Procedural Nodes For Beginners (Blender Tutorial)

Procedural Nodes For Beginners (Blender Tutorial)

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in this beginner tutorial i'm going to introduce you to procedural nodes in blender so procedural nodes is a really cool feature in blender and it will allow you to create some really cool things so you can see right here up on the screen these are a bunch of procedural materials that i've created using procedural nodes but there's even cooler stuff you can do with procedural nodes you may have seen online some really cool stuff where they use like displacements and they actually like create 3d models and things and then they actually like texture it and animate it and do things like that you
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may have seen that kind of stuff online there's some really really cool stuff you can do with procedural nodes in blender and once you're finished watching this beginner tutorial on procedural nodes then i'd highly recommend watching my procedural material playlist on youtube i'll have a link in the description to the playlist and i'll also throw a card right up there on the screen in that playlist i create a bunch of different procedural materials and i show you the entire process and go step by step and explain what i'm doing as i create it so those procedural material tutorials would be a
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great thing to check out after you watch this video i'll also be throwing timestamps in the video description and blocking out the different sections of this video so if you want to watch a certain part then you can check that out and in the youtube timeline the timestamps will be displayed as well so what exactly is a procedural material or procedural nodes well what a procedural material is is it's a material that doesn't use any external files so for instance you could go onto a website like ambient cg or you could go onto a website like cg bookcase and you could
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download some texture maps and then you could put the texture maps into blender and then you can plug them up and then it'll be a realistic material and that works really well but that's not a procedural material because you need some kind of external file or an image texture or an external texture map on your computer and you have to put that in the blender so you can sort of think about procedural materials as you're kind of coding the texture so you use different things like procedural noise textures and other things like color ramps and you can also use math nodes and things like that and you're creating
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those materials using the nodes which are built in a blender and what's so cool about this is that they're adjustable so you can kind of change it and make it how you like you can scale it up or down you could have more rust or less rust you can make the bump bigger or smaller and once you have a good understanding of the procedural nodes then you can go ahead and create your own materials real quick before we continue the video i want to thank this video's sponsor sketchfab buy sell and even upload your own 3d models on sketchfab my favorite feature of sketchfab is that you can preview 3d
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models in your browser and even view them on a phone tablet or in ar and vr they also have a huge 3d model store where you can purchase models and assets you can even apply to sell your own models on the platform check out sketchfab with the link in the description so as i'm introducing you to the procedural nodes i want something to preview the materials on so what i did is i just pressed shift a and i went over here to the icosphere and then right behind me on those icosphere settings i just clicked on this and opened it up and then i turned the subdivisions way up to like a six so
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it's very high detail and then i just shaded this object smooth then what i also did is added a camera i just pointed the camera right at the sphere here and then i also added in a sun lamp and i turned up the brightness a little bit and gave it a very slightly yellow color and then for the world what it is just went to the world and i clicked right here on the little yellow dot and i changed it to a sky texture then i played around with some of these settings and i just made this cool like evening kind of look and this way it's just going to give us some lighting on
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this sphere so that we can see our procedural nodes better you could also just download like a free hdri from polyhaven.com really it doesn't matter you can just grab some simple bass mesh and then just give it some decent lighting and then let's go over to this shading tab so i'm just going to go into rendered mode right up here and then right over here i have the shader editor so now we can do is right up here i can just click on new and then we can just call this procedural material i'm just going to call it procedural material and then also i am using cycles render if you didn't notice that i'm using the
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cycles render engine if you want to use ev you can but i am going to be using cycles because cycles is more realistic and there are a few nodes that don't work with ev most procedural nodes do work with ev but i just like cycles better before we continue though with the other procedural nodes i just want to go over the different shortcut keys so that you can navigate so if you want to select these nodes you can just click on them to select them that's pretty basic i'm using the right click select so i right click to select but on default it's left click select and blender so you're probably just going to left click select so just select the
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nodes however you normally would select things in blender and then if you want to move around your procedural setup you can click and hold with your middle mouse wheel and then just move around and that's just going to look around sort of like if you're in the 3d view in blender you can use your middle mouse wheel you can use your middle mouse wheel here just to move around and look around and this is not going to move the nodes this is just moving your view if you want to move the nodes you can just click on it and drag them you can also press g to grab just like in the 3d cider blender if you press g to grab it's going to move the objects you can
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press g to grab and it's going to move the nodes or you can just click and drag and then if you want to select or deselect multiple nodes or all the nodes it's the a button so just like the 3d side of blender it's a to select and a to deselect and then what you can also do if you want to just select specific ones is you can select one of them hold down the shift key and then select the other one just like in the rest of blender now you can also click and drag and that's going to do this box select you can also press b for the box select just like in the 3d side of blender
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if you press t to open the t panel you can see that on default we're on the select box so you can just click and drag and that's going to bring up the box select or you can just press b now if you want to duplicate nodes sometimes you do need to duplicate nodes just like in the 3d side of blender it's shift d so shift d will duplicate the node and you can see that now i've duplicated it so now we have two principled bsdfs and don't worry if this is all a bit overwhelming you don't need to remember all these shortcut keys right now you can learn them in time now if you want
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to delete objects again just like the 3d side of blender you can select it and then you can press x to delete or you can also press the delete key and that will delete a node now you can see that this principle bsdf has this little wire right here and the wire is going from the end of the principle and it's going over into the material output and then it's going into this socket right here and while you're setting up procedural nodes this is the workflow that you're going to use so you're going to add nodes and then you're going to plug different nodes into each other and then what you're going to do is you're going
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to change different things so you're going to change these different values you can see like for instance this is a base color so you could like change it i'll just make it like blue and then you're going to plug things into each other you can see there's all these slots here that you can plug things into now again don't worry if this seems really complicated and there's a bunch here most of the time you're actually not going to use very many of these there's just a few things that you're going to use most of the time like for instance a base color you're going to use that one a lot and there are a few others i will go over the main ones that you're going to use but back over to this wire here you can see that this
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little wire is going over and then it's plugging into the material output so as you're working with procedural nodes you're going to need to plug things up you're also going to need to unplug things and you also might want to cut wires if you want to get rid of them so you can just click and then drag and then let go to unplug it and then just click on the little dot drag over and you can see once you get really close it automatically connects it you can just let go that is one way but for instance let's say that i like duplicate this so i'm going to select it press shift d now you wouldn't use two material outputs
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you'd only use one but let's just say that i click and drag and you can see there's another wire and i'm going to plug this up let's say that you have multiple wires and you want to cut all of them what you can do is you can hold down the control key and then right click and drag and you can see that your mouse turns into a little knife icon and you can cut the wires and then just let go and you can see that it cuts both of them so that is super useful if you've like set up a big thing and you have a bunch of wires and you just want to cut all of them you can do that so another thing is that if you have a really big
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procedural setup and you have tons of nodes you might want to organize them a little bit better and it might be a little bit confusing if you have like all these wires plugging into different nodes so what you can do is you can add what's called a reroute so how you add a reroute is you hold down the shift key and then you right click and drag see this time it turns into a little crosshair and you can drag over the two nodes and then let go and you can see that it adds in this little reroute right here it's just a little dot and if you're confused about which dot this is
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like what data or what material is this basically this is always just going to be an extension of the one behind it so because this is a principle bsdf it's just an extension for this so once you have a really big complex setup you can use this to organize your nodes a little bit better now this is totally optional and you totally don't need these but if you want to when you have a really big setup you could use that so you can hold down the shift key right click and drag and you can see it's going to add another one so you could like move this like for instance if you want to like go like this maybe move this up maybe add
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another one something like this you can see i can move this over so you can see that the re-routes help a bit um so it kind of routes up here goes over here but really it's just the same thing it's not going to change the material at all you could just plug these up like this and then you can just click on these and press x to delete and that doesn't look quite as nice but it's the same thing so it's not actually going to change the look of your shader now again just like with the 3d side of blender if you are in edit mode and you want to fill a face if i just get rid of this if you click on this and then shift click on this or
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just have them both selected you can press f and just like in the 3d setup blender how that fills the face f is going to fill these two wires together and then there may be some cases where you want to delete a node but keep it plugged up so for instance you don't need to follow me on this you can if you want to i'm just going to click on the add here and then i'm going to go right down here to shader and i'm going to add a mix shader right here i'm going to add the mix shader and then i can actually just drop it right in here so if you click on a node and drag it you can see that if you put it in front of the wire
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or over the wire the wire is actually going to light up and then if you let go blender is automatically going to add it in but then let's say i want to delete this i could press x and delete and then plug this back up but there's actually a quicker way to do this so if i want to delete this but then have this continue to be wired up instead of pressing x to delete and then replugging it up what you can do is you can press control x and that way it's going to delete the node but it's going to keep it plugged up all right now before we really get into all the different nodes i want to introduce you to the node wrangler
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add-on now the node wrangler add-on isn't something that you have to install and then download it's actually built into blender so you just have to enable it so how you enable it is you go right up here to edit and then go to the preferences and then over here in the user preferences you're just going to click on add-ons and then right over here on the search you're just going to start to type in node and you can see that there is this node wrangler add-on so check mark that and then if you want it to be in all your future blender projects you can click on the save preferences button and if for some reason the save preferences button isn't
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there it might be because the autosave preferences is turned on and in that case it would automatically save the preferences so let's just close the user preferences now so the node wrangler add-on is an amazing add-on and it has quite a bunch of different features which can help you while you're creating your procedural setup now the main feature of the node wrangler add-on is to preview different nodes so for instance if i click on this principle the sdf and i press shift d and click and drag it over here and then just for a further example i'm going to click on the add right here i'm going to click on
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the search and i'm going to start to type in noise and then i'm going to add the noise texture we'll go over this later in a moment but now you can see that i have this noise texture and how you use the node wrangler add-on is you hold down the control and shift key at the same time so hold down the control and shift key and then just click on any node and what it does is it adds this little viewer node and then it plugs up through the viewer node and goes into the noise texture so what you can do is hold down the control and shift key and click on different nodes and then this
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principle would be sdf i'm gonna make it a red color so then i can control shift and click back on this one and this is the original blue one and now we're back to how it is but then if for some reason you want to go and just preview a specific part of your node setup you can hold down the control and shift key and click on it and then you can see what it looks like so you can you know play around with this maybe you want to change the scale the noise texture things like that you can see what it looks like but then when you want to go back and just preview the original thing hold down the control and shift key and click on it and it's going to go back to
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how it is so that is the main feature of the node wrangler there are a few other features that it has but that's the main one all right so when you add in a material onto an object you're gonna see this principled bsdf and so this is the shader of the object because if you didn't have this if i just delete it you can see that it's black because it doesn't have any data of what it actually is so what type of material is it is it like a glass material is it a glowing emission material is it like a water material or is it it's principled
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so on default all the materials have the principled bsdf for most things generally you're going to want to use the principled bsdf and we will go over the other shaders in a moment and then all of your nodes have to eventually be plugging up to the material output so for instance if you have a bunch of nodes over here and they're kind of plugging into the principle to give it more data so you know what's the color what's the normal if it's like has some bump different things like that by the end of it all the procedural nodes have to go into a material output and the material output is what tells it to go
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over here and actually be displayed on your object because if i just delete this if you don't have any material output it's not going to work so you have to have a material output so i'll just control z that you have to have a material output you can see if this is not plugged into the material output you can see that it's all black because it doesn't have any data to work with because you're not actually plugging anything into the material output so you're just going to take this plug it into the surface alright so let's get started with the different types of nodes so the first type of nodes that we're going to go over is the shader
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nodes so all these shader nodes have this green right here so you know it's a shader node if it has this little green tab right here so to add nodes you can click right over here on the ad and then there's a bunch of different categories and we're going to go to the shader one you can also click on the search so once you remember what all the nodes are called you can just click on the search and then you can type in things i use this a lot i usually just click on the search and type it in because i know what i'm looking for but if you still don't remember all the nodes you can go through here and look at all the
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different nodes now you can click on the add here but the shortcut key for this add menu is shift a so just like in object mode right here in the 3d view if you press shift a you can add objects so if you press shift a in the shader editor then you can add nodes so here's the search if you want to click on a search and you can type in things like the principled bsdf things like that i'm going to press shift a and then i'm going to go down here to shader so all of these nodes these are shader nodes and these are all going to have the green tab so because this is a beginner
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tutorial series i'm just going to go over the main ones so the first one that i want to show you is the omission so let me go here omission i can click on this and you can see when i add it it's going to follow my cursor and i can just click and drop it in and you can see that this node is green because it is a shader node so if i just click on this and drag it and drop it in you can see that now it's previewing that instead of this one so you can kind of think of the shader nodes as being the real life material so what is it actually made of is it made out of rock is it made out of
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metal is it made out of some glowing lava or something like that now the principle of bsdf is going to be most of them so you know rock dirt sand plastic metal things like that you're going to use the principled but then there are a few others like for instance if you maybe have a light bulb and you need to glow or maybe you're creating a sun object or some glowing lava you're going to use the emission because the emission actually emits light and you can see there are some different settings here so there's like the color one so you can change the color if you want to be like maybe some
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glowing lava you could make it orange and then you can also turn the strength up so right here the strength is set to one you can turn this up and make it brighter and brighter so now it's like super bright glowing lava or maybe this is a sun or something like that so that is the emission now i'm also going to talk about the principled bsdf so if i just drag this over here now you can see it's connected and we can see it so the principled bsdf is a node which you can make tons of different materials out of and the principled bsdf actually right down here has an emission so if you want
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to click on the emission you can see there's a color you can actually turn this up and it will actually emit light so this emission node is actually built into the principle the principle is basically the master node so it has almost all the materials you can make tons of materials with it but you could also just use like an emission shader if you wanted to and you can see there also is an emission strength so if you turn this up make this like an orangey color on the little color tab right here and then also there's the emission strength so if you turn that up it's almost like the same thing right here if i just make
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this a little bit stronger you can see it's almost the same thing i'm just going to click on the color right here and turn it down to black and then the emission strength i'll turn that to zero so you can click on the value and then you can actually type in numbers so if i click on this i can change it to zero and then hit enter you can also click on the little arrows here and that's going to change them so i can change it down to zero or you can also click and drag all right so let me just go over the main ones that you're going to be using so you can see there's this base color the base color is pretty self-explanatory you can just click on
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this color and drag it around and then also later in the video i'm going to talk about different nodes you can add and you can plug the nodes up to the base color so instead of it using one color you could for instance add a procedural texture and plug that in and then instead of it using a color it's going to instead use that procedural texture instead of the color so another common thing that you're going to use is this metallic value so this is pretty simple if you're making a material that is metal you're going to turn it all the way up to one and then if you're making
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a material that is not metal you're going to turn it all the way down to zero so you can see if i turn up to one you can see now it looks like a metal shiny ball and i could maybe make it gray so now you can see it's like metal and shiny or if you turn this all the way down this just kind of looks like maybe plastic or something like that or maybe clay and then if you have a material that has some parts metal and some parts not like for instance you might have a scratchy metal material and the scratches the rusty scratches may not be metal because they're kind of scratched and old and worn maybe they
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have dirt on them but then the rest of the material is metal you could use for instance a texture and you would plug the texture into the metallic value and then instead of using one or zero it would actually tell it where on the shader it's going to be metallic and where on the shader it's not going to be metallic so we'll get into that later but basically if you want to be all metallic you turn up to one if you want to be not metallic at all you turn it down to zero or if you just want some specific places to be metallic you'll use different things like procedural textures and things like that all right
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let's go down to the next common one which is the roughness so for instance think of like a mirror a mirror is super super shiny or maybe think of like some car paint that's going to be really really shiny so if you turn this down you can see it's going to be more and more shiny and more and more reflective and you can see if i turn the roughness all the way down it's going to be super super shiny but then if you think of another material like maybe brick or rock usually bricks or rocks they're super super rough and you can't really see any reflection so if you're making a material like brick or rock or something
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that is not reflective you're going to turn this way up and now you can see that's not reflective at all it's very rough so i'm just going to turn the roughness back to the default which is 0.5 so if i just click on it you can see i can change it so i can just type in 0.5 enter and there we go now it's right in the middle i'll just turn this back to a blue color so we're going to go all the way down and we're going to go right down here to the normal so the normal is basically a fake bump so for instance think of something like maybe rock a rock is going to be very bumpy but you
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can see that this object right here is actually very smooth so what you can do is you can use this normal to basically make a fake bump and this doesn't actually change the object's shape so it doesn't actually change the shape of the mesh what it does is it changes how the shader interacts with the light so when the light comes down and bounces off of the object it's going to change how that looks and so it basically adds a fake bump and it makes it look like it's bumpy even though it's actually not so it won't actually change the shape of the object or the shape of the mesh
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it'll just make a fake bump in the material and i'll be showing you how to use this later in the video alright so that is the principled bsdf now let's just go over a few more common ones i'm going to press shift a here and i can go to shader and i'm going to go right down here to the mix shader so if i click on the mix shader i can add this one in now what this does is it actually mixes two shaders together so you can see here is one shader and here is one shader and then the shader output so these are the inputs and here's the output so what i
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can do is i can actually put this in front of these and then i can plug this one into this so if i use the node wrangler feature by pressing ctrl shift and clicking on the node go into rendered mode you can see it's black because it doesn't actually have any shading data so what i can do is if i drag these over here kind of drag this down i can actually pull out a wire and drop it in here and then i can pull out a wire and drop it in here and you can see that now it's going to mix them both together so it's actually mixing the emission with the principle
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and then this factor here this is going to tell it how much it's going to be of each one so if you drag it all the way down to zero you can see now it's only using the emission but if i drag it all the way up to 1 it's only using the principle so it's basically just going in between these two so i can just drag it kind of like this and now you can see it does look like a blue ball but then it also is a little bit glowing so this is very useful if you want to mix some things together for instance if you have an object that you want to be maybe the principled but then just some specific areas you want to be in a mission you
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can add the emission and plug these two together and then it will mix them together so this is very useful if you want to mix two of them together and then earlier in the tutorial i talked about the shortcut keys and i talked about how you can click on this and you can press control x and that way it'll delete it but it'll keep it plugged up and then actually i just want to click on this and drag it and drop it in here and then i can just click on this and press x and delete it so let's go over another common one so again i'm going to press shift a here and i'm going to go down to shader and another very common
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one is the glass bsdf so i'm going to click on this drop it right here and then i can just plug it up so you can see it looks like a glass ball and this is really useful if you're making windows or if you're making like a glass cup really anything that's made out of glass this glass bsdf is super useful and you can see that just like all the other nodes there are some different settings so you can change the color so if you want to make some tinted glass you could change it so you can see now it's like red glass or blue glass or green glass or whatever you want to do and there's also a roughness value so if
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you want to make it look like frosted glass or some glass that you can't quite see all the way through you could turn up the roughness and you can see now that i've turned that roughness up you can see it is glass but it looks really rough sort of like a frosted glass or something like that so let me just click on this and then just press x to delete it let's add in the last common one i'm going to show you i'm going to press shift a here and i'm going to go right here to shader and i'm going to add the transparent so let's click on the transparent added in so this is basically just like what it sounds it basically is just transparent so if i
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just click on it and add it in you can see that it's invisible you can't see it at all but then if you click on the color you can change the color and you can see that now it is transparent but only slightly transparent so if it's white it's going to be fully transparent and then as you turn it down you'll be able to see more and more of it all right so those are all the most common nodes at least they're all the main ones that i use there are more ones you could definitely try these out all right so i'm just going to plug this back up alright so that is the first category that is the shader nodes all right so let's go on to the second category of
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nodes which are the texture nodes so if you press shift a you can see that right underneath it there is texture and these these are the really cool things so there's a bunch of different things here let me just go over the main ones that you're going to use so the most common one that you're going to be using is the noise texture so i'm just going to click on it and then drop it right here and then remember you can press ctrl and shift and click on the noise texture to preview it and when you add in noise texture you can see basically it just adds some noise and then there's also the scale so if you want to add more
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noise you can change that up and you can see there's going to be more noise there also is detail so as you turn this up there's going to be more and more detail in there there's also the roughness so if you turn the roughness way down you can see it's almost going to get more blobby and then if you turn the roughness way up it's going to have a lot more detail so you can see there it has lots of detail you can just zoom way in and then there's also distortion so if you just turn the distortion up you can see it's kind of getting distorted this almost looks like maybe water or something because it's a little bit distorted i'm just going to turn this back to zero now as i talked about
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earlier in the video you can take different textures and you can plug them up to the shaders so the shaders those are the actual real life materials so what is the material made out of is it brick is it marble is it glass or maybe it's rock or dirt or sand but then you can take the different texture nodes and you can plug them in to the shaders so for instance this noise texture if i just ctrl shift and click on it you can see that it doesn't have any shading so it doesn't have any reflectivity or anything like that it's not interacting with the light because i'm just previewing it with the viewer so let me
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just control shift and click back on this if i want the noise texture to be contributing to the color i can just click right here and take the factor and i can plug this into the base color and you can see now look at that we can now preview this noise texture as our color for the principal bsdf now if you control shift and click on this and then ctrl shift and click on it again you can see there is a color version of the noise texture and then there is a factor version so the factor version is just black and white and then if you control
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shift and click on this again there is the color version and the color version is just basically a bunch of random colors i usually use the factor but if you want to you could use the color it really just depends on what you're doing so if you want to use the color i'm just going to ctrl shift and click back on this you could drag the color and drop it into the base color and you can see now it's using the color now you may have noticed another thing and that is that these little dots here have different colors so the color one that is yellow and what that's telling you is that it's color data now all of the gray
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ones the gray ones are kind of just like all the mismatch and all the other ones so there's factors there's metallic things like that the gray ones are sort of just all the general other ones but then there is the yellow one the yellow ones the color one and you can see that there is also these purple ones so the purple ones are either normal data or they are vectors and we're going to be getting into vectors and normal later but you can just remember that the purple ones are either like normal or vectors and then the yellow ones are going to be color data and then the gray
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ones are going to be other things usually just black and white data and then you can also see that there are green ones right here and the green ones these are the shader data so the green ones are only going to be on the shaders and you can see that there is a green one going over to this green one because this needs shader data so this doesn't apply for everything but generally speaking you want to plug the same colors up to their own color now the gray ones the factors here the black and white data those ones you can usually plug them into anything like it's not
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gonna mess up anything if you plug a gray one like this into the yellow one like this i can control shift and click on this you can see that totally looks fine so the gray ones and the yellow ones can usually mix but for instance if you're taking something like this yellow one and you're plugging it into the purple one you can see something is clearly wrong here something is broken with the shader and that is because you don't want to mix the colors up generally speaking like for instance also i could duplicate this and maybe plug this green one into this yellow one and that's not gonna work you can see
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it's a red line and it's basically telling you that doesn't work you can't do that um so you're not supposed to do that and that'll just kind of mess things up so just remember that generally speaking the colors of the sockets need to go into each other all right so let's jump back over here to the different textures so that is the noise texture the noise texture is a very common one i'm just going to delete it and then i'll press shift a and let's go to the next common one so another very common one is the wave texture this is a really cool one so i can control shift and click on it and you can see basically it just has these waves here
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and there's a bunch of cool things you can do you can play around with these things like you can change it from bands to rings that looks a little bit different you can change the x y and z so if you're familiar with the 3d side of blender there's the x-axis y-axis and z-axis so if you change this it's going to change where the waves are rotated and then there also is a few other settings here like shine and saw that looks a little bit different and triangle so you can play around with these things i'm just going to leave it at sine and then just like the noise texture there's a scale so if you want to have more or less you can change that
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there also is a distortion so you can see as i turn this up it's going to be more and more distorted and just like the noise texture there's a detail so it's just going to add random bits of detail so that is super useful and then there is some other ones you can play around with these like the detail roughness you can see there's going to be even more detail and it's very rough so i'm just going to delete this one let's just press shift a and go to texture so another really common one this is a very cool one is the veroni texture if that's how you pronounce it veroni i think that's how you pronounce it so let me just control shift and
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click on this one so you can see that again they have different outputs there's a distance and then if i ctrl shift and click on it again it's going to go down to color so here's some color data and then i can control shift and click on it again and here is a position one i'm just going to control shift and click on it again and that'll go back to the distance so this one is really cool there actually are a bunch of different settings here and another really cool thing you can do is if you want to quickly switch between these you can hover your mouse over the drop down and then you can hold down the control key
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and then you can scroll with your scroll wheel so you can see as i scroll with my scroll wheel holding down the control key it's going to just cycle between them so usually for most things again 3d is the most common one and there are also some other cool things here and these all look different so there's f2 you can see that looks pretty cool there's smooth f1 so that's kind of like smooth there's distance to edge this is really cool if you're making like some cracked shader or something like that so you can play around with these pretty cool settings you can change and then there also is the scale so you can
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change this one most of the procedural textures have scales so that is super useful so you can like turn the scale down and then there is the randomness so if you turn the randomness all the way down you can see now these are all aligned and then as you turn the randomness up you can see that now they're all random so that's super useful you could use that for many things all right so that's the verona texture i'm just going to delete this now and let's press shift a again and we'll go to the next one so another really cool one is the checker texture so i'm just going to add this in control shift and click on it and you can see
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it's basically just a checker look so there's color one and color two so you can change the different colors so for instance if you want to make like a checker board you could make the color one it'd be like a red color and then color two could be black and now it looks kind of like the board from the checkers game uh you could also if you want to make like a chess board maybe like a wooden chessboard you could have one of them be brown like this and then you could have another one maybe be like a darker brown something like that so now maybe that's made out of wood and then there also is a scale as well so that has the checker texture let me just
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delete this one i'm gonna press shift a i also want to show you another really cool one which is a brick texture so this is very cool for making bricks so i can just control shift and click on this so if you want to make bricks or tiles or things like that this is really useful now you can see that it places it a little bit weirdly later in the video we're going to be getting into how you can actually change where the texture is and we're going to be using the vector for that so there are actually nodes where you can tell it where you want to be so you can see that right over here
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it's not stretched if you wanted to move this down here you could actually use nodes and tell it where it's going to be placed so for now i'm just going to look at it from the top view so there's the offset now you can see that kind of just looks like the checker texture i'm just going to turn the offset all the way up to one there's some other things here you can play around with there's also the colors so if you want to have it maybe be like kind of a reddish brick wall there are some brick walls that are kind of more of a red color and then there is the mortar and the mortar is like in between so you could make it out maybe like a gray color or a brown color
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and then there's some other cool things here you can play around with like the mortar size how smooth it is you can also change the brick width and the brick height or the row height different things like that so this is a super useful texture i have a tutorial on how to create procedural tiles um so if you want to watch that link's in the description it's also in my playlist and i use the brick texture to create it i'm just going to delete this now let's go over another one just a couple more though that i'm going to show you there is a musgrave texture this is a really
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cool one you can do some really cool things with this so you can see this kind of looks like the noise texture but you can do some different things with it like play around with the scale you can also change the detail here again this is very common the detail i can also click right up here and change these things and you can see they all look different but that looks pretty cool so there's many uses for the musgrave texture as well all right i'm just going to delete this one and then one more that i'm going to show you in this video if i press shift a go to texture you can see there is this magic texture so this is a pretty cool one i'm going to ctrl
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shift and click on this this one looks very cool it's very colorful and this is almost like a seed value it's kind of just random and it'll just give you random colors that's pretty cool so i don't use this one very much but it is a pretty cool one so i just wanted to show you it there's a scale value you can also change the distortion oh that looks really cool so yeah this is a cool one i don't use it very much but i just wanted to show you it so i'll press x to delete it and i'll just press shift a and i'm going to you can click on the search if you want to find a specific one i'm going to search for the noise texture so
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i can click on search type in noise and then i can find it and just drop it in here and then i'm going to take the factor and plug that up to the base color and then i just need to control and shift and click on the principle to preview it maybe change the scale just turn it up and i think i'll turn the detail up all the way up to 16 so it's detailed alright so that is the second type of procedural nodes the texture nodes and i don't think i said this earlier but you probably figured it out all of the texture nodes have orange so they have this orangey-brown color and
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that way you can know that they are texture nodes so just like all the shader nodes have green these all have orange alright so let's go to the third type of textures which is the input textures so if you press shift day you can see right up here there is input and there are a bunch of different ones here again i'll just go over the main ones that you're going to use so the main one that you're going to be using is the texture coordinate node so if i click on this i can just drop it right down here and you may notice two things you might
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have noticed that these are all purple and so these are all going to deal with the vectors and you also might have noticed that these are red so all of the inputs they're all going to be red as you can see here these are all red so that's a good way to remember that all the input nodes are red now the main thing that the input nodes do is they tell the textures where they're going to be placed on the object so they're going to define how the texture is placed and where it's placed so that's what the
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vector deals with so just to show you i can go back into rendered mode right here now this noise texture needs some default vector it needs some way to know how it's going to be placed on the object so each texture if it doesn't have a texture coordinate plugging into it or anything in the vector plugging into it then it needs a default vector and so the default vector is generated so you can see if i take the generated and plug it into the vector then nothing is going to change you can see here it is before and here it is after so if you don't have anything plugged into it it's
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just going to use this generated now i can control shift and click on this and i can continue to click and i can go down and down and there's a bunch of different ones here there's normal uv object camera window and reflection and these things tell the texture how it's going to be placed on the object so i can just control shift and click back on this so the generated that's the default so if i just plug this in to the vector so purple's going to purple that's going to stay the same if i change it to a normal now it looks a little bit different because what it's doing is it's using the normal of the object if
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you plug in the uv it's going to use the uv map of the object so you can see now you can see it's kind of stretched and that's because if i tap in edit mode and i go u and unwrap you can see it unwraps it i can do like the smart uv project and now you can see it's going to act differently but you can see there's some seams and that's because now it's using the uv map so if you're familiar at all with uv unwrapping and texturing that's basically what it's using so it's using the uv map of the object if you go into the uv editing tab you can see here is the uv map and you can do some different uv maps like you could press u and do
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the cube projection that would be a little bit different and then i'll just go back to the shading tab and you can see that now it looks a little bit different so that is the uv so depending on how the uv mapping is it's going to change like here's the sphere projection that looks a little bit different it's a bit stretched let's go on to the next one which is the object so this one is super useful and for most procedural setups you're going to be using the object one and why the object one is so great for procedural texturing is because it very evenly places the texture all around and you're not really
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going to have any stretching or anything like that unless of course you stretch the object if you stretch the object of course then it's going to be stretched although if you pressed control a and then you applied the scale now you can see it's not going to be stretched and the texture looks fine i'm just going to ctrl z that though so the object mapping works really well and it applies pretty much to any mesh so for instance if i press shift a and maybe i add a cube then i can like bevel this you don't need to follow me on this but now if i want to take this and select the cube i
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can just add the procedural material you can see it actually works pretty well on different objects because it's using the object mapping and it just very nicely places the texture very evenly around the object so the object mapping works really well there also is some others like the camera so if you plug this into the camera one so if i just go into the material preview now you can see that that's what's happening so it applies the texture to where the camera is located so depending on where the camera is located it's going to change i don't use this for very many things but you
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may use it in some cases there's also a window so if you change it to window now you can see that as i'm rotating it's not changing where the texture is and there also is the reflection one and that one is a little bit different as well you can see it kind of reacts to the reflection so where the object would be more reflective kind of on the sides here you can see it looks a bit different now this is a beginner tutorial so you really don't need to memorize these don't worry about any of these all you need to remember mainly is the object one and that's really good for procedural textures or if for some
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reason you want to use the uv map you could or generated but really for most procedural textures you're going to use objects so so for almost all of my procedural material tutorials i just use object because that works really well so let's go over the other ones so let's press shift a here i'm just going to go to input another common one is the geometry one so we can add the geometry one and you can see this has even more stuff so let me just plug these different inputs in and then we can see how it changes so there's position and you can see this is going to change when
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the position of the object changes so that is pretty cool so if for some reason you want to change when the position changes you could do that there's also normal as well on the geometry node there's also normal right here and there are some other ones you could try these different ones out if you want to but there's one really cool one which is the pointiness and what the pointing is value does is it makes the parts of the mesh that are coming out lighter and then the crevices and creases of the mesh it makes that darker now i actually have a tutorial on how to use the pointiness value i'll leave a link in the description and a card right
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up there on the screen but let me just show you what you might use it for so i'm just going to add like a monkey and then i'll maybe bring this up you don't need to follow me on this if you don't want to and then i'm just going to add that procedural material now if you're in ev this unfortunately isn't going to work because the point is value doesn't work in eevee it only works in the cycles render engine but you can see here if you zoom in it's already starting to do something so i'm just going to control shift and click until i can preview it but you can see that the crevices are a bit darker and then the corners or the parts that are kind of up higher it's making that lighter now i'm
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not going to go into a ton of detail but you can definitely watch that tutorial on how to use blender's pointiness value link is in the description but there's just an example of what it looks like so i will just delete this and then we can just bring this back down and then i'll also delete the geometry node alright let's press shift a and i'm going to go to input and the next one that i want to show you is the value so this is basically just a number value so for instance if you wanted to change two values at the same time what you could do is for instance this value here you
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could plug it into the scale and you can see it's gray and it's going into gray and this doesn't have any texture data or anything like that it is just an input because it's red and so it's going from here into here so it's now a new input and now instead of it using this scale it's going to use the scale of the value node so if you want to change the scale and the detail at the same time you could plug these both up and now if i just ctrl shift and click on the noise texture i can scale this value and it's going to change the value for both the
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scale and the detail because again instead of it using their own scale and their own detail i'm plugging these up and so now it's only using this value instead so this is very useful for a lot of things if you want to animate values this is really useful and also if you want to change multiple values at the same time this is very useful so i'm just going to delete that now let's press shift a and i'll go back to the input and there's another cool one i want to show you the layer weight node so i'm just going to click on this and add it in now you can see that unlike this one this one actually does have
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some inputs so you can actually input stuff into the layer weight and then output it so for instance if you want to take the object plug that into the normal then you could plug these into the noise texture so let me just ctrl shift and click on it so you can see what it's doing so basically what the layer weight node does is it makes the parts on the edges here when you are looking at the object more from a side view like when you're looking at the faces from side view it makes that lighter and then the faces that you are looking on more straight forward that's going to be a grayer color so there's
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the fresnel and then you can also control shift and click on this and there's the facing and then there is a blend value that you can change that so you can make it lighter or darker so if you want to make it more contrasty you can do that so how might this be useful well it might be useful for instance on like an atmosphere on a planet this would be very useful because maybe if you're making a procedural planet i actually have a tutorial on how to create a procedural planet you might want to have an atmosphere and just have like some blue on the edges so you could use this and then you would of course need to change it so you need to edit
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the colors to make it kind of blue and then you could maybe plug that through an emission so that it's a glowing atmosphere that's just an example you could definitely watch my procedural planet tutorial link will be in the description so that is the layer weight node i'm just going to delete this now and again there are a bunch of them but i'm just going to show you one more common one so the last one that i want to show you is the object info node so let's just add this in and just put it down here so this is a pretty cool one especially the random value this is really cool so if i take the random i
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can plug the random into the base color so it looks a little bit complicated here let me just control shift and click on the principle so let me just move these out of the way so i just want to plug the random into the base color i don't need to go into this one so i'm just going to plug the random into the base color and then what i can do let me just scale this down move it over the side if i press shift d to duplicate this you can see that they're actually different colors so this one's a little bit lighter this one is a bit darker i can press shifty again oh it's a lighter one and there's another one i'll press
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shift d you can see that one's very light so basically this has a random value and what it does is it makes each object that has the material a random color slightly different now right now it is only black and white it's kind of just like white and gray but you can actually play around with this by adding nodes in here to edit the colors so all we need is this white and black value and we can edit the colors and we could just make like different colors and this is going to lead me into the next group of nodes which is the converter nodes so i'm just going to press shift a and you
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can see right down here there is converter now there's a bunch of different things here i'm just going to show you the most common ones so there is this color ramp let's click on this and then you can see that if i just drag over this wire turns a white color and i can just drop it and you can see that it's automatically going to connect it up so now i can control shift and click on this color ramp now you also may have noticed that this is another color it is blue so when i press shift a i go to converter you can see that all of the converter nodes are blue so that is very
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helpful i'm just going to delete these so with the color ramp if i control shift and click on that you can see that here is what we're seeing so this is the random value and the color amp right now it's not really doing anything if we had color data it would convert it to black and white because it's a converter node but what i can do is i can actually change the colors in between this value so we can take the random value we can convert it through the color ramp node the coloramp node is a converter node and then we can change the colors and then that can go into the base color so you can see that the color ramp node has
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a black tab and a white tab and you can actually drag these tabs around you can also click on the plus here if you want to add a new tab in between and you can also click on the minus if you want to delete it now each tab has a color that you can change so you can see right here there is this color and if you click on this then it will give you this color palette and you can change the color so i can just change this to for instance like a green color and then i can also drag this and you can see that when i drag these two together it's going to be more and more contrasty because you can think of this random as being all of
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these different objects they're going to randomly be dropped in here and so if these are closer and closer together there's a more likely chance that they're going to be green or white and not in between so it's going to make it more and more contrasty if you drag them together if you drag them out if you drag them really far apart there's a lot more of a fade in between the green and the white and so you can see some of them are sort of like a light green so this one i can also change so if i click on the white tab i can click right here to change the color so maybe this one i want to make it blue and now you can see
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it's blending between green and blue i can also click on the plus here to add a new one and so this one i could make another color maybe like red and you can see that now we have a bunch of different colors because if you're mixing red and green there's going to be yellow and orange in between and now if i just start to duplicate these you can see that randomly they're going to be generated as different colors now if i take away or remove the random then that's not going to happen you can see that it's just going to be whichever one is in the middle so if i turn this to green now it's going to be green or i can just drag the blue over now it's
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going to be blue so you need that random data because this is an input node the input node is going into the color ramp and then the color ramp is converting it to these different colors and then that's going to go right through here to the base color so i can just control shift and click on that and you can see that now we have a bunch of different colored balls and when i press shift d to duplicate them they're all different colors so that is the color ramp node it's very cool and it's a very common node so let's press shift a i'm going to go down here to converter and another
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common one a very useful one is rgb to black and white so if i click on this i can just drop it in and then i want to drop it like right in here because you can see yellow going to yellow and then the gray that's fine if it goes in there because this is color so it's yellow and then the gray one that is just black and white so it's converting it from color to just black and white so i can just drop it in here and then if i control shift and click on this you can see it's color and then if i control shift and click on this you can see now it's just black and white so that's a super useful one i'm just going to press x to delete
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that if i press shift a and go to converter there also is another common one and it's the math node so i'm just going to drop the math node right here so the math node is sort of like a calculator it basically does math for us so it's super useful in many cases let me just give you an example so i'm just going to move these three nodes out of the way and then i'm just going to take the noise texture and bring it over here then i'm going to take the factor and i'm going to plug that into the first value so i can now control shift and click on this and you can see here's the
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noise texture going into the first value and then if you click right here there's a bunch of different things you can tell the math node to do so the main ones that you're probably going to use are add subtract multiply and divide so let's say that i want to add a value from a texture into another texture so i'm going to press shift a and i'm going to go to texture and i'm just going to add the checkered texture i'm just going to drop it down here and then what i want to do is make this one the top one fully white and then the black one fully dark so i'm just going to ctrl shift and
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click on the checker texture so for instance let's say that i only want to show the noise texture where the black part is on the checker texture so i only want to add the noise texture to the black parts of the checker texture what i can do is i can take the factor plug that into the bottom one and then the factor of this one i can plug it into the top one so instead of using these number values we're actually using the data from these textures if i control shift and click on this now you can see because this is set to add the math node
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is going to add the noise texture wherever the checker texture is black so you can see right here is the noise texture here's the checker texture it's black right here if i ctrl shift click on this you can see it's only adding the noise texture where it's black and then where it's white it's just staying the same and then you can change this so for instance you could change it to subtract instead and now you can see that the white squares are going to be black instead of white and then there are of course a bunch of ones here i'm not going to go into all of them but you can see how that could be used and then this value could be plugged into the base
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color and now you have that so that is the math node super useful i'm just going to click on this and press x to delete it and click on this one and press x to delete it and i'll just move these a bit back into place i'm also just going to select all the extra balls and i will just delete them because all we need is this one so let me just scale this up and put it back into place alright so that's the basics of these blue converter nodes i'm just going to delete the color ramp and i'm going to delete the object info and then let me just set up this basic setup so i'm just going to set the object to the vector
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and then i'm going to set the factor to the base color so now we can just preview the noise texture so for instance what if we want to scale or transform this noise texture well this leads me into my next group of nodes which are the vector nodes so if you press shift a you can go right down here to vector and you can see that there are some different vector nodes what i'm going to do is add a very common one which is the mapping node and then i'm just going to drop this down here so this mapping node is going to allow you to change the location rotation or scale
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of whatever it's plugging through so we want to use the object so the object is going through the vector and then that vector is going into the noise texture so the vector is going to tell it where the noise texture is going to be placed on the object so for instance there's location so we could change the x location let me just go into the material preview so you can see this a little bit better so you can change the x location you can see now it's kind of moving along there we could change the y one that's going back and forth or the z one you can see now it's moving up and down there's also the rotation so you can see that now i'm rotating it and it looks like i'm rotating the sphere but
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actually i'm just rotating the texture on the sphere so that's super cool if for some reason you just want to change where it is you could do that and then there's also scale so you could kind of squish it down you could change the y one that's going back and forth or the z one you could squish it down if you wanted to so the mapping node is going to change how the noise texture is placed on the object let's press shift a and i want to show you one more there are quite a few here but the second most common one that you're probably going to be using is the bump so let's just add the bump in so the bump is a little
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different it doesn't quite work like back here behind the noise texture what the bump node does is it actually converts the input so if you input something it's going to convert that to normal data so you can see there is a gray height one right here and there also is some other ones but the height one here is what we're going to be using in this video so there's a height one going in here and then it converts it and it comes out as purple which is the normal data you can see it says normal so if you're watching in the earlier part of this video i was talking about how you don't want to mix these like for
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instance this factor the gray one you don't want to mix that with purple because there are some shading issues well if you take the bump node and plug it in here and then what you want to do because you don't want to mix these you don't want to mix gray and purple so you want to take the gray one plug that into the height and then unplug this you can now see that it's actually converting that to normal data so it's basically now acting like a normal texture map if you've downloaded a texture pack if you've downloaded some textures you may have seen that there's like a normal one
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and if you plug that through this is adding that fake bump that i talked about earlier in the video and that way we can use the data from the noise texture and actually plug it into the normal because normally without this if you just plug the gray into the purple that wouldn't work it wouldn't work because you can see now there's all that shading issue so this converts it from the gray values so this black and white it converts it to normal data if you plug it into the height and then the purple can go to the purple and this is really great for creating procedural
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rocks so if you want to create a procedural rock shader this works really well i have a tutorial on how to create that link will be in the description so these two ones are the main vector nodes that you're probably going to be using the mapping and the bump at least these are the main ones that i use alright so now let's talk about the last big category of nodes if i press shift a they are the color nodes so the color nodes is going to allow you to add colors and edit colors in your procedural setup so there's a bunch of really cool ones here and these are
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really easy to use let's just go over the main ones so the rgb curves is the main one that i use so let's click on it and we can just for instance drop it right here and you will notice that once again it has a color so all of the color nodes are yellow and that actually makes a lot of sense because the outputs and inputs are also yellow and these ones are colors so all of these color nodes are yellow so you can see these ones are all yellow so that is very useful i'm just going to delete these so let me just show you the rgb curves so if i
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just ctrl shift and click on this you can see what it looks like now this is just gray and so there actually isn't any color so i just want to take this color right here and instead plug it into the color and that way we're actually using the color of the noise texture instead of just the factor there's the c1 there's the r and the g and the b so the c1 this is going to change how bright or dark it is so you can see if i click and drag it's going to add the dot and then the dot is going to move the curve and the curve will edit the colors so if i drag it down
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more over to this corner it's going to be darker and if i drag it up over to this corner it's going to be a lighter and you can also click and drag and make more dots so if you want to make it more contrasty or something you could like make it dark here and like pull this up you can see that's that's almost like a tie-dye look that's actually really cool and then if you want to delete these you could just click on them and then you can click on the x here to delete it so the c changes the brightness or the darkness let's go to the next one actually i'm going to make this a little bit brighter and then let's go to the next one which is the red values so r is
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for red g is for green and then b is for blue so on the red values if i drag it more towards here or more down here it's going to make the reds stronger or make them less strong it's going to add more red or remove more red so i can just drag this up you can see now it has a lot more red i can click on the g1 for green i can drag this up if i want more green or maybe i want less green so now it's kind of more purplish and then if i click on the b that is for blue i could drag it up more if i want more blue and you can see now it's more like a pink because red and blue together make like
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a pinkish purplish and if i want to remove the blue i could just remove a bunch of it and now it almost looks like lava colors because the blue is almost gone there's almost no blue so that is very useful i use the rgb curves node all the time let me just show you some other common ones so i'll just press x to delete this and then i'll press shift a let's go to color there also is the brightness and contrast this is super useful so i can take the color plug it into the color and then the color into the base color so we can actually preview it or you could just ctrl shift
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and click on the brightness and contrast so this is pretty self-explanatory the brightness is going to make it brighter and the contrast is going to make it more contrasty so there we go very cool this time i'm going to press ctrl x and ctrl x will delete the node but keep it plugged up let's just press shift a again and let's go to color the next one i'm going to add is the mix rgb so we're going to add this in so this one sort of works like the math note it's similar because you can see it has these different things here and there are some other things here like color dodge and
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screen and overlay things like that so what this will allow you to do is is it will allow you to mix different colors together in different ways so there's color one there's color two and then there's a factor so if i just take color two and i make it maybe like a bright red color now if i control shift and click on this you can see that as i change these if i change it all the way to zero it's only going to use the noise texture but if i change it all the way up to one it's only gonna use color two so color one and color two and then right now it's set to mix that's gonna
59:34
be evenly mixing them together but you could also change it to different things like darken or lighten and you can also add values into the factor so for instance what i could do is i could take this factor and plug it into the factor so instead of using just an even value back and forth we're actually going to use the factor of the noise texture so we're going to use this data to tell it to make it color 1 or color 2. so i just need to change this back to mix because mix is just the default and then if i control shift and click on this you can
01:00:04
see that it's kind of just gray it isn't very strongly white or strongly black so what i could do is i could press shift a and i could search for the brightness and contrast now i can drop the brightness and contrast right in here so what i want to do sorry this is getting a little bit complex is the factor needs to go to the color and then the color needs to go to the factor so what we're doing is we're using this as our factor to tell it where it's going to be color 1 and where it's going to be color 2. so i can just turn up the brightness just like a little bit and then i can turn
01:00:35
the contrast way up so it's very strong so you can see now the brightness and contrast has made that very bright and contrasty so now instead of using the factor number instead of just evenly blending in between them plugging the brightness and contrast into the factor is going to tell it where it's going to be color 2 which is red and where it's going to be color one which is this and to make this even simpler i could unplug this and then just change this to maybe like a blue color now you can see that it's using this data to tell it where it's going to be color one and where
01:01:05
it's going to be color to so that is super helpful the mix node very useful i'm just going to delete this and delete this one as well so i'll go over here to color you can of course try these all out but i'm going to show you another common one which is the invert node so i'm just going to drop this in here so it's really basic it literally just inverts whatever data you give it so if i take this factor plug it into the color here then i can control shift and click on this you can see if i control shift and click on this here it is before and then i can control shift and click on this and it inverts it so this
01:01:37
part here you can see there's a little white patch it inverts it and now it's going to be a bit of a dark patch so pretty simple it just inverts whatever value you give it all right so we're getting towards the end of the video but there's just a few more things that i want to show you and these are ways that you can better organize your nodes so if i just press shift a right here you can see that right down here there is a layout and there is this reroute so if you add the reroute we talked about this in the beginning of the video but if you hold down the shift key and right click and drag you can add these reroutes so
01:02:07
for instance if you didn't like how this is kind of going over maybe you want to go down and then over you could hold down the shift key and right click and drag over and then you could just like drag this down maybe like that maybe add another reroute move it up here and then you could like pull this down and you can see that now it looks a lot nicer so if you like this better you could do that this is really just personal preference though because this reroute is just a duplicate of whatever this output is so the output just continues to go down here and then it just goes in there so you could hold down the shift
01:02:38
key and then right click and drag to add the reroute you could also just press shift a and then go to layout and add a reroute and it's going to add that little dot there now you can also see under a layout there is this frame and the frames are super useful if you add them in basically you can add frames to different groups of nodes so for instance if you wanted to add all these to a frame you could then move them around and they'd all be connected in the frame so i can drag this and bring it over and then i can just click and drag and drop it into the frame and you can see now when i drag the frame the
01:03:09
nodes in the frame are gonna move along with it so i can box select these and drop them both in the frame drop it in and then if i drag this over you can see now i can move the frame so once you get really really complex procedural setups like for instance in my procedural planet tutorial that was a pretty complex node setup the most complex one i've ever done it's really complex and so i use these frames to help me organize the nodes you could also just delete this frame and if i just select all of these nodes you can press ctrl j
01:03:40
and that's going to add a frame so just like in the 3d side of blender if you want to join objects together you press ctrl j well it's the same here you can just like box select these press ctrl j and now it's going to add these all in and then if you want to delete the frame you can just click on it and press x to delete it and it won't actually delete the nodes inside the frame unless you have the node selected as well if you have the nodes and the frame selected and press x to delete it'll delete all of them or you can just press x on the frame and delete the frame now the frames can be used to organize the nodes
01:04:10
so you can actually name the frame so if you press n that's going to open up this side panel and you can see that there is a name and a label when you select the frame so for instance i could just call this noise hit enter and then the label you also need to change that so noise and you can see now it actually says noise right there there also is a color right here so if you turn on the color you could actually change it so if you want to be like blue that's pretty cool all right i'm just going to delete the frame so using frames is a super easy and effective way to organize your nodes now there's just one more way that
01:04:41
i want to show you on how to organize your nodes what you can do is you can actually join nodes together and then create a node out of those nodes so how you do this is you can just select the nodes so for instance i'm just going to select these two and then you can press ctrl g now when you press ctrl g it's going to add these into their own nodes so you're sort of like creating your own node it's pretty cool you can basically create your own node now when you do this it automatically plugs up these group inputs and the group outputs so
01:05:12
what you do now to get out of this is you press tab so if you press tab with this selected it's going to go inside the node and then if you press tab again that's going to go outside of the node so you can actually create your own nodes so it's really cool now if you press n you can also rename this so i can call this maybe noise and then the label is going to be noise and then there also is this node group here i could also call this one noise so that is super cool and then just like edit mode if you press tab you're going to go into edit mode if you tab into this
01:05:43
you're basically going to go into an edit mode of the node so it's pretty cool and then you can see here's the mapping and the noise texture and then the object is being plugged into the vector now let's say that i wanted to plug this into the color so maybe i just take the factor and i plug that into the base color but you can see if i control shift and click on it it's only the black and white in this case i actually want to plug the color value right here this color value into the principle i'm not actually able to access this color right here so what you can do is if i
01:06:14
tab right here what you can actually do is you can actually plug the inputs and the outputs into these empty sockets right here and then when you tab back into object mode or go back out here to the node it'll actually be right here so let me just show you so for instance i could just take this one plug it into here and then it's going to add another one plug this one to here it's going to add an extra one and plug this one to here so these ones are all the inputs so if i tab back into object mode you can see that now this noise node that we
01:06:44
created actually has a location rotation and scale in this case i don't really want them so i'm just going to unplug them so let me just unplug all of these and then you can see that for some reason it still keeps it even though i unplugged it so what you're going to have to do if you want to get rid of that is just tab into the node and then click on the node input and then you're going to have to click right over here on a group and you can see that there's the vector location rotation scale you just need to click on this and then press minus and then press minus and then press minus and it'll get rid of that so that is really cool and
01:07:15
you can also do that for the outputs so if you want certain outputs of the custom node that you created you can take the color and plug that in here and you can also do whatever you want so if you have more outputs you can plug them up and then if you tab out of the node you can see that now it has a color so if i control shift and click on this there we go there is the color data that we're looking for and i can just take the color plug it into the base color and now you can see that it has that color right there let me just turn down the strength of the bump so that you can see that so now you can see that we
01:07:46
actually have our own custom made node and with that said this is going to wrap it up for my beginner tutorial on how to use procedural nodes in blender now i would highly recommend checking out the playlist where i have a bunch of different procedural material tutorials so if you want to check out that playlist you can watch some different procedural material tutorials and all of those tutorials are created for beginners so they're all in real time and step by step and i add each node and i explain why i'm using them so watching those tutorials is a great next step to learning procedural nodes in blender so
01:08:18
again you can check out the playlist with the link in the description and also if you'd like to help support this channel a great way to do that is by purchasing my procedural material packs so i'll be creating more procedural material packs as i make more but for the time being i have two procedural material packs and each one has 10 procedural materials created with blender and you can purchase those on my gumroad store as well as some other 3d model sites and also if you join my patreon then you can get those over there so if you join my patreon you'll
01:08:49
be getting those procedural materials and you'll also help to support the channel each month so that's gonna be it for this tutorial thank you so much for watching and i hope the tutorial was helpful and i hope to see you in a future video

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