Солярис. Серия 1 (фантастика, реж. Андрей Тарковский, 1972 г.)

Солярис. Серия 1 (фантастика, реж. Андрей Тарковский, 1972 г.)

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Language: English

Type: Human

Number of phrases: 499

Number of words: 3307

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00:47
MOSFILM NATALYA BONDARCHUK DONATAS BANIONIS YURI YARVET VLADISLAV DVORZHETSKY NI KOLAI GRI NKO ANATOLY SOLONITSYN I N THE FI LM SOLARIS Based on the Science Fiction Novel by STANISLAW LEM Screenplay by F. GORENSHTEl N, A. TARKOVSKY Directed by ANDREl TARKOVSKY Cinematographer VADI M YUSOV Production Designer MI KHAI L ROMADI N Music EDUARD ARTEMYEV Sound SEMYON LITVI NOV SOLARIS Part One Kris, come here.! You're just in time. He takes a walk every morning for at least an hour. I forbade him to come back earlier. He's had a lot of work, sometimes staying up all night.
07:00
These Solarists! He reminds me of a bookkeeper, preparing his accounts. We expected you yesterday. He wanted to run away when he saw me. Hello. Hello. I probably shouldn't have bothered you today. How old you and I have become. I've only just realized that. What are you apologizing for? Does he understand that everything depends on his first report from the station? Everything we've received so far has been confusing or incomprehensible. If he confirms that the work can't continue for some reason, the station can be taken out of Solaris' orbit. He understands. You promised to talk to him. I brought the film. That's what I came here for. - Yes, of course. Can the boy stay with you for a few days? I have a lot to do and no one to leave him with. Anna will look after him. She'll have more free time now. When does he leave? He'll be gone by tomorrow morning.
08:44
It's so pleasant here. This house reminds me of my grandfather's house. I really liked it. So we decided to build one just like it. I don't like innovation. I'd better get going. I have a lot to do. Don't you want to see this? I've already seen it many times. On the 21 st day of our expedition, radiobiologist Vishyakov and physicist Fechner went on an exploratory flight over the Solaris Ocean in a hydroplane. When they failed to return after 16 hours, we declared an emergency. The fog was thick and we were forced to call the search off. All of the rescue craft returned to the station except for the helicopter operated by Burton. Burton returned an hour after dark. Once out of the helicopter, he ran to his quarters. He was in a state of shock. You understand, this was highly unusual for a man with 11 years of experience flying in space. He recovered in a couple of days,
11:29
but he would never leave the station and refused to approach the window overlooking the Ocean. Later he wrote to us from the clinic. He was preparing a statement of great importance, one that would decide the fate of Solaristics. Excellent. Let's hear what he has to say. At this time, let us give the floor to Burton. Thank you. When I first descended below 300 meters, I had trouble maintaining altitude. There was a strong wind. All of my attention went towards operating the ship. I did not look out of the cabin. As a result, I wound up in a fog. - Was it an ordinary fog? Of course not. It seemed to be colloidal and viscous. It coated all of the windows. Because of the fog's resistance, I began to lose altitude. I couldn't see the sun, but the fog glowed red in its direction. After half an hour I came out into a large, open space.
12:59
It was almost round, a few hundred meters across. At that point, I noticed a change in the Ocean. The waves disappeared. The surface became almost transparent, with clouded patches. Yellow sludge gathered beneath it. It rose up in thin strips and sparkled like glass. Then it began to seethe, boil... and harden. It looked like molasses. This sludge or slime gathered into large lumps and slowly formed different shapes. I was being drawn into the fog, so I had to struggle against this for some time. When I looked down again, I saw a sort of... A sort of garden. A garden? Attention, please. I saw shrubs, hedges, acacia trees, little paths. Everything was made of the same substance. Did these trees and plants have leaves? These shrubs... and... acacias?
14:18
No, I already said they were all made of plaster, but life-sized. Then everything began to crack and break. Yellow sludge poured out of the fissures. Everything began to boil even harder, and foam appeared. You can see for yourselves. I used a camera from time to time. Everything I saw before and after should be on film. Then I propose we interrupt these discussions and see everything with our own eyes. All right, show us your film. This is very interesting. Is that it? That's all of your film? Yes, that's everything. But we don't understand. You filmed clouds. Why did you film clouds? That must be the fog I told you about. I wasn't expecting this. All of this could be the result of Solaris's biomagnetic current acting on Burton's consciousness. We now know the current is not only a gigantic cerebral system,
17:08
but a substance capable of thought processes. That hypothesis is questionable. Were you feeling sick that day? The next part is meaningless. Let's pick up here. I discovered something floating in one of the openings. It looked like Fechner's space suit. Its shape was that of a person. I turned around, because I didn't want to lose sight of that spot. At that moment, the figure rose slightly, as if it were swimming or treading the waves. This person had no space suit, and he was moving. I dont understand."Person"? Yes, person. Just a minute. Did you see his face? Yes. What person? And... who was it? It was a child. What child? Had you seen him before? No, never. In any case, not that I remember. When I flew closer to him,
18:42
I noticed something awful. What do you mean? I couldn't...I couldn't make it out at first. Then I saw that he was unusually large. Gigantic. He was about four meters tall. He had blue eyes and dark hair. Perhaps you're not feeling well? Hm? We'll postpone the meeting. I'll continue. He was naked, absolutely naked, like a newborn. He was wet, or rather, slippery. His skin was shiny. He rose and fell like the waves, but he was moving by himself. It was disgusting. I'm sorry. I'll jump ahead a little. There isn't much more. Burton's statements appear to be the result of a hallucinatory complex
20:15
brought on by the planet's atmosphere, as well as symptoms of depression exacerbated by inflammation of the associative zone of the cerebral cortex. This report in no way, or in almost no way, corresponds with reality. What do you mean "almost"? Excuse me, I'm not finished yet. Professor Messenger offers a different opinion. He believes that Burton's statements could be founded in reality and merit further study. That's it. I saw it all with my own eyes. I would like to offer another opinion. We stand on the brink of an enormous discovery, Our decision should not rely on the observations of a man without any scientific qualifications. Although any researcher may envy this pilot, his presence of mind, his gift of observation. Moreover, in light of recent information, we are morally obligated to continue the exploration.
21:36
I can understand how Professor Messenger feels. I understand him. But let's take a look at the road we've traveled. Solaristics is exactly where it began. Years of work have been in vain. Everything we now know about Solaris is negative and has come to resemble a mountain of disjointed, incoherent facts that strain credulity. We're in exactly the same situation today. Solaristics is degenerating. But what we're talking about is far more serious than just the study of Solaristics. We'e talking about the boundaries of human knowledge. Don't you think that by establishing artificial barriers we deliver a blow to the idea of limitless thought? By limiting our movement forward, we facilitate moving backwards. I nevertheless repeat my question. What do you mean by saying the report of my observations in "almost" no way corresponds with reality? I saw everything with my own eyes.
22:52
What do you mean by "almost"? "Almost no way" means that some real phenomena could have triggered your hallucinations, Burton. When it's windy, it's easy to confuse a swaying bush with a living being, to say nothing of a foreign planet. I meant no offense, Burton. None. I'd like to know what impact Professor Messenger's opinion will have. Practically none, which means that exploration in this area will be discontinued. Just a moment. Yes... I'd like to make a statement. The commission has not offended me, but it has offended the spirit of the expedition. Therefore, I consider it my duty to announce... And so on... Nowadays it's considered good manners to laugh when Burton's report is mentioned. Thank you, Burton. We've known you for a long time, but I never knew anything about you. You know, you were very handsome. That's not true, but thanks anyway.
24:10
Excuse me. Well, Kris, what do you think? If you don't mind, I'd like to speak to your son alone. I don't want to look like an idiot in front of you yet again. I'll wait for you outside by the swing. What a ridiculous man. You have no reason to say that. He's ill at ease. He thinks he's getting in the way of our farewell. He's a tactful man. If he decided to come, it's because he considers this important. Although, I admit, I'd rather not see anyone now. You and I rarely get a chance to talk. I'm glad to hear you say that. Even if it's on the last day. The last day. One always feels awful after a big farewell. Here comes your aunt. Let's meet after lunch. We need to talk. Why did you have to invite this Burton today of all days?
26:01
Where are the guests going to sleep? Next to you, or in the room upstairs? Upstairs, I guess. Well, I'm off to my meeting by the swing. - Maybe... - Just a moment. You and your rooms can wait! Listen, Kris... What happened? - What's standing over there? - What are you afraid of? In the garage, staring at me. It's a horse. Don't. I've seen it already. Come on. He's gentle. Look how beautiful he is. You understand, I think Solaristics has reached an impasse as a result of irresponsible daydreaming. I'm interested in the truth, but you want to turn me into a biased supporter. I don't have the right to make decisions based on impulses of the heart. I'm not a poet. I have a concrete goal: Either stop the research and remove the station from orbit, thereby legitimizing the Solaristics crisis, or take extreme measures. Perhaps bombard the Ocean with heavy radiation. - Not that! - Why not? Didn't you say research should continue at any price?
27:56
You want to destroy that which we are presently incapable of understanding? Forgive me, but I am not an advocate of knowledge at any price. Knowledge is only valid when it's based on morality. Man is the one who renders science moral or immoral. Remember Hiroshima. Then don't make science immoral. It's strange... Strange. There's nothing strange about it. You yourself can't be sure that what you saw wasn't just hallucinations. Thank you very much. It's seems there's nothing more to discuss. - What happened? - I'm leaving. Where are you going? He's an accountant, not a scientist. You were right. You and I are friends, but that doesn't mean you can say that about him. Great. You and I have known each other for 20 years. It had to end someday. Are you leaving the boy? What did you have to offend him for? You're too harsh. It's dangerous to send people like you into space. Everything there is too fragile. Yes, fragile! The Earth has somehow become adjusted to people like you,
29:30
although at what sacrifice! What, are you jealous that he'll be the one to bury me, and not you? <i>Thus, it had been established that</i> <i>the Solaris Ocean is a distinctive brain. <i>Right after that, an even more daring</i> <i>hypothesis came out, <i>suggesting that the Ocean</i> <i>is a thinking substance. <i>Incidentally, this hypothesis <i>still cannot be confirmed or refuted. It's a program about Solaris. <i>There are few believers left. <i>First of all, there are those connected</i> <i>to the fate of the Solaris station. <i>On this huge station</i> <i>built to house 85 people <i>there is now a crew of three. <i>They are: Astrobiologist Sartorius, <i>cyberneticist Snaut, <i>and physiologist Gibarian,</i> <i>who deal with the problem... <i>I</i>'<i>m calling from the city. Burton. Anna, leave for a minute. We need to talk. <i>I didn</i>'<i>t talk to Kris</i> <i>about what was most important: <i>About Messenger, who voiced</i> <i>a different opinion at that meeting. <i>He became very interested in Fechner,</i> <i>who died in the Solaris Ocean.
31:13
<i>It turns out that Fechner</i> <i>has an orphaned son. <i>He had left his family. <i>Messenger and I paid a visit</i> <i>to Fechner</i>'<i>s widow, <i>and I saw this boy with my own eyes. You never told me about that. <i>I never got the chance. Fine. Go on. <i>This child was identical</i> <i>to the one I saw on Solaris. Of course, he wasn't four meters tall. He shouldn't think about this too much before liftoff, but he should keep it in mind. There's no point in keeping these papers. The ones to hold on to are in my room. My research notes, my thesis... I held on to so much. If something should happen, I'll find someone to take care of them. I'll come up with something. Don't look for that film. I'm taking it with me. Remember? The one of the bonfire? Yes, of course. - Ready, Kelvin?</i> <i>- Ready, Moddard. <i>Don</i>'<i>t worry about a thing. Have a great trip. Send our regards.
41:28
- When is liftoff? - You're already flying, Kris! Take care. Solaris station! Do something! I'm losing stability. This is Kelvin, over. Hey, where is everyone? You've got guests. Dr. Snaut? Snaut? I'm Kelvin, the psychologist. It looks like you weren't expecting me. Did you receive the radiogram? Yes, of course. What's with you? Forgive me. Where's Gibarian? Where's Sartorius? Sartorius is in his quarters. Gibarian is dead. What do you mean "dead"? Suicide. I beg your pardon. I knew Gibarian and he would never have... He was almost always in a state of deep depression ever since these disturbances began... Why don't you go rest, take a bath?
47:33
Take any room and come back in an hour. I would like to see Gibarian - I mean, Sartorius. Later. I doubt he'd see you now. He's upstairs, in the laboratory. Listen, Snaut, I understand that something extraordinary has happened and maybe... Dr. Kelvin... You understand... Come back in an hour. Please. Go and rest. Listen, there are only three of us: You, me and Sartorius. You know us from our photographs. If you see something out of the ordinary, something besides me and Sartorius, try not to lose your head. What would I see? I don't know. That sort of depends on you. Hallucinations? No. Just remember. - Remember what? - That we're not on Earth. You know, it would be better if you came back in the evening, or at night.
48:50
No, let's make it tomorrow morning. A. GI BARIAN HUMAN BEl NG FOR K. KELVI N <i>Hi, Kris. <i>I still have a little time left. <i>There are some things</i> <i>I must tell you, <i>and some things</i> <i>I must warn you about. <i>By now you</i>'<i>re at the station</i> <i>and know what happened to me. <i>If not, Snaut or Sartorius</i> <i>will tell you. <i>What happened to me... <i>is not important. <i>Or rather, it cannot be explained. <i>I</i>'<i>m afraid that what happened to me</i> <i>is only the beginning. <i>I wouldn</i>'<i>t, of course,</i> <i>want it to happen... <i>but this could happen to you</i> <i>and the others. <i>Here, it could probably</i> <i>happen to anyone. <i>Just don</i>'<i>t think</i> <i>that I</i>'<i>ve lost my mind. <i>I</i>'<i>m of sound mind, Kris.</i> <i>Believe me.
52:44
<i>After all, you know me. <i>If I have enough time,</i> <i>I</i>'<i>ll tell you why I did everything. <i>I</i>'<i>m telling you this so that,</i> <i>if it does happen to you, <i>you</i>'<i>ll know it</i>'<i>s not madness. <i>That</i>'<i>s the most important thing. <i>As for continuing research, <i>I</i>'<i>m leaning towards</i> <i>Sartorius</i>'<i>proposal, <i>subjecting the Ocean</i>'<i>s plasma</i> <i>to heavy radiation. <i>I know it</i>'<i>s prohibited,</i> <i>but there</i>'<i>s no other choice. <i>We... <i>You will get mired in it. <i>It may offer a way</i> <i>ofbreaking this deadlock. <i>This is our only chance</i> <i>to make contact with this monster. <i>There is no other choice, Kris. <i>Lf... Dr. Sartorius, I am Kelvin. I arrived two hours ago. Listen, this is ridiculous.
57:16
Either open up or I'll break down the door. All right, I'll open the door, but don't come in. I'll come out. - Fine. My name is Kelvin. Go on. You must have heard of me. I work, or worked, with Gibarian. Go on. Snaut told me about Gibarian. Then you already know the story. Yes, it's horrible. I don't know the details, but he's dead. That's not the problem. We all die. But he insisted on being buried on Earth. Is space really such a bad grave for him? But Gibarian wanted to be in the ground, with the worms. I wanted to disregard it, but Snaut insisted. - Have you ever heard of Burton? - He was the pilot who... Yes, he was in the search party for Fechner. Fechner died a magnificent death, but Gibarian was a coward. There's no point talking badly of him now. It's at least worth talking about duty. Duty to whom?
58:26
- To truth. - You mean to people. You won't find truth there. Look. Your position is absurd. Your so-called courage is inhuman! You hear me? Go away. You're too impressionable. You must get used to everything. Good day. I spoke to Sartorius. He's a rotten person. He's a very talented scientist. I think I'm a little sick. There's nothing wrong with you. You just won't take advice. Snaut, aside from the three of us, is there anyone else on the station? Did you see someone? What were you warning me about? Whom did you see? Was it a human being? Is she real? Can she be touched? Wounded? You saw her today. And you? Who the hell are you? Quiet. - Where did she come from? - Leave me alone.
01:03:10
You're afraid. Don't worry. I won't think you're insane. Insane? God, you know absolutely nothing! Insane... That would be a blessing. Listen, Snaut... <i>It</i>'<i>s all so senseless. <i>They won</i>'<i>t understand me.</i> <i>They think I</i>'<i>ve gone crazy. <i>Do you see, Kris,</i> <i>how it</i>'<i>s not entirely absurd? <i>I have to do this because</i> <i>I</i>'<i>m afraid they</i>'<i>ll come in here. <i>I mean Snaut and Sartorius. <i>They themselves don</i>'<i>t understand</i> <i>what they</i>'<i>re doing. <i>I</i>'<i>m afraid, Kris... <i>I can</i>'<i>t... <i>Nobody will be able to understand. <i>Open up.! You hear, Gibarian?</i> <i>Open up.! <i>Don</i>'<i>t be stupid.</i> <i>It</i>'<i>s just us-Snaut and Sartorius. <i>We want to help you. <i>They want to help me. <i>Just a second. Quit knocking. <i>I am my own judge. <i>Have you seen her? <i>Kris, understand that</i> <i>this is not madness.
01:05:58
<i>It has something to do</i> <i>with conscience. <i>I really wanted you</i> <i>to get here in time, Kris. Where did you...? It's so nice. But... but it's not... How did you know where I...? What do you mean, "how"? Don't, Kris. That tickles. Where are my shoes? - Shoes? No. They're not there. Who's this? Kris... it's me. You know... I have the feeling... as if I've forgotten something. I can't understand it.

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