Scratch 2001 - Documentary

Scratch 2001 - Documentary

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Language: English

Type: Robot

Number of phrases: 1609

Number of words: 11025

Number of symbols: 46805

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00:03
you [Music] you must be told [Music] this one particular day when I came home from school I you know I usually go home in practice and I was playing music a little bit too loud and my mom's came in banged on the door if you don't cut that music down you're gonna have to cut it off so while she was in the doorway you know screaming at me I was still home in a record and
00:55
rubbing the record back and forth when she left I was like hmm that was laughs that's a that's a pretty good idea so when she left I experimented with it you know a couple of months a couple of weeks different records and then when I was ready we gave a party and that's
01:14
when I first had to do some scratch am just cat named our Pecola who brought two copies of five minutes of funk about Houdini and France and he just started cutting up the beginning of the the five minutes of funk and he had a little felt pads and everything I'd already seen hip-hop being done like on you know they'd been footage like that show graffiti rock but I see somebody in
01:58
Texas actually do it in my face at school was I like oh man it was actually doing when I'm seeing on TV and stuff and he's actually making a come to lay in that text and I stepped on without yo man you gotta show her how to do that [Music] the scratching thing that's always the first thing we usually grab somebody how the hell are they doing that you know so it's like that was me how they were doing that so I grabbed my mom's whatever record Joan Baez record and I'm scratching on the turntable tearing this [ __ ] up out of it you know and then
02:31
she's not home so thank God you know but she comes home there's grooves on beat this [ __ ] and there's records all busted my dad used to hide his needles in these attache cases that my mom had and he would hide the needles there lock them up and my brother would pick the lock and take the leaders out and stuff like that and set them up on the turntables and called his friends over and his friends will just bring massive records like crates of Records and stuff like that and they just make tapes you know they make them all kind of mix tapes
03:07
with his friends Ryman and my brother DJ and cutting up beats and stuff like that and downs my first exposure to the whole art of DJing in hip hop a lot of people get rap and hip hop mixed up it's two totally different things when you say rap you say a MC and the DJ when you say hip-hop if you say graffiti
03:39
you say breakdancer you say DJ's you say MCS the way you dress the way you talk all the elements into one that's hip-hop [Music] [Music] this is the famous Browns river houses the home of hip-hop we also used to say the home of God and also a little Vietnam it was crazy at one time with even police when they come in we had a lot of gang violence happening at the
04:21
time also a lot of social witness that was also happening at the time so that's why we started Universal nation trying to take a lot of gang affiliations and turn into something positive Bambaataa was one of the heads of the Black Spades you know same is the division leader and it was taken from a concept but Bambaataa went to africa when he was leaving the space and he seen all the black people were living over there and you know he adapted his clothes you say when I go back and start the Zulu Nation we started organizing a lot of the different people in the street you know different dance groups
04:53
b-boys b-girls as well as on Rattlers and graffiti artists all together to make the whole culture it involved from us beat each other up to like breakdance nice to breakdance myself back before Crazy Legs before all of kasi I got the moves for me you know it [Music] [Applause] [Music] I guess was 73 and a lot of these DJ's they were basically uh playing you know
05:24
kind of like a disco club type of thing you know lot of stuff is being played on the radio a lot of popular stuff and out of all of that came this rebel Kool Herc he wouldn't play that main album cut he would play a break from a song inside the album so it was like beats and rhythms and you know I'm saying his style was he was like God the great beard is that part that you look for in the record then let your guard so just get Wow then as soon as that break we
05:55
please you say like ah there's only a minute it's only 30 seconds you know you want to hear some more so that's where the hip-hop DJ's came in and stopped making that feel that break beats that stripped-down Punk and span longer and longer for you could just get crazy and crazy and crazy on a dance mode so that inspired me right there I was like okay I got this song 15 piece drum set upstairs that I took four since I was eight years old building up you know I'm saying now I got to make room for some
06:26
turntables one day I'm upstairs Bam's turntables dropped it broke so Aziz who was one of the original members of the Zulu nation he's like yo man bam need your turntables before he can get the words out his mop I ran into Roy pack the turntables up its I was at the door like this we're better what his turntables down a little get on and started rocking the house and came on our little Protege to the bend
06:56
[Applause] yeah jazzy J metal oak that was did all DST all of them had they different cat services that just blew up the turntable the DJ was the source of the energy because it was his responsibility to find the music the selection of music but what type of rhythms that the people would feel in the audience and they actually were no emcees it was just the DJ we would never give him the mic and start saying around the only time we would pick up the microphone is when we
07:35
would say if he owned the green truck outside please move it or-or-or Jerry your mother's at the door and it was a DJ who had to give the rites of passage to the MC to even pick up a mic and he said I was walking down the street just the hundreds of the beat and everybody else wasn't doing the Freak didn't they ask me about another MC I said a wimp in a wham I don't give a damn look like a jelly but they call it a jam you know
08:06
the MCS were just more or less there to get and get the people involved like we would create the crowd participation you know all the holes say ho you know anything that had to do with the crowd was way to emcee the master of ceremonies got involved the DJ was the backbone and we were their arms the legs and everything else to make him colorful if a person wants to get an understanding of how hip-hop was back then the best thing is to look at my house now because you know that was how
08:50
it was done you're not gonna get the C Grandmaster Flash you know cutting in his kitchen that wasn't like part of you know somebody wrote a skit or something but this was what we gonna do be gonna have him put his turntables in the kitchen no they were in the kitchen a lot of the club's further down in midtown Manhattan they never wanted to book no don't MC the DJs as time went by and they found out that we were making money that's when he started booking us things started being pushed getting pushed more downtown that's when a lot
09:26
of the punk rockers started coming up hanging with us and partying among black and Latinas where everybody thought it was gonna be some type of racial ballads and this and that but as uncle George Clinton say one nation under food we interrupt this record to bring you a special bulletin the reports of a flying saucer hovering over the city have been confirmed to maybe was when the grill opened up on 3rd Avenue down around 10th
09:58
Street and I saw it tiny little ad in The Village Voice that said the cold crush brothers we're gonna be at Negril and I went down there with my girlfriend at the time and we walked in and it was a basement club and I could hear this enormous loud feed happening yeah so I gave him the money and I went down the stairs so fast I think she was flying behind me like a flag in a cartoon you're like whoo and and I said yeah man I was you know standing there at the edge of the dance floor and they're like a couple of Japanese
10:31
business guys who seemed to be everywhere in hip-hop at the beginning you know they're standing around there they like always know where it's at you know and me and my girlfriend - listen this is great how she said well I think I'm gonna have to have like a drink I went over what two of us are here here you go just happen both and because I was like I didn't even I didn't need I didn't need the drink or anything I was just like you know let's go let's go let's go let's go because there's nothing in this music that I don't want to hear there's words that are kind of syncopated and rhythmic and there's this
11:01
hot drum track it's great this is music I've been waiting all my life to hear and I didn't know it we felt so attached this because this was this wasn't just something that we did for the money I mean we believed in this I mean when I left I could play for six seven hours outside and when I came home I set my turntables up and I play for another six seven hours you know I'm saying it was something I had to do its history and a lot of people don't really understand
11:34
what actually happened then because there's the pre-wrap record hip hop before people were arriving on records where rapper's delight' came out it got into the era where the rappers didn't mean a DJ as long as they have a drum machine on the side you didn't need a DJ and a lot of record companies wanted to just pay the rappers and not pay the DJ's because the rapper's voice is on the record so what do you need a DJ what is the ones that put the emcees out
12:04
there but then the emcees became the power a lot of MCS got away from the the cultural part and got into all about the Benjamins and they left the DJ behind it took a lot out of hip-hop in my heart you know because I was one of the rappers who liked to rap to my DJ's feeling you know if he felt good I felt good in my music was sounding good because he was sounded good and vice-versa but then when it was a dad is like you're rhyming on a
12:33
flatline not a heartbeat Buffalo gals Malcolm McLaren all the scratchings making minutes ago zigga zagga where's that sound coming from the zigga zagga what is that sound so one day I turned on the TV I seen a mix with GST live in concert with Herbie Hancock oh that's
13:13
where that zigga zagga sound comes from there's that turntable moving back and forth and then I knew that's what I'm gonna be one day it was just so futuristic at its time who would have thought I mean there's people playing the trumpet drums but I just knew that this is something different hey I want to move the record back and forth in my own way actually I couldn't afford turntables at the time so I bought two tape decks and I used to record Halloween spooky sounds or space sounds from 1999 and I would mix up two
13:51
tape decks and that's where I got my name makes master Mike Mike really communicates with the salt of the solar system and he really he and and a few other not just know about the aliens they have the knowledge of having been there you know in other words he knows about earth because he's here and he's moving around and those strategies just trying to show the earth people what's going on but that he's he's he's truly a
14:24
sectarian I got inspired one day because down from the apartment complex was a football field then I seen these three lights that landed on the field out of my window I kid you not and that's where I got inspiration to like hmm maybe it was my scratching that caused these light beams to come in land maybe they're visiting and maybe I am actually communicating to intergalactic beings
15:06
I grew up listening to Lara jazz and funding I wanted to be a part of that movement and in another way instead of just being a listener [Music] [Applause] [Music] [Laughter]
15:57
[Music] that's Robert Johnson the Delta blues why got here life-size Qbert as you can tell my super physique it matches this man right here I used to DJ garage parties and stuff and maybe sometimes where I do the same garage and other months and I'd see this kid pop up every
16:49
now and then and it would happen to be Qbert we wouldn't like approach me like yo I dig what you do mics I said well I'll show you some stuff when I come to my apartment he'd sit there and just watch me practice the whole day then in between my practices you'd ask me how do you do this can you do that again my advice do not show this guy your scratch that you found and developed because he will take that and understand it so much more than you have plays like the Louis Armstrong and scratching you
17:20
know even everyone tries to us I can't accept me though look a lot better one day everyone's gonna talk about yoga for but for now we got this guy we wanted only DJ Qbert [Music] this is a fader oh so you can just what is on and off it's kind of like talking you know you just just speak what you're saying you know the more the more techniques you know the more it's like each technique is a word and so the larger you of a vocabulary the more articulate you can
18:03
speak are verbs be juggling is the live manipulation and remix of music right before your eyes usually what you do is cut you kind of use the same two records so this is like I'm just using a piece of the records called a break it's like this is the same record as well right the fader is like for that turntable not turntable right and in the middle is
18:34
both so if you mess with both of those beat something I've always been into music ever since I was a kid my mom even said when she would play music and I'd be in her stomach I would kick and stuff and I can't sleep unless there's music on I was like a d-minus student I totally hated school and I always would
19:07
go home and just do music I had a little turntable when I was little kid it was it was one of those fisher-price turntables and I used to play it back with the stuff and I was like four or five years old now I would always say to myself wow I wish I could record my voice and put on record as soon as sound like a playing plays mellow flavor my flavor I played with my voice [Music] strategy really came to me when when I
19:39
heard I guess rocket DST was the first one to use that sound you can get your DJ skills by when they use that sound it's kind of like if you can gauge a guitar as a skill if they you just use a plain acoustic guitar and see what they could do with it you know so this is like the plane sound or here or this one scratching is like um to me it's like some other kind of intelligence I mean Qbert used to practice that's where we
20:11
made up the question and answer I scratched the question and he would give me an answer and so we didn't even have to talk to each other for a whole day I remember one time he moved away to another city and I was like damn how am I gonna how am I gonna bite it how am I gonna you know I'm gonna get his ideas so I imagine all these like my DJ's from out of space like what would their selfie he took that and just like one in his own world with it since Earth is like it's like kind of like a primitive
20:42
planet what about the more advanced civilizations how does their music sound so I would imagine it you know whatever they're doing and I guess that's how I come up with my ideas [Music] [Music] what's up with all the bulletproof scratch hamsters changed our name for the space travelers why is that you changed our anchors a DJ Mars and we
21:35
don't give a [ __ ] actually yeah I mean everyone in high school everyone had their cruise and you'd bring your whole system and everyone would play for half an hour and whoever like rocked the crowd the best was you know like the winners no Ryder car show YMCA corner store battles you know what I mean school DJ battles a lot parties and [ __ ] you know I used to do funny and the [ __ ] would want to take my turns you know but that never happened did it it's all about badly you know you got the b-boy battles and and totally the DJ battles and stuff and everyone
22:24
would would kind of get together or or you would even go to someone's house even if they just did a party in someone's garage where they'd open up the door and every like eight people sitting around is all the time if you keep down a little bean that got all
22:51
sweaty just scratch scratch scratch if you're doing something and no one even gives that [ __ ] about what you're doing and you're just doing it your bedroom for yourself like how you really feel it's like a painter just going crazy that's what happened and that's why they would come up like we say the tones go this really is cool you know and it wasn't like thinking well we'll just work at the club on Saturday night it was just let's just do it it sounds good to me and to these two other people in the room with me [Music]
23:39
[Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] pickles were the first to take the secrecy out of DJ because a lot of hip-hop DJ and was based on covering the
24:52
labels so that nobody knew he had not revealing your tricks and I think the pickles were the first people to just be like hey here's exactly how to do what we do we want you to go out and do it better so that we can learn from you that to me was like it took that was a giant step forward and they were so far ahead at the time that that people a lot of times crowds would just be like yeah they wouldn't violence that's what they did and that's why they became so well known I mean they're incredibly talented but that was something that sort of put
25:22
them on the map what made it unique was we all had our own individual styles I was in there like scratching horns and cue had this drum I was a scratch of some drums practicing and then Mike comes into the horn I don't know he just walks in the room and he started scratching with a horn and from there apology music whoa Apollo came in with the trumpet step and that's how it started we looked at each other while we were doing it sounds like a band right guys yep sounds like an actual bad [Music]
25:58
oh we felt totally like this this is it right we're doing something different than everyone else yeah we were totally like on a on another branch of hip-hop just from the early 90s that really weren't DJ's telling me someone albums anymore and actually a lot of rap groups didn't really even out deejays anyway that's the scene that we were ordered like totally not into we were totally just
26:33
all DJ kind of band and stuff you know I mean we love you know the rap and stuff it's just that what they were doing with the DJ's in the background and they're just filming stuff I was like yo this this this is not we just totally blocked it out and was just we were in our own world we were like on Jupiter or something but when David Paul came he was like yo let's make a album just a detail no MCS just y'all shining they were like all scratchin album what are you doing doors and open our minds to up
27:08
until the the return of the DJ album my goal was to DJ for popping the rap group and be on stage or someone in and being videos and stuff like that I never thought that I'd end up having my own album and did I'd be able to exist as a musician without the presence of an emcee and return of the DJ was like the start of that [Music] and you're in Jackson Heights Queens right now and that's basically why I was
27:47
born and raised I'm Spanish my parents are both Colombian and at our early age I was exposed to music like salsa and merengue and stuff like that [Music] during the early 90s you had club DJs house djs radio DJs mixtape DJs who did mixtapes and stuff like that we were like yo we want to have a concrete specific identity which I think baboo
28:22
was like the first person to actually even use the word turntables I told him that Inigo you know what man I'm not gonna call myself DJ Babu anymore I'm just gonna be called like Jay who calls himself the damage I only be called Babu the turntablist and that's what it was it was something that right on my mixtape so it was something that I named myself so then all of a sudden it just went just scattered you know he'll draw he dropped it a few places here and there table this to me the original turntable was his grand mixer DST not only was he integral part of the song
28:52
and the band he was like the highlight so much over to me to it so much over to it just the turntable is a musical instrument as long as you could see it being a musical instrument you're dealing with notes you're dealing with measures you're dealing with timing you're dealing with rhythm it's just you know different tools but the outcome is the same music
29:16
[Music] oh hey did you just play that song
30:23
[Music] yourself of Rocco mr. sinister represented execution is from Queens New York representing Brooklyn total eclipse
30:51
Rob Swift sometimes you just bump into different things that might sound good like that's what it is is freestyling some right now whose freestyler we draw
31:45
on one thing to sound really good so you feel me couldn't probably incorporate this or something else that we doing no all good ideas happen by accident [Music] [Music] no those people could just open a left after the third one you guys do the end [Music] the last barrel Brown filling right to
32:33
do the last we're trying to figure out is how to record music in a way that'll come off similar to the way our regular band would play music so on this side it could start off with one kick and snare and it'll evolve into something this is
33:14
basically a rub so be fur fur fur fur fur for fresh it's a tool to method of transcribing scratches it's helpful if you're trying to convey your composition of someone else when I start doing that I brought it to the DJ's a Rob Swift Babu and they're like oh this is this works so that I feel okay I got to develop and develop and that's where it is now where we got this little booklet this is a routine that Rob's wifted if you follow on here it's crap attention attention scratching boom scratch attention boom
33:45
scratching boon what is it what this is all about is the art of mixing its it's analog it's it's right in front of you they they don't need a delay line they're creating delays with beat juggling or with moving the fader and certain ways to stagger things inches into synthesis into stutter things and to manipulate time with your hands [Music] [Applause] [Music] [Applause] [Music]
34:17
[Applause] [Music] [Applause] [Music] my dad's a professional musician he wrote the have a coke and a smile jingle I don't know if you remember that but so I get a lot of my musical background from that I had like a traditional music upbringing I was always in the band I played piano and drums and started drums when I was seven and just all through high school marching band snare drum I can read music I played trumpet but with the scratching I had just heard like you
34:49
know like really easy simple stuff I was like oh anyone can do that but then I saw him and he's like doing all these crazy tricks and all these patterns that some I can't even play on the drums and I was just like oh my gosh I got to learn how to do that and he pushed me and a month after dating he moved in and we've been together for the last four years but turntables and we've been with him and I stopped making fun of it the first time I heard scratching really probably was like rocket it was
35:21
just like so different and just such a weird sound [Music] [Music] [Laughter] [Music]
36:14
[Music] yes it was hip-hopping it started like you know when it started but my mom had the actual records and hip-hop just showed me how to play toys my kids see it's to a circle circle I don't have a mixer when I bought my first set of 1200 I looked at I woke up the next morning hours and I looked at him and I said oh no what did I just do I just spent a whole lot of money on
36:49
turntable and then as I begin to gaze at him I said wait a minute I can make this work and I read some Theory book but they said if you practice for one year and give up everything women whine saw everything you give it all up you would be the best at what you do and that's basically what I did day in day out when I go to work he's getting ready I come back from work you're still practicing I go to sleep still practicing until I say it's enough
37:20
that I can't take any more what else don't break than you do okay I'll break the needles and then you can't play anymore watch out Steve D Johnny Cash and Shawn see like we used to hang out together and we used to go up to Steve on some practice and we started going with Steve see these battles because at the tombe Steve was like the eldest person out of us Oh Oh Dean the founder of beat juggling and
38:01
Steve D helped me realize that once you think you've reached the limit as an artist to what it is that you do once you believe that someone's gonna come along and prove you wrong [Music] battlin b-boying I'm saying that's where it all came from that's where hip-hop came from from being you know competitively from like trying to like knock the next guy down and trying to be the best but it's all fun you know I'm saying it ain't like real beef hip hop is asking you a question you know and that question is what are
38:33
you going to do so if that person is is considering himself hip-hop as far as battling or being a DJ or what-have-you he's asking you that question and this up to you to answer it and if you don't answer it you lose is a competition kind of like part of the American Way you know the same like are we all kind of raised to compete in the world and to get ahead the next person all the time I'm competitive with with anything you know I want to be the best at whatever I can be if it's drawing a straight line I
39:05
want to make this trip it's a lot because you know growing up in Harlem you know you have to be tough that way understand this is the [ __ ] DMC us finals somebody gonna leave there go represent for the US the MC stands for this comics Club it was a house music competition and then I'm DJ cheese from Plainfield New Jersey who was the 86 World Champion for DMC when he entered that year he introduced scratching into it and changed the whole battle and they
39:37
went along with it and let it be a hip-hop battle CMC is like you do a six minute routine you try to make that six minute routine the best overall I'm saying you're not really going up against one guy you're not trying to like battle this one got you're trying to battle everybody we did
40:11
12 heats this year and they all you know managed the win in their own cities or other people's cities and came out to battle so as everybody was always the first time [Music] back in the day TJ it was mostly like you know you'd mix you know if you could
40:47
mix two records you know just go n record you were cool you know and you you might have like a little you know a double beat here and there and then scratch and came along and that was the big thing you know scratch off you can scratch wow you could scratch and mix on every good form yeah if you can transform now oh that's another plus but then it took it just went bananas when people start to be juggling and then flaring and you know just then after that then came body tricks but I won the MC one final involved was like a big-time helps to be right at that point I guy used to come to his house practice just put my set
41:18
together like we just put our song together we just but I'll be dope if you do this at that point and just a lot of effort a lot of help you can watch a videotape and not realize how much time and energy was put into those six minutes months and months of practice you know Gaul boil down to six minutes [Applause] [Music]
42:11
[Applause] [Music] once you get in front of the set and it's like you're gonna compete against him this friend anymore I don't care less I'm gonna eat his kids you gotta try to act like you're the number one but it's all an act you know I'm saying inside you know I get nervous you do your routine 100 million times in your room you in front of like 500 hardcore hip-hop fans expect them to hear something you can be pretty fast you can be deejaying and scratching your records get [ __ ] you can go to like
42:53
move the pitch control your arm hits the needle oh [ __ ] [Music] I like the interesting ones Mysterio snake eyes you know the ones that come out bugged out they're not afraid to look different or do anything different [Applause] [Music] [Applause]
43:43
[Music] competition is a way to get seen as opposed such as DJ and out in the street in the park you know you get to reach a wider audience [Applause] [Music]
44:09
[Applause] the winner from tonight he goes to the MC World Championships and battles through the eliminations to see if he places a switch usually US DJ's do place and then he hoe eventually go up again sprays [Music]
44:57
when I was competing I would be I want to be the best you know I want to only learn all the tricks and put it together and put mines on top of it and flip everything you know and then I guess now I'm more like of a soul-searching where I kind of try to outdo what I did yesterday and couldn't just do for the love without competing as anyone else but myself now I just get over it it's so stressful and it's too much it's too much to like stress all year planning the routines even praise said it you know after this third time he's done whether he wins or loses in twenty years from now I want to look back and I want
45:28
to be like you know I had fun when I was like 20 and I was doing all this crazy [ __ ] with the turntablism stuff I want to look back and be like yeah man I was representing I was keeping it real you know saying I'm saying I'm having fun pick a card any cut no now let me just see let me see I got wrecked in effect I played with dougie that's my first pledge and then Toshi Nobu Kubota
46:00
Toshi for sure it then there's guy group Skywalker both times with 2 Live Crew Blackstreet it's all fun um when you DJ with a group because you get to showcase you if you ask some of the turntable is you know what groups you DJ for huh what group you know what I mean and it's like you can't tack any medals onto the trophy that they may have that's sitting there it's like they didn't go any further you know and I think that they
46:33
need to get um if they want to elevate the art form it has to be in a bigger platform you know what I mean with whether you're performing in the studio or performing with another kind of artist just take it there [Music] [Applause]
46:48
I got my first drum at five and then I started playing on a set at eleven twelve years old somewhere that it range
47:45
then I got into turntables or then I got into beat making then I got two turntables but I don't know how to play anything you know I don't have to play the piano anything melodic I don't know how to play [Music] turntable was originally something you walked away from when you put a record on you know you never thought to sit there and look at it and say what else can I do with this and I suppose you
48:16
never supposed to touch it yeah it was so hard to like don't touch the turn Tim yeah don't touch the record you're gonna ruin it I was 11 years old and I heard rocket I Herbie Hancock the DST scratching on it was ship ships through it and I grabbed the shirt but the Badou would do what it would do did with the verdad [Music]
49:01
[Applause] [Music] addressed create songs with each other we go about in different ways a lot of times Kedar I will have a beat and we will come to to the table with a beat are you guys feeling this yes or no sometimes they're in here writing it sometimes they write on their own sometimes they write together there's been tracks where the beats been playing in the studio why everybody's vibing out just talking
49:50
there's times when we don't really have the rhyme or the guys don't really have the rhyme together and they lay down this rock track just to see how it goes just to get the patterns and then you know the fluctuations and everything go back and fill them with the words so I can go later back and program it around what they're doing it's fun but it's always a challenge [Music] this right now I guess for what the media has portrayed us rap music very limited and I think with dilated we just brought it back to the basis I mean the
50:50
reason that I even connected with evidence in raqqa was because they didn't want to DJ for for fake reasons they didn't want someone up there you know they could add anybody they just wanted a stage prop DJ but they themselves are very involved in the and all the elements of the culture hip-hop they both started out as pro fede riders and apply those same mentality to their emceeing and evidence also as a producer so their respect for the DJ is goes without question you know so for me to be involved in any aspect of the group others reporting onstage interviews anything like that you know they told
51:21
including as it's complete throw to the group and feels right this is a show by now I put together for the Beastie Boys and I put like drum hits before each name so it sounds like [Music] the time Duane I'll start scratching some some roosters for no reason just totally flip them out
52:22
you know it's we're like I'm their maestro and it's like whatever I throw in they have no choice they have to rhyme over it this is basically most of them more or less the bulk of my collection I got a records dating back from you from the early 30s you know
52:53
saying got some vintage hip hop even got a little Chuck Berry right there Chucky baby yeah I got three or four hundred thousand altogether I have in the house doubles of a lot of things you know rare cuts and some garbage I know so many breaks man I mean I'm a walking encyclopedia and when it comes to break saying hip up in hip hop well they don't get too much by me you know I know it all I know it all I never sleep yeah
53:23
classic planet rock one particular thing that I remembered was going to see Afrika Bambaataa Planet Rock and jazzy J wasn't so funky it was great moving from one break to the next cutting two records together it was just wonderful and Bambaataa would be you know looking at the crowd you know being the sort of inscrutable master of records Sam would feed me the records not just go off once I get into his own it's like you can't even talk to me I start hopping back and forth one point took out a 45 slips it over
53:54
jazzy Jays shoulder BAM would point to the line play the second cut play second cut the break is right there puts on the 45 and this break comes to the end and then BOOM he lets it go and I was you know sitting there I was like wait what and it was it was the opening break from the Shirley Ellis record the clapping song which I think the last time I heard that I was 9 and I really liked it when I was 9 and all of a sudden everybody's dancing to
54:26
this funky break and I thought that's Afrika Bambaataa master of luck [Music] [Laughter] [Music] amongst all these records of [ __ ] that's probably here you know like your lawrence welk and earth when the fires not really [ __ ] rolling stones all these records that you're gonna have here
55:00
there might be that one diamond in the rough like that's really a rock and beat when you find that one that you know you're the only one that found you just kind of remember okay this is what it was all about you'd be digging for breaks or vocal samples and bass lines or weird children's records or whatever but it's the whole art of building up an arsenal so when you do go to a party you're different from the next guy my friend T ray he tells me these stories like you know cut he's from the south he's from South Carolina he's like you know cut you know I could go into a town and just
55:31
I could just smell the records it's like I pulled in and I oh honey we gotta stop there's some records in this town you know you're digging all day when you find that one record you know it's with the end of the clave you just you stink you know and it's it's the whole culture I mean it's that whole like you got on vinyl you have two copies on vinyl it's like that always thing you're asking like your druggie yeah you guys that this happened to me when I went to North Carolina okay just look in the yellow pages under our four records and we'll find stories phone pages ripped out somebody got there before us looking for records
56:03
I talked to tear a and he was just like oh yeah man oh no you you won't be able to find a phonebook with records in you know listed in there cuz I tore them all out already I'm like oh man [Music] DJ shadow he's the king of digging no one's iller than him he's got a a keen sense he's got the spidey sense he comes here regularly and spends day usually going through the wreckage downstairs
56:33
coming here the long time and he always comes up with a big stack of Records like that we don't let just anybody downstairs so he does have a special relationship in that sense this is just it's my little nirvana and being a DJ that that I take you know the art of digging seriously and this is just a place I've been going to for 11 years it's just an incredible archive of music culture and there's the promise in these
57:06
stacks of finding something that you're gonna use and in fact most of my first album was built off of records pulled from here so it has almost a karmic element of like you know I was meant to find this on top or I was meant to pull this out because it works so well with this so it's got a lot of meaning for me person [Music]
57:39
me and my my buddies stand that I used to dig with he's a graffiti writer we used to come here just looking for things like you know incredible Bongo band and stuff every now and then we buy things and a head or mark or someone will say oh yeah we got a ton of these in the basement or you know oh you should see the basement if you think this is something so after like five years of hearing this I just decided to just can I just take a look and we came down here I couldn't believe that there was still something like this a cache a
58:10
this large and the fact that it's relatively untouched [Music] just being in here is a humbling experience to me because you're looking through all these records and it's sort of like a big pile of broken dreams in a way almost none of these artists still have a career really so you have to kind of respect that in a way I mean if you're making records and if you're a DJ and then putting out you know releases whether it's mixtapes or whatever you're
58:40
sort of adding to this pile whether you want to admit it or not you know what I mean ten years down the line you'll be in here so keep that in mind when you start thinking like oh yeah I'm gonna vincible and I'm gonna I'm the world's best or whatever because that's what all these cats died [Music] over here is where I was digging and there was a mummified that under one of the records that was nice watch your
59:13
step here leave all the gas smells like gas I guess that's just the records I honestly feel like the people that dig don't stop digging cuz it's a part of who we are people that don't you don't have to it's not gonna make a bad DJ good I don't make a good DJ better we gonna do a songs that you never heard the phone doubled Ian Stein's keep put out lesson
59:44
three and it was like a couple years after he came out I heard it like in 86 and this was essentially like literally a lesson and all the old brakes being played by themselves from front to back in order a cohesive way that just you know it was groundbreaking lesson three it was a fusing of a lot of funk music and being able to take all these spoken word elements and it became this increasing series of left turns where all of a sudden it was like oh yeah
01:00:15
right great this isn't put Humphrey Bogart over this and I have this seance record that we can use when I heard that that was I mean over the years I always kept referencing that track so when it came time for me to make my first record I called it lesson four and just so happened that a few hundred miles away Cut Chemist was doing the same thing for the same reasons lesson two that was the first time I've ever heard breaks old records or on beats on him I listened to it I was like wow this record was made entirely from records and I just went
01:00:46
bananas I said this is it this is the missing piece you know for [Applause] so it's sort of like a once-in-a-lifetime thrill for us because we feel in stein ski to join us on stage for a lessons kind of reprise we're trying to use all the original records [Music] I'm like a radio DJ you know as the first record ends the next record begins and these guys real you know they knew
01:01:20
that that these were studio creations and they kind of looked at them and as oh yes this should be able to happen live which is amazing to me because we never even thought about that [Music] [Applause] a lot of the groups that was brought up on from the Commodores Earth Wind & Fire to our green Curtis Mayfield all that the sounds that they did back then they
01:01:51
don't do him like that no more they started getting into the computer generation and newer equipment and and that style died and the funk were dissident Center right here like it used to did something about that just that beat man it's emotion a certain way before you even hear vocals it's a driving force to me premier embodies the best possible combination of an innovator in the DJ realm and an innovator in the production well you
01:02:23
could tell he was a DJ first got good at that and then started making his own beats and just utilized records in every possible way and the artists I work with I always kind of hear the song before I do it and when it is when I start looking for samples or sounds another on old records or whatever I'm trying to find that sound that I heard in my head and until it sounds like what I'm looking for if I gotta search for a month until it sounds like what I'm looking for that's how long it's gonna take and Groo heard me
01:02:53
do my demos and again we put me in the game to Gangstar I knew that I should I don't deserve 50% of the money if I just DJ I gotta do something else that's what I started saying let me learn how to do beats then I'm putting my 50% into the group but I feel like if you're a DJ you should know how to produce tracks because we rearranged tracks and remixed tracks just from having records around so if you can do it in a party or make mixtapes you should be able to you know hot track [Applause]
01:03:25
[Music] I rock the mic when I'm on stage and I command a crowd and I do all that because I learned from the old school on how to get a crowd to cooperate it's a certain way you have to talk to them
01:04:00
you know if I chose to be an emcee believe me I tried to go through a lot more drama than I do as a DJ because of the fact that the emcee is more vocal so when you're speaking of voice like then you're selling over a hundred thousand albums you touch them so many people they're taking what you're saying to them and they're hoping that you are
01:04:45
what you talk and I would say it to guru every day he yelled and let us be about everything we drop because we're gonna get tested on it if we if the people on the street on tests are that God's gonna test us on it [Music] making your own vinyl is uh it adds a different level from when I was just playing other people's records and can just you know I kind of had to go with whatever their format was I've got this record that I put out that I made where
01:05:22
it's nothing but guitar tones and it's a whole octave so you can play it like an instrument [Music] it's kind of evolved people used to not like vinyl that was kind of setup for P game because they felt a bit cheating but son I think music started to be made anyway catered towards DJ's so records specifically for turntable lists and
01:06:07
battle DJ's and that sort of thing started popping up these are ultimate breaks and beats you know that hole digging and the kraits thing these kind of like helped a lot of guys find those breaks that just not around this was an opportunity for them to just like have these their hundreds all over the place this record contains seven different noises [Laughter] [Music] [Music] [Music]
01:07:48
[Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] you go to Japan you look on the billboards someone scratch and you look
01:08:58
them with commercials there's a DJ the video games coming out of there and have DJs on it the clubs everything everything is DJ or unit it's everywhere everywhere you go people are buying turntables people are scratching just than the amount of DJ's and it's thousands of new ones every day kids want turntables and a mixer when they graduate from high school they don't want a car then you know they want turntables and a mixer I'm gonna read through the order one more time so we're gonna start off with will DJ spaz second Daniel DJ problem so after Daniel we got
01:09:29
Mike DJ Tek David DJ static then we're going to do a set from the rapper's bad so anyway I think the most important thing is that you guys enjoy yourselves when you do it [Music] [Applause] [Music] it's a good thing to do with kids because they can put a record on they could feel like alright you know I'm making music and so you know they can
01:10:13
just come on the first day and be successful they're nervous enough just in class doing it in front of other kids sometimes you know but doing it here it's a huge room you know and even if they're all not standing right in front of the stage there's a hundred people in the room they're nervous it's cool to be
01:10:45
the one controlling the crowd you know what I'm saying all the kids around me my class is thinking oh god she's gonna teach you the next dance I said yeah I'll be there they'll be dancing scratching her because I'm use it for whatever that's cool no I'm saying we rappers but we'd be doing a little DJ you see the little shirt right here so DJ they cool because you know a lot of guys like it you know they'd be bumping in the cars and stuff like that this is the whole hip-hop yeah it's all about to do it probably like like scratching
01:11:19
[Applause] [Music] I heard that in England in the last few years that turntables are out selling guitars no doubt about it the deejay industry has doubled in size in the last year alone and has captured the American youth in the same style that youth were playing guitars and drums back in the 60s the turntables guys have really made a big splash their competitions like
01:11:55
disco mix club ITF have really filled innovation and people like that Q Barkin and Rock Raider Mix Master Mike it's definitely booming hip-hop has been wonderful to us as a company when they have a demonstration you know it's just the area's packed who knows people standing all over the place we've had some legendary guitar players
01:12:27
be ten or twelve feet well you know I spent all this time would shame to learn all these like licks and everything you know musical theory and everything and these guys come along you know scratching up the place I've tried out myself and I didn't know what they're doing they could do some really neat stuff with it but I guess honestly I hope it doesn't become the other one instrument out there just be elected turntable can entertain you for a while but if you're only entertained that way then you are eventually going to be done kind of a silly way of being and noise it's not too Pleasant two
01:12:57
years without musical interpretation what do they have the scratch what are they going to do when electricity runs out they're stuck with acoustic guitars [Laughter] let's get a record regular record any record will work have your little vinyl killer man you can see myself shortcut key word here riding the man with the needle on turn on the van [Applause] [Applause]
01:13:59
[Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Applause] [Music] [Music] well after the 60s sort of identified it with the whole Grateful Dead concert I think we're in completely a new culture right now which I feel that the invisible scratch pickles initiated and now with a lot of the other crews around
01:15:21
but the area you have a whole new energy source for Filipinos American Filipinos at least we don't really have role models you know as far as mass media goes you know there's no athletes there's no actors you know we have our parents and Cubert and you know whether cue bikes are just likes the idea he's very much a role model you see it you know even the Australian DJ champs are a couple Filipino guys you know what I mean it's it's it's more than a coincidence you know and I really attribute it to Qbert and Mike and Apollo like putting a visa out there's so much visible scratch pickles presence
01:15:52
you just kind of go oh because you know I mean they're the most influential DJ's that have ever lived [Applause] [Music] [Applause] [Music] that's not they're disbanding as the invisible scratch pickles they're not gonna use that name anymore and the Morgan Asura just do like solo things and it's like The Sex Pistols they it was like they broke up at the peak it was perfect
01:16:33
our Operation Ivy the day their album came out they broke up I'm waiting for the DJ PlayStation game you got your Burger King DJ you don't mean we got your [ __ ] uh you got your la gel commercials with some [ __ ] DJ what the [ __ ] is that what does a turntable have to do with your hair I'm sure that happened a breakdancing is gonna happen a DJ and to you not only the true [ __ ] will survive and still be doing it 20 years from now and then there will be all those fools that you
01:17:05
jump on it for you know for the trend of it that's the whole thing we got so kind of tired of the MCS [ __ ] you guys you know we're going to do our own thing but now we're kind of screwing ourselves because we're almost kind of doing what the the MCS were doing we're taking this DJ thing and no one's pushing the boundaries everyone gets up there and they just do their little deliver I go to the next guy he does a little deal know it's throwing in any originality and we're just kind of getting typecast into this oh that's turntablism or that - turntable music I know the boundaries of that I know where that's gone yeah these new kids they got like ten records and they're just battle records
01:17:36
you know that's that's their collection forever and then big guys don't know when that record wears out they're gonna buy it again like a lot of scratch DJ's and and DJ's that are like bowel deejays don't know the first thing about digging for records and have to rock a party you know how to get on the mic it's really important to get on the mic and speak to the crowd people should make music to make people want to party and not just like make music for people to study you know should make you wanna party and shake your ass why does that Sonny dance for it I said why does it gotta be studied I want it back I want it dirty I
01:18:07
want it crunchy raw want to get them to most of the world you know this whole culture and this thing is maybe 20 years old you know what I mean if that and we're just on the brink of something new and and I just know right now it doesn't really bother me because I just know I look at the kids we're into it now they're obsessed like I am and I just can't imagine what its gonna be like when they're the older ones when they're making decisions with it when they're gonna say what school what sells
01:18:41
what is fine music what is not ladies and gentlemen this is an experimental records it's an experimental for me and I will be expand little for you there's always improvising we've got our
01:19:21
turntables we got a crowd and the collective goal making the crowd rock [Music] jaeseok a party and there's DJ's who can really cut well well what we try to do with the future primitive is bring those worlds together the party rocker the guy who collects deep brakes the producer minded individuals people who were like in there digging non-stop that's the backbone like in a jazz band that's the drummer then you have the soloist the turntable is that the scratcher taking you on those abstractions
01:19:56
[Music] I always thought that anything that flows and you can find parallels to and merge excite anything about hip-hop is it was already doing that originally you know the four elements breakdancing DJing graffiti and emceeing they're trying to marry a lot of different styles and a lot of different clothes like with those he paints behind it that that same fluidity in the way he paints and what's happening in the mix there's
01:20:37
definitely a parallel there when I'm painting to a DJ in a club the DJ talks to me I talk to the audience hip-hop is the lifeblood of my work and turntablism is the next step and it and it coincides with the auto visual package of future primitive the DJ gets the b-boys going you know I'm saying the brakes and whatnot they've always been the architects the foundation of the chance to are the MC they're the conductor's
01:21:07
they're the ones who leads you to where you want to go rhythm is really important it's like if you want to reach that spiritual kind of medium in in your soul it's like it's like the Indians when they when they want to speak to the gods and stuff it would have like a rain dances and that would be about the drums you know I'm after after a while the drums just get hypnotic and stuff in this and they go into a trance and so music is a trance and you sing like hypnotic get you in that spiritual state
01:21:35
[Music] [Applause] [Music] it's called the zone or a Nirvana you're just totally just just all into it you know you just just getting the whole it's like you're not you're not playing the instruments like you're the instrument and the universe is playing
01:22:31
you it's some kung fu stuff finally you're just in there you you don't feel it yours flowing nothing can stop you [Music] [Music] [Applause] [Music] [Applause] [Music] [Applause] I used to go out an April 14 a mix of
01:23:21
txt and tonight I want a night Qbert [Music] [Applause] [Music] you know we're staying at a charity and you sit down you watch to determine you think about what you're going to do with that turntable freak people out it's a heavy thing something that you
01:23:53
interact with that somebody takes something to the next level everyone is
01:24:34
one everything everything is one whole big ball of energy kind of like the Star Wars thing about the force everything is just everyone's connected with and we're all just like one energy like we think we're separated but everyone affects everyone when you find out you're not separated it's like say say like everyone is that a limb of a one-hole thing so why would you want to hurt your hand or hurt your fingers hurt your arms when you know that that person is part of you so in order to help people I make music for them and you know teach people
01:25:04
about scratching and and I guess try to brighten up their lives or whatever we do that's my whole destiny on this earth cue garden Mix Master Mike and they all tell me hey man when we saw you that was it we you know and I know that I've affected the population of the player that's a great girl I feel that people today are realizing that what they're doing now came from somewhere and not afford to go any further I has to go around and 360 in order for it to go even further and I always say you have
01:25:35
to know where hip-hop's been in order to know where is going we have to while was no dings goes into cycles and it's all coming together I just hope to see it be intergalactic since we are becoming galactic humans you know we trying to get to Mars Jupiter all right so I'm ready to see it on all the other planets in our solar system not the nine planets but the twelve or thirteen is out there that's what I'd like to do good show world you know there's muster some really cool out
01:26:06
there I'm different [Music] [Applause] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Applause] you you I'm somebody as a scratch they should give me a dollar you know you know well you know you know I really feel that
01:27:31
[Music] you [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] you you [Music]
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[Music] [Applause]
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[Music]

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