Sound engineer Geoff Emerick remembers recording The Beatles Sgt Pepper’s album | 7.30

Sound engineer Geoff Emerick remembers recording The Beatles Sgt Pepper’s album | 7.30

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we knew that why wouldn't they used to ask other bands into the control room that were working in the complex of the studios to come and listen to a finished track that we made and Richard - to look at the the band spaces who asked to come in and listen to the chat and at the end of the track they were just dumbfounded they could never ever believe what they just heard and that's the way it was I mean yes and that's that going back those 50 years I mean yeah that was the progression of music but that is there's
00:31
nothing like you so what was it in your mind about it it was just so different what it was the just looking for something looking for something different from last excellent from the way they were writing the way we approached the album technically because if it Gordon it was thrown to me after day we finished the revolver album and they license if they went on sewer and couldn't recreate any other songs on tour from the revolver out so John came
01:02
into the control room on that first day I said we're never been a to everybody and we're going to make an album that sounds on it and things on it but no one's ever heard before and everyone looks at me and I know what I've got I've got nothing you know except on revolver ideas to get some of the things on ribs old rights would have used the equipment and got into trouble sometimes from the management has to be careful well hair type was EMI in terms of standards and what she couldn't couldn't whatever the thing was it was a classic classical bass at that time it
01:35
was a you know they've recorded a lot of you know Maria Callas and that is the starts coughing the most wonderful people and conductors it was it was classical and we've got people like the life of drinks you know the artists and they accept their records playing for the classical sessions so that was so as an upper-crust sort of attitude from the classical people and a lot of older people young we were liking the first young generation that entered into Abbey Road or EMI as it was then say let me take that as a cue so when you first met
02:06
the Beatles right what did you think of well I would well I I was learning the ropes when I first started and if those later they came in to report their first single which ended up being lovely dude I said have wasn't how do you give it they became you to do a Mitch Murray song and they didn't like doing it that's where John said all we want to do one of our island but I said to the guy that was teaching me Richard I'm not not really love another issue come on I'll ask the management can I sit or stand in
02:37
on that session to see I know what's because they were just a band from Liverpool that people say oh they came they bid for their artist test with repeat best and stuff and some reason there they were bound I don't know there was an attitude they would be cleared and moptops and is very different from Cliff Richard and the shadows let's put it that way so the second day I start I started started they came in to record that record I think Anakin Otis being in a control room and watching that what's the right see what my job's gonna be yeah which is operating the tape machines in it we didn't start in the
03:08
library then you know we went straight in as the second engineer so the only time looking down and universities like up they they're a tile as the thin no Heisman and the jackets and stuff them and maybe different you know it was like anti-establishment I get a little because we were like the first generation after the second world war there aren't any money in our pockets I guess and and the course that we were not revolting but we were on key establishment in their own system in Carnaby Street came into being and it
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was a an era of sort of freedom I guess so this it was humor tube or something oh yeah but yeah I mean they know exactly they were they were funny because because I guess it was the Liverpool humor but they reacted to me traveling nothing in a funny manner with another human report dial and kills Marty's like the schoolmaster you know with his tie and a jacket and very stern could be other no start was I mean you know I went before you used to start recording you to the big lot of buzzer
04:11
was for the classic you put that red light on subpoena the papers going and they all got nervous and you know but it was you know you know I think I know that the business of sales of referred to you guys at the schoolmaster so let's go to that point in time late in 66 yet where sergeant pepper's tax to get recorded did you have any hint about how extraordinary this record was going to be at that point on that first day yeah the first thing we did started story filled I mean
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that was the head and this should still be filled and pretty lame were going to go on on on so on with the intention we come it was didn't have a title at that time it's going to be a collection of songs and facts you know to make this album so it eventually became silent pepper it didn't start off the Sergeant Pepper so suddenly films was the first track we started to record and it was lost as a single because he and I were desperate for a single so there you are sitting there and that and John and the others turned to you essentially and
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they're saying you've got to get the sounds we want how did you feel or there wasn't but they didn't they didn't know what they wanted except they wanted different sounds so under little manner of tell me that week and we've never once we've done something we always strive to get if we recorded something in a certain way just as an example if the planner would be miked on the top for the next song because I used to listen to it as I go rehearsing the song and sort of people because why I work without thanking the picturing in tonality and stuff and the certain sound
05:43
I might pick up on my they they were feeling it so for instance is the next time I'm going to make the piano differently so I might mic it from underneath which no one would do you know so all the time I'm looking for different you know ways of doing things there was an air duct under the floor which used to sort of resume and I think I take two kids little thin condense a light on the floor over the air duct which you could hear John sometimes and and a not excite close miking that little condenser mics really really close on some things as you know there's
06:14
like little heart called noises and George active instrument called the Virgin or I think it was it was like a practiced piano it was about that long instead one little thin string on it you could play it and you know I used to put the might liked it's there you know and it sounded amazing I'm quite sure Lucia the sky does a lot of that I can't remember that but all the time I was just looking and looking and looking you know for new ways of doing things the saving grace for me was something I've worked with on the revolver album which was the Fairchild 660 limiter where that jump
06:44
sound came from with a whole drum kit went through that limiter and it really kept pounding punchy sound so details went through that vocals definitely went through the Fairchild 660 so that was my big that make things sound really great and then sort of a big healthy camula said so that that process when that they would run through a song yeah and there you are sitting in the control room and even as they're running through the song yes you had to start coming up with ideas I'm thinking yeah absolutely
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tell us how that worked what I mean what one another example then was on lovely Rita Rita Wainwright they would stop for the solo and in fact I suggested the piano solo believe it or not because they were really notice what about what solo they put on it so they pull shouted ourselves at the top of the stairs and Paul said oh you play right so I'm so nervous you know in those days so I didn't I can't do it so thinking about it although it sounded weird at the time to
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do the piano solo it would when you think about it was not going to sound right so what I did I love you the shimmer behind the piano because you get a sound of a piano that no one occurs again because it would these especially all new sounds so what I did I put using their contract the echo chamber on it which is at the back a number two and we could sing the signal at the piano bar a tape machine into the echo chamber which would give some sort of delay so what I did I stuck sticky tape on all the guide rollers of the tape machine so when the
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tape went for it it's normally in all over the place right again if the manager would come here I will probably would have got fired I got into terrible trouble so model to take go through through the the heads right of the tape machine and what the echoes or the piano into the sound into the chamber and that was like the sound behind the piano but then you can actually get that sale as a plug-in because most plugins now based on the things we used to do so that's one example you know see Richard lush in yourself yeah you're very young yeah and you're carrying all this way
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the other one absolute but it was still carrying the waves a responsibility because Richard was the master of the you know automatic double tracking it really was I mean so tell us about it how did that work why it was a little bit complicated but it started started office all that John was getting lazy and he wanted although both him and Paul they credible a double tracking their voices they could do it with just at one castle against the first pass to get this bat texture and it was spot-on with the first pass you know and then John
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was getting lazy from I remember it all fit up well why have I got to figure the game you've got a machine that can do it he just said things he couldn't understand anything with if you know what we were doing so then it was it was k-town the end of the EMI came up with the idea of what we would do we can only do it when we were mixing of doing a four track to four track so there was a thing on the multitrack machine or the floor time machine called a seat pick which gave me the signal before the
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replay head so that signal from the sink head went into a tape machine which was on various speed that rich of control so you can so the surf is a copy of the vocal but it was big copied before you heard it on the replay normal replay so you can either advance or it so if you're going to spot on it was probably phrase itself and the power supply was quite big into this tape machine that did copy of the voice in it needed a bit in those days of big powered unit to power the motor and
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we've unleashed like a sweet boss oscillator which is quite large it was a little earlier one like got now so anyway he used the set set set it and sometimes the book bring bring the image second image you know away from exactly the the original image and so we got the double set both sometimes you just moved it slightly written as the voice is going through and then what flange II was with on Richard sort of just work why are like that with it especially guitars to bend the copy guitar no you know no one
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really knew what Richard was doing and sometimes because Richard I used to love that you know and and suddenly you know we've been doing it so any something we did within you without you most of Indian instruments automatic double tracks but rich is you know seditious go berserk we said love it and John and look around and smiled petit lapin and what was ever John George market active come like that too much you know still officious you know the rigid was the ice of that is going so it appears
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that John Lennon didn't really like him for so he said you want to disguise it tells a I said like his voice and so we are you always wanted that that's what we call times echo which affects those and here's the like listening to the console in to be sports like the SES or the t's know in the headphones and I think sometime because what you know before he starts singing a song you hear in go view notes to get the sort of rhythm it was normally the set speed we didn't mess around on very sweet 15 on
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therapy you know and he just loved it and it helped him a lot personal down the life and I think we actually recorded that Twitter echo at the time of doing his vocal because in those days as well you know via four tracks you didn't say I would do another one will do another one will do another one we do a pass on the phone call we've only got maybe two tracks to concentrate the vocals I think you know can I get most get to the two takes at the protocol so you want to put a third one you get a white one of them it's gone you know so most of John's vocals with
12:24
done quite quickly I think not many passes so you found a way if you like of making his voice acceptable to ring did you twice absolutely I mean I again it goes back to the revolver days because of using that Fairchild limiter because normal it was a being regular way of recording a which advice first sighted would know you know I'm not knocking Cliff Richard but that's the way it was recorded the Mike was there and then very little just a little bit of
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limiting on whatever but I found out that if you sort of got you know really sort of close and put a lot of limiting on it really got the voice way out you know and lifted the volume of the mouth noises and so on and because he loved it you know and when he started because whether to limit to stop limiting and he'd stop seeing my mouth noises they have you amplified to a large level so they face a level that you know so tell us about George Martin's role in all this you alluded to the fact that he would sometimes turn to you it's been
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written down I think Richard said that when you put too much flange on yes the good Martin would react in a certain way what would he do but I mean sup I mean it off the helmet his catchphrase was erroneously I've done with the Richard setback but George would say honestly just Richard something like that and so no he was still at that time very officious whereas we sort of respected the officiousness but you know he told you Jordans developed back he wasn't born up like that he developed that you know
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that wasn't his real true character you know buddy just I want to see I guess see what sounds a lot the same when Richard used to go overboard and we both and even Leonard and laugh what people we were doing on this guitar with it you know bullying like this and Richard go berserk here and then George would hear it and I said very officious and not really like it I get excited about and during those sergeant Pepper's sessions what was the nacelle of the interplay between you and George Mark it wasn't a lot of interplay George obviously the it
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was taking a long time to you know record the basic rhythm track once the instrumentation have been sorted out as to what instruments are going to play so after that there wasn't a lot except for George to sit there and and listen to that the various takes and if there was a problem speak to them and so forth and help pick them collect train coming you know it's all done we're all in it together you know sometime recessions obviously would go
15:02
late at night I need more yes what how did you guys all stay awake though we eventually through the stage I guess it must have been either a third of the way and we were starting at like 4:00 in the afternoon I work until two maybe five or six in the morning possibly and we used to go and sleep and get in control in the afternoon and we did you need 70 to keep away no not at all look what it's like I did find out I was pretty good at that but I did find out from Gerry
15:33
Beckley who was the the singer from America and he knew about Evans and mal Evans are told him but he used to drop things in my tea and was Martine Setia probably Richard C and we were completely unaware of that to keep you aware to keep us awake yeah yeah because we would we knew what maybe what was going on with the Jack situation with them because they erected a little area with screams and stuffy number two so they couldn't be seen from the control room you know so tell us about that because pepper more than most albums in
16:03
musical history has a an association that we mind-altering drugs yeah were the Beatles smoking even adult what yet they were but the other things that they would take you week were complete we knew they were are probably worth taking other things but we were sort of in SS unaware of it I mean Richard I probably had more insight than George possibly it may have been a really ignorant but yes in the realism there was one occasion is he very funny actually and they would
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they try anything I don't know which track it was one that they came in about seven o'clock eight o'clock one night to do some vocal overdubs on they've been somewhere I remember and then the idea was to get a strobe light going in the studio because they're moving around in number two studio with the stroke going and it looks like one of those old Charlie Chaplin feelings because within ten minutes they've all got migraines I know what's go home if they try anything
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that's been tested yeah so when you say that George wasn't to George Martin wasn't too sure what was going on I know he might you might not respect in terms of then smoking dope no he knew they were smoking because I'm a dad start lighting just sticks and stuff like that we knew that was going on but the outside outside and we were pretty well behaved in the studio I mean they worked really really hard and especially Ringo I mean he even died get on today I mean if I'm here now they really worked hard
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and obviously they they smoked a couple of joints maybe but I mean and that was the end of it really and they kept themselves really together the only when they are the most fun was when they were doing the vocals and the vocal might because as soon as they got around the vocal wire then they started giggling and laughing and sort of savage form falling apart you know they get halfway through a vocal and then pour my start laughing if they were doing a harmony vocals on John might start laughing because you don't know on the mic that we used in most instances if it was like
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harmony vocals it was a Michael that's on what we call figure of eight so it's live both sides so they're looking at each other and that's how comes you know the development of the giggles started because they're looking at each other so let's try to keep a straight face you know so let's talk about each of them you talked about going go and the hard work nobody answered why don't you spend makers a lot of sometimes he gets overlooked because you know we had like these little drum booth and you know as I said earlier you know we keep changing
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the rhythmic rhythm of the songs we might they might try for hours one way and not be happy with the rhythm or so forth from there they try another way any is that he'd be drumming from this time that we started to routine a song known for a long time ours might be and and the session was always over normally when you see Ringo stand up at 4:00 in the morning be yeah I know yeah at 4:00 in the morning I put his come on and that you know that it didn't say anything you
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know the others were talking and we just finished another take or something you'd be so tired he to stand up and put his coat on you know that was the end of the session now if you had a favorite out of all the Beatles who did you find yourself drawn to or Paul obviously I mean Paul was the musician's musician and I think Paul owned an understanding of what I was doing as well so you knew I was into the instruments and social you know listening to musical instruments and crafting Norman let's put it that way and did he drive pepper to your line the concept well he was the
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one that always wanted 110 percent and what which is like the acceptance of a take but I think the concepts of pepper must have started about maybe halfway through the album and then it's and you know I'm not working on it I wasn't aware of this you know people keep you know you see articles about it but John thought of it as Paul's album you know didn't like it but you man with the Richard said that's what's happening and you know it so what have also what
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happened the fact the idea was you'll suppose that one on one session as some selects relation from Paul possibly about the album and the idea was that you were sitting in the audience listening to your Parton is in itself you're seeing in the theater as a part of an audience and the songs and that all the songs come on and they're all on stage so after that I just I'm going to on the intro on the Sergeant Pepper track aside basaltic pepper so alone it
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goes into Billy shears and as I know you can hear on whichever burst area all the mono you here in the audience laugh and then because we were flying the sound effects in you know the audience and bits and there's a little master in there and Paul Mazur must have made it out well that's when you know Ringo comes on stage to sing Billy shears and he trips up and falls over that's why the audience laugh so every song is like a different so it comes onstage that was the perception but that's never really been put in print anywhere I don't think so
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that was one one what so that was one one one one yeah so it took the other side of the equation John why would you describe him to work with ah well I mean he could John could be you I was just it was just the brash guy it was very strange because um it was could be rude and silly cool and it wasn't terribly nice to me sometimes I mean every one of the reasons either left in the White House it was so the things that he'd been
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saying and stuff so um he was just adamant it was like he was just brush I guess and he couldn't he couldn't explain himself properly you know he had ideas but he didn't know how to project the idea or tell you the idea that he was hearing so he described in some ways like the Dalai Lama you know singing I wasn't my boss and so I could Dalai Lama on a mountaintop which happened on on the revolver album so that's the way he used to tell you what he was he wanted you know right and and tell me this
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though that in the end of paper sessions the assumed still seems to be that marvelous combination of the two working together lennon-mccartney which was that right oh absolutely I mean like my theory is I mean because they were both opposites I mean Paul was the romantic for want of a better word and and John was the aggressive guy and you know the rough-and-tumble type guy so the combination of those you know those two things made the arrangements of thing
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and made those songs and the tracks the way they are the ultimate expression of that probably is downing the life yeah yeah there were two songs yeah when John first played you yeah Dana life yeah what was your reaction Oh unbelievable because I was down in the studio and he strummed it through to George Martin you know it's because she came in with the song and we still we started from scratch and I went up into the controllers it's a widget you actually hear this you know it was because of the feeling that John could put into a vocal and I could my theory
23:24
again on this was fact that being the guy that the bashful guy he was and rough-and-ready when he came to do us a vocal tract there was a he got this emotion into his vocal cords so it was like two different people so I thought well and I could never figure it out and it was only a long time after you know we fission what we are many many years after I guess it what it was he used to think of his childhood and then by doing that it gave me the emotion to spial to see those songs because if they were two different
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people at almost every point of the day in the life there's a there's a kind of technical innovation but that that you needed to develop to give him the sound they wanted how did that go I mean well for me the first time I heard it you know John was playing that the song to George Martin in the studio and I went upstairs to tell Richard you know you want you to hear this it's unbelievable and feeling the emotion from the way he was sitting in the song and at that time we had John had with
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the verses and yet he had in his own mind this in a sense the finished thing because he knew that were going to be gaps of 24 bars within the song and there was another little gap so anyway we did the bass basic thing I was going to also get the best drum sounds ever recorded because we go back 50 years now why and remind me about the jumps element so we got the gaps so I don't know when the when pulls song wedding
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but but it was a question well what can we put in that gap I'm pulsing oh I've got a song which I'm really finished which was woke up got out of bits I will put that in there so none of this was like outside of the studio constructed it all came piecemeal you know built up in the studio so anyway I woke up got over don't must've done if lead vocal because that vocal track of Paul's went on to the same vocal track as John because on when Paulson sees the word dream probably Richard Matt mentioned here Paul sees
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the word dream at the end of his song John's ah voices at that point so Paul acted we've told of we told Paul to keep the dream as a short word because otherwise we would have Wyatt John's vocal beginning so in the know all hell would have gotten more tracks right so then any other big audacity or Kestrel things all cacophony so then that's standing now and so what about a 90 piece Orchestra so then George Martin
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nineties got a budget which is you get this to think about EMIs budget so now we come on afford a 90 piece Orchestra without that so Ringo then said well let's have a 45 piece Orchestra and put it on twice all right so everyone salads needed and smiled so we get out of this cacophony so what we decided to do with the 45 piece Orchestra we for the first time was to link to four track machines together in some really primitive fashion so the first orchestral take was
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put onto track four of the first four track which made it completely in sync with the rhythm and the buckler's that was everything also properly the orchestra was finished on that type because all that finished sounds what always recorded on since like we didn't do a lot of words on the mix and always finish those they were recorded so we we then I would put on a second sheet with another four tracks and we didn't know what sold the orchestra because it was if you'd have told the orchestra you were doing that you would have to paint the next of money but eventually they
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found out and they were actually paid so we did another take and recorded this next orchestral part pass on track one of the second four track then another pass on the second nonprofit on a phone number and forth and the both motors in the tape machines repulsed by the same fifty cycle pulse so they've sort of promoters we don't essentially yes put like a grease pencil mark on the tapes II started them together running record one on play and then at the end of that Chris you know John wanted the orchestra to have funny noses and glasses and God
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knows what else tuxedos and the orchestra really fed up you know they hated this session and the score was just twenty four bars one note here you start with and one note at the end on the last bar and the instruction was we start on this note and in your own time you reach that note you know over twenty four bars I said we can't do that we're going to have it written so you know Jules Martin spent like 20 minutes explaining to them they're still
28:06
saying that we can't do it we want it written but the idea was innings don't listen to the man that man sitting next to you you just go from that no to that no in your own time so you get all this noise and cacophony and it was David Mason who played the the bark champion on Penny Lane who was in the orchestra and Island civil who played the French horn on phenom on who would like like the main grow great brass players in the classical orchestras then and they said no come on lads come on come on we can
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do this because they have a little relation there those two members you know we because they played on Beatle records before because what happened what we're now doing is seeing the breakdown between the classical and pop people this is the beginning of that happening but although it was really under tension that night so I don't imagine if they do do that maybe they play the part and because it sounds amazing and then pull out the idea which is now the piano chord at the end as there are so many guests around with some of the Rolling Stones and some of the Monkees and you know there's a lot
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of people around so it's like a party going on in the studio and we would learn the orchestra so Paul said let's try and someone going on like that on the end so we played it the track back to the studio and were people that were around did this on them but it didn't work so that you know two weeks later we probably put the four pianos on until party was doing the heart of the harmonium there's a slight butter under that chord which is sort of disappeared of it when I try to clean it out so you know and there's a little squeak you
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know because that's that chemical here I started to lift the volume of the the microphones it's always feedback to the control room and that the very immense like the longest real piano chord ever heard as it died away then the very end ring ring go movies foot and here this little screen as you can hear in some versions and pull Brad ringer you know so the drum sound on that also what we regard to the best drum sound ever recorded so what I did for the first
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song is to take the bottom skins off the tom-toms and I put microphones in glass jugs laps in a detail underneath batons the theory being that you've hit you know the attack comes from at the top you know skin and the tonality comes from the bottle so that's why I did I tried a few other things maybe a hundred for the first time it when I can do the snare or not quite sure but ever I didn't might be in a different way because it was going to be the best drum sound ever which it was then classed as being the best drum sound ever so that's how all this stuff that we try as hard
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as we could to make the next song even better than the song before so when you play a day in the life back alright yeah but what was the reaction now so rich is nice enough enough money to mix that night after the session and the control removes number one studio and Abbey Road all your lives it was their own attitude saying that so I feel you know everyone's it's quite sort of crammed in there a lot of the guests that are being asked and we start with Richard I sort
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of set it up we played it back and it was like going from square black and white film into the CinemaScope technique Apple don't miss this monitor and there was absolute silence at the end of it again no one had ever ever ever heard anything like that in Airlines and Rob riches is sitting down here to the side of the mixing console and one was the produce of the Hollies a Northern Road items heavily chains and usually I'm going to give a business up each others no one could ever get anywhere near this you know and he was really down but so that he wanted is I
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know easy to say what it was like but you have to experience being there or not we played that rough monitor mix back it was just incredible now the context of all this is that Paul McCartney certainly and Brian Wilson letting the billboards were in competition with each other yes when you played back a down the life yeah with their sins from Paul or John that they'd lived up to that challenge of Pet Sounds I've got no idea the place sounds issue it's all very vain to me because I know there's a list
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of all pet no Paul no the river disc player record player the studio and his plan sounds not at mark which I really wasn't aware of I'm green I'm really wasn't aware of any of this and and it was never really mentioned in front of us about this Pet Sounds thing you know um sort of growing out and will report in I don't know I mean Paul more but she talks about it but in his net I was never aware of this comparison between us and Pet Sounds at that time to be obviously do well good matter in the end because the reaction mm pebble is so
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fantastic fifty years on you think it stood the test of time locals I mean some unbelievable you know I know that I won't even go there cuz I'm disgusted about this reissue but I mean because you were so diverse this stereo you know the extreme left and rights and so forth you know Brian Wilson here's and fix that's deliberate which it wasn't it's the only way we could mix it it wasn't recorded in stereo as we call it in mono and this is the way the only thing that could be making so diaper that's left and right and center and but
33:14
Brian thought that was deliberate obviously but a physicist at the same time the test of time when you listen back to the album now what's your reaction um well I know a great I mean I you know I mean up like I find them on our CDs that's about the only thing I can complain now I mean that's not too bad I mean those reissued stereo ones which has been cleaned it up so mostly a lot of that text to see it was an artistic thing to us as far as I was
33:44
concerned it's like painting a picture with with paints and a certain tone and ecology those and textures in those paints so when it first is what happened when I was doing something for narrows or something if we double caliber lon you know their attitude was well we don't want it to sound like a cow and if we thought I could get on time to make it not sound like it guitar right all the time this is going on so we opened up the cowbell once that obviously a terrible sounds dreadful so there's less tons and tons and tons of playing that the lots of bottom in it
34:16
you know and it didn't really sound like a cowgirl anymore which was the idea so um someone came up to us at one of these talks on they after these reissues other one those reissues came out and asked yeah I like it she said she said there's a sound on that record I never knew what it was right because they cleaned it out and she sighs Claire's got a nice a cowbell now and one thing cause you weren't supposed to night of the cowbell you know so all these ratio things it's all based on technical technical technical things
34:46
the artistic thing has been completely ignored as to how it was was made you know and for how it was made so let's set that aside when you go back to the work that you produced both the mono and stereo yeah and you look back at them now what what are the words you had to describe it as an achievement I was proud of it I guess because of what it is as I said when we finished it we knew
35:16
that it was perfect and it was special but in what way we didn't know that it was going to be as get bigger and bigger and bigger every week even the over 15 50 years time you know it's still I can just proud of it to be honest with you that's all I can say that's all you need to say yes that's wonderful and I want us to ask one more question because and one of the things we've been doing in Australia for the ovc and I've
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been involved in this is just a reflection on some of our great pop artists of the cities and and I you had talked about Paul McCartney but I I just wanted to ask you how would you describe Paul McCartney in his contribution to modern music oh I mean I know you shouldn't really use the word genius because I know we once but he was in the controller with George Martin Arthur living in a total war album and we
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started to talk about University he was on whatever track it was we danced tug of war and the way was structured and so forth and we like to remark them you know you're a genius but what if you're not I'm not the genius it didn't it didn't want to accept that because no genius is a funny word you know how about I understand as a genius possibly but to start relating into musics a bit different I really am so he's like like like all the old incredible songwriters yeah I think
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early in them all those people on e and you can't touch him I mean some some of those songs that Israel and I said they're just unbelievable and what what was he like to work with exciting yes I mean it could be exciting as there's one document document it's called one hand clapping this little button or whatever seen that and it was done in number two Abbey Road it was when he was with wings and it was just after we've done Band on
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the Run and this little things called one hand clapping and we just recorded it live some tax off a band on the run and it was giving and the guy called Jeff who was the drummer then and Denny and Linda and the energy in these songs are just amazing to think that you know he is just and um it's one of those things and not many people know about it documentary but when it behaved his performances it's just incredible it's
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just what was it about him that that man great can work with was it that it was he demanded no he wasn't he knew what he wanted you know I mean and I guess we got on well together because you know he yeah he liked he knew or how I functioned you know how I could interpret his songs you know and we call them basically and I think it's been suggested that John was arrival with him
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did you sense that rivalry between them not really I mean Martin was more aware of that from a political point of view then Philip than I was because I George was thinking of the politics involved who's got this song who's got that song you know and so forth on on the album you know yeah but what an incredible combination well yeah I mean ever I mean it yeah well never it might happen again in 200 years let's think think about it in that way I mean - art was probably the pop guy of his
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day and he wasn't classical in his day he was pop pop music and then you know the Beatles came along as what they are I think it's going to be many many many years before anything if ever would materialize like my life or people say Paul McCartney has a fennec thinking very much master pleasure that's going okay

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