Boulevard on to Flamingo to go down to six six - as we approach the next stop light which is Koval in flamenco there is a car coming down the open lane that is next to myself and to
01:29:39
be inducted as the car is approaching a turn and I look to my right and I see the car and it's a white Cadillac it kind of had moved over and I would say closer to the BMW probably about that close and arm just comes out and just starts fine hurt the South being 5-pocket it stood up to try to get in the backseat to get out to where the sides that's how you
01:30:13
got shot in his hip was hitting on the bones and travel to his room I grabbed him said get out and cover me I pulled him down that's why I got shot in my end so you hit me Sam hid from driving like a madman to a hospital and the first thing he said laughingly jokingly loudly is I need the hospital you don't wanna sign him coming up next on the 10 o'clock news his lyrics his
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life reflected a gangster lifestyle tonight Bay Area rapper Tupac Shakur is dead of gunshot wounds then all over the media all over the news all over the radio hundreds lined the streets outside a Nation of Islam school to pay their respects to the slain rapper the first things I started hearing the rumors that Shugart had Tupac's shot because Tupac was thinking of leaving the industry and I and I started a lot of fun I heard that I said you know the problem with this is is why would someone like Suge have the shooter shoot across the car so
01:31:16
that the bullets would hit him there are so many different layers of the story and it's so tragic Tupac Shakur is one of those those kids who was really one of the great creative forces of our agency it wasn't just a rapper he was a kid was really insightful he has said I didn't want to go to Vegas anyway because almost didn't even come that day was gonna happen who's the destiny of his life he had to thought of not going but he went because his destiny was to die in it next day
01:31:48
and it's just a shame that another brother gets lost as a victim on his music he had any street sense knowledge about yourself you knew that company was gonna come crashing down fans first people let the fame go to their hands and the egos to go over it the next thing you know it was it was nowhere to go but down coming
01:32:19
up will the founder of one of rap music's most successful record labels be doing time for a probation violation last year he pled no contest to two counts of assault stemming from a 1992 attack on two aspiring rappers in a Hollywood recording studio this is a man who has eight different convictions and Your Honor I ask you how many bites at the probation apples does this defendant get I think it is very clear that mr. a-night delivers a kick with his right
01:32:49
foot that man made a choice to ignore his conscience it is only him that can reconcile it and can change it we can't we could just move on give our contribution to the music industry and hope that nothing like this ever happens again if he was an active participant in this assault and I do find a violation of probation I also keep in mind I think the way he left the scene evidenced a consciousness of guilt I think he had been involved in an assault and the way he left the scene caused me to believe that he knew exactly what it was he was
01:33:21
doing what he had involved in your prior record indicates one of violence you are a danger to the community your prior performance on probation was not satisfactory you committed other crimes while you were on probation you're not a suitable candidate for probation in other words and so therefore probation is denied anybody here has any question that if we were dealing with somebody other than mr. Knight what we saw on that videotape first of all would not be sufficient to constitute a probation violation and secondly and most importantly even if
01:33:52
somebody thought it was it's certainly not the kind of violation of the kind of activity that warrants a nine year sentence how can she be in jail how can one of the most powerful people in a record business not black people one of the most powerful people in a record business being jailed for something as silly as stopping a fight or even kicking somebody in my opinion this is a miscarriage of justice you got this lawyer this attorney this
01:34:22
guy who is pretty brilliant so you know that this is an irregular attorney he's got some pool somewhere because he's got somebody from the DA's office involved in this thing and you're saying to yourself if all these people involved all these powerful people what kind of situation did he set should've been I mean Dave Kenner was a big man in our business on all levels and you have to ask yourself did the money get to him did the power you're to him you got to ask yourself a [ __ ] thinking about this
01:34:53
is he sitting in jail saying has this got really on my side Suge Knight was and is death row and for me without Suge Knight there is no death row if Suge has grasped all that has happened to him I think he could come out and again start up Death Row Records and start a record company that would be more viable than ever there will be legends no matter what happens but if they didn't continue to go on no telling what kind of influence they may have had on the inner-city youth in America when
01:35:23
you have guys that have the ears of not only black America but white America also you can call some shots anybody can sell a four million record five million records anybody can send our concerts around the world whatever they put their name and faces on will sell whatever they endorse will be backed up 100% the death row records story and told the tale of three major record labels almost brought one of them down rattled another to its core and set the framework for a whole new way of doing business in the music business this was
01:35:54
a story that wasn't just about a bunch of guys from Compton it was a story that affected the whole music business and ultimately the business world it's about empowerment it's about greed it's about ego it's about sex it's about violence it's about Fame it's about failure I mean you don't get any more American than that you the legacy there Death Row Records has left is both positive negative positive legacy is dead if you have talent and if you're prepared to work you can create a business and it can be successful
01:36:25
people always say remember how Suge started this company from nothing we can do that we're gonna hear this music forever it's gonna forever mark an era in American culture in American history and the sad part about this whole thing he's dead Jimmy Iovine and Ted feels soul in a scope for 400 million dollars I still have the article in The Wall Street John it says one us ups its stake in rap music so what they were buying
01:36:58
was death row they paid 400 million for it so Jimmy Iovine and Ted feel got 400 million Tupac's dead and she was in jail who's in jail Mike Harris Suge Knight and where's the money who controls the money what happens to the power that all
01:37:29
these black folks control death row is the named party in scores of lawsuits over its financial management and mismanagement with the federal investigation they're looking into shug's dealings in Las Vegas they're looking into his dealings with Michael Harris [Music] participated michael has an attempted murder charge over his head on a drug case over his head if the government offered Michael an opportunity to get out of jail to testify against David Kenner or Suge Knight or Andrew Young or
01:38:05
someone else there's a good chance that Michael could take it I would imagine in the minds of white corporate America record business had to be stopped he had to be stopped when we started taking the money that we make in the streets hard we do this hustling bottles selling bottle top selling a bag of weed on the
01:38:37
corner how do we do it we do it and we start realizing you know what let me find something legal to do that's when it becomes a problem they don't want us legal they'd rather we could they feel like you selling dope you'll never really get rich unless you the man sit next to the goddamn man it'll be hard to dig up and find who started what with what kind of legal money but they wouldn't want to do that if they were to take death row right now for Suge Knight what about Atlantic Group what about
01:39:10
Interscope Records they made more money than death row did offer death row if death row responded by drug money and death row made money and just go made money and Lana crew made money you take everybody right become your changes to black man [Music]
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