LUC LOUIS DE LAIRESSE DANCE AND MEDICI MEMENTO

LUC LOUIS DE LAIRESSE DANCE AND MEDICI MEMENTO

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00:08
[Music] [Applause] [Music] i'm carrie cassidy from project camelot i'm here today with luke delares and uh luke welcome to the show uh luke is a fabulous author and most fabulous uh ballet dancer and
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ballet mass master i think you would call yourself at this point luke uh but luke is also an old friend of mine so it's it's kind of a riot having him on my show now so uh welcome luke thank you for having me yes okay great uh so just wanted to uh sort of make sure everything is working here we are broadcasting live on facebook and then this will go on to my new youtube channel as well as my
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website so that's what's happening lately with camelot well what i want to do is start off with your bio and you have a fascinating background so tell us about everything and uh i don't know you can even start at the beginning you can start uh you know when you you were sort of discovered as a young ballet dancer and uh and your your interactions with nuriev of all people right so i'm going to put his picture on here as well so don't worry i'm going to
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be showing pictures while you talk so go ahead yeah sure time flew by 50 years ago um in my hometown ghent at the flanders festival the very celebrated company by maurice beijard who's a french choreographer who directed the valley of the 20th century and did a valley for nureyev who was then the you know the biggest star of all time basically and they landed in my hometown ghent and the opening night i went to the reception with a friend and we just
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stood in line for an autograph and he literally looked at me and said who are you and i was rather shocked unless and nothing came but mr noria if i just want to dance and he said good sit down i need some food so i ended up that i had to bring him and a few dancers to a um a little restaurant very few were still open at that time and uh and you have to know this is again this is not even brussels so the next day he introduced me to
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maurice bejar and they all thought that i should be dancing since that's what i wanted and a month later i was in class at the royal conservatory in brussels and two months after that i was on stage so it was extremely strange it went very quickly i gave it no thought it was something i felt was in my guts but you know i didn't dare getting out of the house so to say and um [Music] rudolph thanks to him i got a scholarship at the
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monte carlo school that was founded by princess grace of monaco formerly grace kelly of course and um and that was followed by me joining the paris opera valley at an unexpected audition uh when they needed men and so i landed up on stage of you know basically the oldest ballet company in the world and um uh and the picture i just discovered this morning that i have to send you is from a film that was made there for the paris opera valley with nureyev in the petrushka and i was one
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of the of the cadets that were two cadets so that was just funny like little big head behind three nurses so um but it was a it's a wonderful time rudolph could be extremely impossible you know he was a real big star in the in the sense of sometimes divas can be impossible and but it was a fun time he was very friendly with everybody in the quarterback which mostly he was
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and of course he was also um not just the biggest ballet star beside maybe late when barishnikov came um nurif was like the mick jagger of the bali world and because i was in his entourage all of a sudden like i do not know why this happened just that i wanted to dance he brought me he presented me um and because of him the doors went open and at that particular point my teacher from
05:00
the paris opera valley had actually witnessed this and said well you know the company thinks you're his new boyfriend and i was so shocked because i'm i was like oh well no and you know rudolph was exceptionally kind to me um which had i probably been a boyfriend i would not have lost it you know so we had a what i call a light friendship because wherever i would show up and he got me the scholarship in monte carlo and i was invited at dinners and because of him i met people
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which meant as an observer i started to encounter um very very famous people who um ended up at the end being a little scary you know so i sat at the table in the houses of major families in the artist world or the the fashion world like the roshast family or i met klaus kinski and his very beautiful very young daughter natasha we were at a dinner a private dinner and that dinner went into a completely different direction so i
06:02
sneaked out of the house you know and so from one thing came to the other and my my fascination grew as to why the world on stage became alive in the dark hours and i never thought of this because it all seemed like a movie yeah so and this what many years later propelled me to to want to write to do you know a lot of other things but as a career in dance i was on stage about 10 years it is not
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something i would recommend for a body to start late it's a beautiful art of course we do the most incredible things with our body and we jump all over on heart or semi heart floors which is not to be recommended for any tendons knees or any you know but um with this comes the yoga possibility and the gyrotonic and all the healing which means is you do an entire you take a whole new path which then takes you to a healing part if you
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should choose that and um and this is one of the reasons why i stayed in dance uh until now and i do enjoy teaching i've been doing that for over 45 years and so i try to teach also what not to do and how to be as close as you want to be to your authentic self which is what my big fascination is about life not i think the illusion is very easy to create um not to be absorbed by it is you know a huge
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huge trip okay so uh what i want you to do though is is talk a little bit about the the darker side of the dance world uh and in terms of it really you know maybe a lot like hollywood uh so if you could go into that a bit yes of course um i would say that to start off to become a dancer um because i was 18
08:07
with maybe a very light physique of a 16 year old and by the way do you have any pictures of yourself as a dancer that you could show us oh you can share your desktop but you should have thought of that but if you can't we can do it later but yes they're um they're on my facebook but they are okay well um i'll look you up go ahead and talk and i'll look you up well um well i mean when you're very young it's ideal to start dancing depending the physique especially for young girls that grow up much quicker as young
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teenagers but the age 1011 for boys 11 12 again the size you know of the body always depends upon the parents usually so eventually um the training is a minimal of five to six days a week at four to five hours a day um especially when you start to be thirteen fourteen and you're always working your body now the great schools uh usually do have um extra curriculum work uh on the music the dance history uh
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art in general which is so important uh when you're going to be developed as a dancer but then um within this in incredible realm of the unexpected magical uh uh stage uh experiences um like you say there is of course the darkest side because the darker side exists everywhere and um one of my experiences and i will not immediately call big opera houses because
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i fear that most of them have some kind of uh very alive dark side always prevalent but it comes in the united states for example to the fact that the national endowment from the arts is very light as into bringing the money in for the companies like for the opera the ballet needs the private sponsoring with private sponsoring come a lot of um you know special gifts you know and and i fear that many of the very young dancers um
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are are being groomed for more private outings than their own dance education and eventually a professional career i saw it personally in the beginning of my career i was invited by somebody who's named my real name because he passed away bernard lefor became the paris opera director um he was the director of a very famous opera festival called festival exin exxon provence in the province provost in south of france and i i happen to
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have been chosen to do a leading role in in about an opera valley that originally was done for ruby the 14th so i performed this and after the opening night it took my luck it was a very big success and i was immediately invited everywhere and um uh the personal manager of naraya took me to parties and i met in in paris i met london bernstein well bernstein didn't wait to invite me to his private party after his concert at the chat of the chancellor
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and when i walked in there were only men now to me it didn't matter what i would be gay or not i feel i could be honored because a great composer invites me to a private party it's my choice to stay or not and of course i left it happened everywhere when bernard lefor invited me to his country house i arrived you know between two performances i had a free day and there was a big swimming pool but you know all these men and i said mr lefor you are the director
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of the festival you're going to be directing the paris opera i work there i think i cannot stay and he was very much surprised and so i said my drive will take you back to your hotel so i i could not be involved with the people i worked for it was not even what our personal sexual preference would be about it was simply me it was my own integrity that it made no sense to me you know it was maybe i was
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very young uh maybe that was a very light maturity that was budding at that time because men when they're 21 they're still kids so basically it took me a while to understand that i was just turning down offers which could have led to a very quick rise in the opera house but it made me very very uncomfortable and after two seasons i left paris you know so i i never felt okay with um the the certain um
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you could call it an an unwritten abusive behavior of the elite who you know pulled the triggers basically and when i when i turned down the biggest person of all a year later who was basically the head of all of the opera houses in france uh and and he said why are you making a problem i do i am the person i am the puppet master and that scared me away so basically a year later i had gone to germany i was not going to stay in paris so um
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that said i saw a lot of my younger colleagues go through those mazes and and playing the game there were some young women who were exceptionally talented dancers who could not become a ballerina because they did not play the game uh that's the same as you have in hollywood it's obvious where i i take more offense even is when one prepares them very very young and i mean under age 15
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you know so you see inevitably dancers in a studio are hardly wearing anything because you wear tights you know they're not wearing big corsages anymore like in the 19th century with big tutus that's not happening everybody is basically standing in in the lingerie department so um and there you have everything that could inspire or attract those who again are mostly the ones who make the decisions so um sometimes i know that parents were
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contacted and we will create a great career for your son or daughter and just let it off you know leave leave the girl the boy in our hands and very often the parents just blame believe it because it's a world they're on you they do not live in so um they probably think it's a great honor um i had the unfortunate uh big mouth that i had to talk about it which that's not that's not a very good thing to do when you start off your career but then much later thanks especially to
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to meeting some very good astrologers i understood that basically that was what had to happen i needed to be the tourist on stage and off stage to see how this world was run and um and i thought that a lot you know so to a certain extent all of the festivals i directed um everything that my you know not unimportant career abroad was geared to bring education and
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awareness and as you know better than many other of your colleagues um awareness is not what one preaches out there which we'd rather be following it all up right so um okay so uh now that's that's very good uh but i think that uh the fact that you turn these people down uh you must have seen certain things uh because there's a big push to out the whole pedophilia situation right now
16:03
as you know uh the dance world of course this is rampant and this is what you're speaking about it also when you turn it down it affected it did affect your career you did manage to have a career but it wasn't the career you would have had otherwise this is a photo of um the valley donkey shot okihote that was in um so as i was saying is that you had some some career turns that would pop
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probably not have happened had you gone along with the program uh which is a program of seduction basically yes yes yes you could call it seduction because one is seduced by just the fact that as a young man or woman you're going to be dancing a solo role or you leave nuns and nutcrack or the little prince or whatever it is so it starts very very young and um one i can see it with the young kids of course wherever i i was a guest artist and how did the children follow their teacher now if the teacher has
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great intent that's fantastic you know if the teacher is in a major school um very often they will follow what they've been told and one of the examples of the companies where i was you know didn't see it because i was actually well partly yes there was american ballet theater in 1979 um i was a guest teacher there and choreographer for the for the youth company which is called american valley theater repertory company and this was full of wonderful talented
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kids including susan jaffe who made a wonderful uh ballerina very very soon after and um i befriended a lot of them because my age level was maybe 10 years older only than than those who were 17 18 years old right so we would have a drink and they would talk and we would even go to studio 54 and and when you get in that round no i didn't have to be involved with them but obviously i knew from them what was going on and at one point i remember some of the guys
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in the company uh they were on their way to becoming soloists or principals and we went to a party where that was organized by i think was the president of the board and it wasn't all men only again so i didn't go there plus i was a guest teacher i was not going to be involved at all but it was obvious that um in order to push the career many of them seem to have thought that this was just the way to go you know and then the unfortunate thing what happened oh yeah you have a few pictures there that's um there's one
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from from sleeping beauty on the left and um yeah but um so um some of the of the the the kids were basically groomed and um when you had the school of american valley which is one of the great schools in the united states was one of the great schools under balanchine you know who was the famous choreographer uh he gave eventually the direction to a wonderful dancer one of his principal dancers peter martens well uh just a few years ago peter martens was
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ousted by the company for her first harassment of uh some of the the female dancers yeah so um i knew peter personally very very well in 1975 six he came to paris opera uh to dance with us he was very jovial very simpatico when i came to new york in 79 he was friendly he he helped me wherever i needed to give her just a call to get free tickets or anything he never
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made a hand on any of my friends or myself but then you heard that there were involvements with students you know so they they let the man go he was a great dancer he was a very good choreographer he led the ship in a way financially that had never been let new york city valley has all the possible grants that you can imagine and i felt very sorry to hear from his colleagues and the people who worked for him how he actually run the ship and that has a lot to do with the pressure one may say people
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in great positions need to uh find drugs to help them get through their lives um it's an odd thing to think that you you need to um uh lead i mean that like state here it's a ship because you have over 100 or 150 dancers working for you and then you have the staff so it's an enormous responsibility to bring in the millions of dollars to keep this going but is that an excuse to then need to cool off by getting involved with um young kids or
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your own dancers uh or is that a part of the growing up process that those people go through or with other words are the constructs you know so i always felt that many of the of the some of the great dances you know i mean i won't give names here because they had very dubious private lives noraev's private life was very well known he was one of the great artists of all time who must have had a minimum of 200 men per
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year you know he this is the way he functioned he needed to eat big steaks and he needed men after all of his performances and there were not the young guys that i can tell you he liked real guys so rudolph had nothing to do with young people he was inspired by them he pushed him in the balance but he had nothing to do with with with the kids so to say um but um that's not the the same with with you know the hollywood world the artist world from art from from any of the performing arts uh whether
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it's even the opera realm or or or the the musicians um it it seemed to be just a general thing that one has to uh go with the flow uh that they propose you and if not i'm not um okay i'm not unhappy that i said no because i always thought like well it's my choice if i fall in love with somebody that would be a completely different situation but i didn't feel bad that i didn't
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get more roles or because i always thought oh it's only a passage i need to get to another place to learn more in a different way you know so um i'm i'm not upset you didn't feel uh that that really limited you as as much as it could have or sounds as though it might have um but i do wonder uh you know of course passage of time i'm talking to you now many years later right so perhaps you might have had a different perspective at different
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points in your life for example if you went for a part and you didn't get the part and you knew why you see it wasn't about talent and you've told me other stories uh that are all also even when you go for jobs now there are issues um not necessarily that they want to seduce you although you know but um but you know we've talked about this uh in a certain sense you know too much um and and so you know maybe you can address that as well um in a minute
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first of all i want to bring up the situation that we have in hollywood because we've got a lot of it's kind of called the me too movement with a lot of uh the females that have been uh you know had to sort of be be approached by various people um and so on and and seduced and allowed themselves to be seduced or got into a compromised position by being invited to a hotel room uh for an audition or something like an
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audition or what you call a meetup and uh that would turn into something sexual uh and that they would kind of acquiesce either one because they had never learned how to stand up for themselves and fight back i always i always marvel at this because you know i had i worked in hollywood i did have approaches but i never i never like got seduced um in that way because i i was always a fighter i was always you
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know i was always the way i am now so but i hear these stories and there's some very um you know poignant uh stories on this on this level so you must have been aware of this it must have been something that you were party to even in uh maybe confidences of male and female dancers to where they simply they did progress in their career but they definitely had to uh had to go along with the program
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definitely and many of those especially ladies also dance at the white house you know so um i would almost say you've been invited at the white house uh before 2016. you'd wonder so um definitely i can tell you one brief story is is this a metaphor dance at the white house or that you're using or are do you mean literally that if they don't literally so if they were a dancer invited to dance at the white house they
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would have been who would have been propositioning them exactly the president or what well there there's always an advisor going you know who proposes and and some some ballerinas or some sopranos have come to the white house as a guest when they had a special dinner for another head of state or and there were special occasions including um the inauguration ball or you know where they do bring a a singer or a belly dancer or both for
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that matter and and through the grapevine i did find out that they didn't just come and sing or dance okay so um but um in in in a less so important way i remember when one of the big opera houses in in in germany the berlin uh opera house uh that house herbert von carrion who was one of the great conductors of all time so i had to audition um for a soloist position
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and the director who was a friend of my teacher came to hanover to see me dance a leading role and then he whined and dying me after and he said oh yes i'm going to give you this contract and let's have a last drink in my suite i already knew by then that the last drink in this suite was going to be not taking me to the to the contract room right at the contract not contact and um so um he closed the door he the drinks didn't even come on the table he just threw me on the bed and jumped on top of me and
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as i speak joan i i told him my baguette nick's come from jesus nothing will help from this so he stood up and he was very drunk i'll say that and he said well zen i think you're going to have to come and audition in berlin and so i just auditioned he offered me the contract and out of my own young ego i went to audition berlin he made me wait two hours in a studio walked in with a famous cargifer just to scare me off and then i did my solo work and then he said you're fine you'll get the
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contract and then we had dinner and everything was fine but i showed him i wasn't you couldn't buy me maybe at that moment many years later he invited me to teach and do two ballets for the berlin ballet so there was some kind of respect that came from that but at the same time i could have just you know one time only one time only you know and the contract comes in with an opening night of the bali gizelle swan lake maybe you know and so it just it did not work that would be a
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plus for me to be very honest um to put it bluntly there would be no excitement of somebody trying to do something to me that i don't want it you know i mean even i love good cakes if you want me to eat one and i'm full i'm not gonna have so um sure uh okay but it in terms of uh this this sort of i i call it kind of like the holly hollywoodization of the of the dance world but it's really been part of the dance world going back to the early 1900s maybe from the very very early
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days things that were completely assumed that would be part of this right that young young male or female dancers simply going along with that program and just look at some of the top dancers and assume that they actually you know were seduced basically um and and play you know played the game and that would be true of the actor actors and actresses uh the ones that came through uh through
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in the metoo movement um at least by the descriptions especially for the women i don't think we've heard as much from the men uh strangely but um not that they don't exist because i know they do um but the women's stories are always it's kind of the male female being overpowered getting in a situation where you can't physically defend yourself or in some form or fashion um that's usually the situation
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yeah and of course the people that work for them this is another thing they turn a blind blind eye or actually facilitate not unlike um you know uh epstein and um and and and what's her name i'm jordana blank um yes uh so you know just lane some people say yes so you know what i'm saying is that these people end up working together
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and this this has been demonstrated in movies now um i think there's a a story on apple tv there's a there's a series about this kind of thing and in some cases it can be quite damaging you apparently held your own for whatever reason uh perhaps a certain kind of upbringing self-respect or whatever one one might say do you think that that entered into it because i'm always concerned when i hear uh
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various actresses talking about how completely defenseless they felt yes i think one of the things my dad used to say because i remember my mom would every month buy a few little um tickets for the lottery yeah and my dad would say yeah that's not gonna happen we have to work for what we earn we have to work and i guess this is one of those things that stays with you so i never thought it was going to come for free i had to work and i worked hard
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so um it's true that the performing arts world um is full of well-meaning talented people who um do not get um you know a chance at the oscars because they did not you know one says if you get to the oscars the nominations alone it mostly means you've already been a part of their story well i i personally knew alan bates he was nominated but never won an oscar yeah and i know very
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well allen did not buy into hollywood and he stayed in england and he did his thing and he ended up being you know a gay man hidden in you know but he he had a wonderful uh life uh uh with with uh the john curry the the ice kid who who basically passed away so there's a there's a an exception on the rule there are people but then of course they don't get that one little statue you know and it's very funny that we've been influenced tremendously by the idea of winning
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an oscar and anime a grammy this it does always like weird competition in this country which there is a basically a spock for everyone with talent unfortunately that hasn't been the case because um it it again the work for me it feels it's a con construct in that construct of performing arts we we live for creating an illusion which can be wonderful i love a good movie i love a good play when it's live it's even
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better um to say great actors on stage pulling their guts out it's just totally amazing that that the human being has that facility but to go to that extent of being maybe a male strip or somebody of that that level of acting um is that person dissociated to the extent that one can forget who one is and then you go into mind control situations uh where where then you find out how
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one can build up so many different personality drawers because one has been abused since childhood or very early babyhood even to the extent that um and of course you you know about all these uh particular um uh uh people who might control um uh lady i forgot her name now um one was called wilder maybe and the other lady who wrote to the book arizona wild wilder
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yeah um there there are several um so okay so with that in mind because i wanted to touch on that subject can we also talk about why because i think it's it's very interesting it's kind of like another side of the story that has to do with um it's a little more a political thing i think using political in a in a larger sense that if you know too much in any of these certain professions and you wish
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to be at the top you're um you're not encouraged because you you've actually had situations where you've been turned down um but it's politics right again it's not playing the game in the political sense in this in this case where you're not yeah you're not an easy yes man right or you know too much any any thoughts could you share some of that absolutely i mean we do live in a masonic world and it's
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not only the masons of course who who who rule but most of all the the so-called great leaders of all the countries have to have a a high highly placed membership card i'll put it this way and i know i thought this in belgium because at one point um my my friends were all famous musicians singers dancers and they joined me on an on the list to create a school of the arts in my country in belgium and we were really on
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a good track we had wonderful um great artists coming basically to support us for like a hundred dollars a day in expenses to teach classes during three to six weeks summer courses i mean we were close to create something unique in europe and that was in belgium belgium has the european parliament has european commission you know they would have been amazing we could have received grants from everywhere because it was a good goal well we almost made it and there was always something that just happened
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to to go wrong uh and then little by little i started to realize well you know i am not a mason i am i'm i'm swimming in the middle of a political world where i would go to try and speak to the um a minister of culture and his chief of cabinet would receive me and then it would take another year before then i finally would speak to the woman but that particular woman was all for the projects that i i proposed which was all education bound and a different way of educating young artists um and before
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you know two months later she was ousted you know and i kept thinking it was very strange when i did the very big festival for tibetan children and artists in exile in the north of india and i i just i called up i took me a year to organize it uh some of the greatest musicians and dancers and they all came for free to help me we had a two-week festival called pact which was peace through art for children today and um we had about 55 performances
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and workshop in two weeks with the three-dimensional stage with the film on tibet um and tibetan children and this was all about bringing awareness he was a humongous public and and um press in your success with the press but um two months before my father passed away my mother had to go to the hospital and i felt bombarded from all sides when the belgian government we drew its grants
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and one could have said well the day after your festival finished the prime minister and the king are going to china to make business deals that was too little at an example they just thought i would never succeed in doing something because i believe in a higher in a higher universal force that's going to help me support because my intent is genuine and and it takes a lot to bring me down at the same time i saw the things coming down every day something happened and i i could not believe how difficult it
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became just to do something good and i do know that some people in the political world now i know of course i didn't know it right then um were watching and what was stunning is that the press was with me i still don't get that because the press usually is bogged but there is something oh there was something in the belgian press the flemish you know the dutch speaking and the french-speaking press that seemed to defend that this needed to happen and and it was so well written up and um
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but after that it became more and more difficult uh and then later on i tried one more time with the royal ball of flamis but at one point i had been the choreographer uh to make a proposition and then i found out a lot of ugly things basically they're all political and i i knew i couldn't win it but i i wrote on blogs i attacked the the minister of culture for it um he the minister of culture came from a very odd background because he was the
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director for the belgian beer and all of a sudden he becomes you know the head of culture you know so these things that happen and i kept researching it it's my scorpio rising i need to know why these things are happening and then i found out a lot of irregularities his right hand was also the president of the organization for a specific choreographer who then became the director so everything worked hand in hand and they were all masonically linked that i knew for a fact i knew that right
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um i think wednesday about that can you tell us uh what about this story you told me uh that i thought was really funny uh but uh you know funny in a not so laugh out loud way but uh where you said uh i think it was during the tibetan was it the pet tibetan show it but it was in belgium i thought yes um and and then you went to to open the door in the morning of the performance yes yes that is absolutely that was like you know because people a lot of times i
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think that people don't realize when we're talking politics we're also talking um sort of in the etheric world there is you know the dark magicians are working in these other ways to screw up screw with us okay so it's and and in my world like this world we're doing right now for example they can mess with your technology but then they can also come into the on the etheric level and and mess with you in in that way so this locked door is is is a very great great
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story in that it is funny it was the opening day so dirty tibetans a national costume are to walk into the town hall with a very aristocratic uh the nickname escapes me now mayor who needs to give a speech walk with them to the royal opera house through the city and then open the doors after you know a big musical uh introduction by the tibetans and the doors open and the first performance starts well i we arrived at the town
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hall and no no a mayor so i stormed to the halls we are here with the tibetans where's the mayor where's the mayor but finally somebody i mean i i spoke so loud that finally the man comes out of his office oh we're so sorry we completely forgot there's an agenda there's an agenda written stamped by the mayor's office that that day you come at 11 am in the morning the mayor addresses then they walk and the whole thing because you can't the streets were no traffic you know with the police all
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this was said because you can't do it it has to be official so the streets were open we were able to walk only the the mayor wasn't available all of a sudden so he came and he apologized in english that something terrible happened in the government he had to attend and he couldn't and he wished us all well so he disappeared so we walked to the city we came came at the opera house the audience was there we the tibetans did that show and of course and meanwhile i kind of thought i wonder if something else is behind all this so i go back and we can't open the front doors
42:09
so fortunately this is what i believe in this benevolent universe i found the concierge and she said i've got a second team you wait so she ran with me from the inside and we just opened the doors like 10 minutes before the show you know and the people came in and apparently that that caused such a big uber at the direction because since it was in the month of august the world opera house is officially closed so we had the written organization to
42:40
come and do two weeks of shows at the opera house so they but it takes an organization to do this so again i believe in the benevolent universe this had to happen the people came in you know so somehow as opposed to the maybe the more you know what you would say the light side counters yes hunter's situation yes for sure and and you know all of us would would say that that is is definitely operational uh so so it's not just the dark it actually
43:12
is balanced by the light um is there anything else that uh before i you know because i know we we don't want to talk all day here but um even though it might be fun uh i i do want to talk about your book and you've got another book and there was you did get notice on your first book uh which as i recall is a book of poetry um correct and uh and and then now you have your new book so i want to allow us to at least touch on both of those and why why you wrote actually both the
43:43
books so so why don't you talk about that yes that's the first that's that's the the poetry um i think it's a moment in life where my father had passed away where i came out of the tibetan situation i i needed to be off and through a long story short of one of my friends she thought why don't you come to to florence and um and just this happened i started writing i bought one of those leather covered you know um
44:14
books where you can write in all paper and it was so inspiring and i would sit down with the cappuccino and i would start writing and just things would come and it was it came easy it was fun um it happened to once the book was ready it helped a an organization for dyslexia which actually again it must be old karma linked to unesco and the patron is um is a princess uh she's married to the
44:46
grand duke liechtenstein and and now she she promoted this performance to half of the court to sit in the broad conservatory and the story goes that there's a lot of erotic poems in here and so she comes backstage in the intermission and she said could you be so would you be so kind to to send 10 books uh to them to the liechtenstein embassy because i want to bring it to my aunt queen fabiola and i went are you sure queen fabiola
45:16
because she's always dei she's very vatican oriented and she's oh no no she likes a good boy so that was very interesting i thought but um yeah it was a i think it's because it was the first thing i was not the first book i wrote i didn't like the first one i wrote was a biography so i just didn't like it i thought why would i have to tell all the stories that other people have already written about you know so um but um but the poetry has some kind of um
45:47
it has real stories in disguise i'm like there's one that i wrote on bill gates and i had no clue about bill gates then and and this is this is him this is a point about him and and um it it says what's going on that there were things all about the environment about the war about uh relationships and um so i guess it was just an um maybe my my temporary higher expression of of things that i felt yeah okay but now you
46:18
you started i if i don't tell me correct me it was actually a second book where you went to florence and wrote right right so we kind of broke off in the middle and and talked about the poetry but yes yes that's okay um so let's go back to the your most recent book uh the medici uh what you call momentum memento so yes lovely cover there and uh so so i am curious is this a past life do you
46:50
think that that it came so easily yes and and and i apologize because i typically gemini expanding on my on the first book but um yet it was while i was working on the poetry and i i would sometimes take the bus up to fiesole and mayano and they have this lovely little canteen like meals and it's just wonderful and one day i just walked up it was lovely weather and suddenly i i froze because i saw myself riding a horse and i mean i you know i had been a buddhist for many years i had done so
47:22
much research on all kinds of ways of life uh that would take me out of the illusion and then and then i see myself riding on a horse i ran behind myself and i landed of course there was no look on the horse but i landed at the gate of the the medici um uh fiercely villa and then a long story short i i ended up getting the authorization to go and visit so i sat in the in the in that park uh beautiful view on on the city
47:54
and it felt like i know this place and i started writing a new um a new story and that became the medici memento i remember meditating one one day and i said it it feels someone wants me to tell you a story and i will do that as long as it's honest and as long as you get out when it's finished i don't want any debris carry on my shoulders from any whatever lifetime and it felt very familiar
48:25
when i um i studied and that was in all the museums and all the villas of the medici so everything that's in the book about the renaissance spirit the 1473 timeline israel and um i discovered a letter that pierre gotozo the father of lorenzo and juliana de medici wrote to a friend the day of the birth of his son juliana his second son and um long story short the compatibility of the two charts my
48:56
own and his i was like wow and i had been told many times i had died in another lifetime with daggers in my back and of course the famous uh patsy conspiracy where juliano dies with 17 times the dagger hit him in his back people had met me and they said oh i just know one person once gave me a book he said this is our story and it was about the medici killing uh so that i never really thought it was that you
49:25
know important i was a big a was a follower but um i studied a lot the work of barbara martinez i did a lot of workshops with her at some point all right we should talk about that so so barbara messini uh you know she's all about the pleiadians and so why don't you set that up a bit because and this is a wonderful you know past life reference that you've got there and i think that's great because a lot of authors i don't know people pay attention this i do um a lot of
49:57
wonderful books are written that are actually past life memories that the past comes in to the author who ends up writing it uh they don't reveal that this is a past life most the time of their own uh or their recall but that's actually what influences them so in this case that was the case with you in this particular book yes but to make the transition to barbara can you do that because i think that would be very interesting to people yeah i guess barbara uh
50:27
with all my respect and gratitude she was one of my teachers because when i met her a year i the year i lived in santa fe new mexico which was like in 1993 and i went to a few of her workshops it was exceptional um sometimes in the workshop that i she would be in a channeling mode and and she would or the pleiadians that she channeled would say like oh we see the front row some familiar faces from the
50:58
medici period you know and i thought what god what is that coming from so it was it was an an amazing journey that i was a lot fortunate to follow through her writings through her workshops because um basically what barbara did is she brought out ancient information in her books and in her exercises because they do the plea agents propose healing exercises she always said that she never knew who they
51:29
really were you know that basically they they came out uh in and brought information that she then communicated uh in the workshops the the audience was able to ask questions uh which was always very interesting i think she's one of the major american teachers to her books uh of the big wake-up call which is you know the a harmonic conversion of a 1987 88 period where all the planets align and i think
52:01
for me it's a proof that when one is one has in one's program to wake up it's like there's hardly any way not to do it or that something in your own system is going to react like you got to do this because you signed up for doing this and um i think it was really the first year where um i thought miracles were actually happening whatever i would do with my career everything worked but the intent was um
52:33
was to do you know to do something good um yeah martinak is is is definitely one of the of my most um important influences and i hope you you get to interview her because she's fascinating lady okay uh so so did you learn anything yourself about uh your own interactions with ets during that time uh did you have any pleiadian uh contacts that sort of thing yeah there there were moments where um
53:04
because they translated in in indigo light they would say that you know the beings were indigo light and obviously transparent not like in 3d version and i remember the very first big workshop we had uh in santa fe new mexico my my bedroom at the hotel was like was all blue and i just and i was so steady i would say oh yeah go go go go go because i knew nothing i said come on play with me yeah i want to know you know but that changed when we would go like she took
53:36
us or should we had a small group we went to to uh the giza plateau and when we landed in the in the pyramid the great pyramid there was there were a lot of films going backwards and i do believe that those energy vortexes activate parts of ourselves so we would remember that we did have a certain power whether or not we were in a situation where we abused that power or we were being
54:07
abused in my case i will say that on all of those vortexes i visited um even in england glastonbury and and you name it and um something has always happened and um i think that the program the human program as a soul is um is never free from any possibilities you know i i think at the end um you learn so much from from everything including what not to do because sometimes you just do things you shouldn't be doing
54:37
so you would understand what that feels like you know so um and the stupid example would be definitely for me to say well i certainly did not have easy hips so i was not going to be pulling my leg in splits because it would kill my hips and i would not be dancing so i left the the leg less high than everybody else so at least i could jump yeah so i compromised for one but finding out that the moment i started going like oh no we didn't want to do this you know so um and
55:09
that's a very silly example because it's it's very um innocent um i i can i say i would definitely not approve of any sexual abuse and and any killings but sometimes i guess the characters in our world journey around us do and they show us and therefore we remember eventually and we also don't want it i would not be a priest nor would i be a soldier and i told my parents when i was four years old
55:40
i wasn't going to be i like the singing so i love being in church because i got to sing when that was finished i was discovered with james bond in church which was not appreciated by my father so then i left the shirt you know so i think that everything we we um we accumulate is based on experiences and and of transmissions and people like the marciniaks out there or the shakespeares for that matter uh bring out information uh that is
56:10
probably historically correct or adapted or um are inspiring for us to want to know more very nicely said okay uh so in in terms of uh what's going on right now and and perhaps some wrap up comments that you'd like to make you know and i think people have gotten to know you a bit uh and one thing you are very sort of focused on at this time is uh you not only have been teaching of
56:41
course ballet but you're also very concerned with the health of the dancer so uh perhaps you can talk a little bit about your your forays into that world um and and then we could wrap this up okay well thank you um yes i developed a program called mbac which means move body aware connect where i use some of the ancient techniques you know like qigong and tai chi and yoga and the the work at the gyrotonic
57:12
and the breeding i kind of like to put a lot of movement in so people don't feel they have to hold yoga positions it's very good to hold them but sometimes you know not everybody is ready for that i use the work of yamuna zeke in new york with the footsavers and the yamuna balls which helps dances tremendously which will help any human being tremendously for that matter and it's all geared when i do the workshops one-to-one or in small groups
57:43
um to basically wake yourself up to how you can age gracefully and and feel at ease with your body and of course that includes you know the the wonderful world of homeopathy of of uh supplements from nature uh can you eat from your garden great of course make sure you cover it a bit now because things keep falling out in the sky no too so i think once health is so important because um the body is the cathedral in which the soul is housed so how could we not yeah
58:15
so and actually in a funny way all of the things we've talked about are in the medici memento the mind control is in it the travel the time travel story of course is in it and then there's a lot of the evil political world hidden in it the big pharma it's all kind of mixed into it you know so i i presume that i know what i think of it the book is is um it's a mini resume of a lot of things there's even ballet in it you know so it's it's kind of hey uh well just
58:46
because you touched on it i um i'm wondering if uh the man who who you might have been in the past um forget it he had his name in the medici world um sorry juliano de medici okay so uh that he ended up with these you said 17 knives in the back yeah he got stabbed 17 times why that sounds ritualistic so do you know why that happened well um his brother was to be they were
59:19
both supposed to be killed lorenzo dominici who is the magnificent they called him because he had the greatest leaders capacity uh that had ever seen on a young man because this is before he turned 21 he was already negotiating for his family and the medici were of course bankers you know so he did have an approach where he would give the money also for the great artists like the michelangelo's and the da vinci's you know they're all in and also in the book
59:48
so um but um giuliano and his brother were going to church and a famous family called the patsy p a double z i had planned with the vatican to kill them because they thought the only way to finish with a rain that's being built up little by little internationally actually and so um but again there was like a higher force and there was a delay uh lorenzo came to too late uh um it
01:00:20
happened to be that giuliani was kind of a bit sick because they all had to go out in that in those in those days many families had to go and though he was very young so he was delayed and he was on his way and they found out that the two brothers weren't together but they killed him first and because of that actually um giuliano and other friends were able to close up that part of the cathedral where they were then hiding but giuliano had been killed
01:00:51
and the instant reaction that came from you know he was a huge leader he didn't wait for a trial he had them all caught and hung after having tortured them hung from the town hall la signoria okay lorenzo in other words the brother yes lorenzo did that but um yeah and um these were cruel times you know um the renaissance was of course amazing for its artistic development and the education
01:01:22
and um it was also a period where it felt very much that women were playing not even the second violet they would they only be the ones to be coming when we're at court when we had to negotiate when you bring in your beautiful wife because she has given you many children and they had very little to say you know so um one thing that you isn't clear about what you just said was uh you said the vatican and the group that they hired
01:01:55
went kill the brother so why it's still not clear why did why did the vatican want to kill the brother or both of them actually why did they vatican what was it they were doing that was so um you know against the vatican basically lorenzo was going to be more of a unifying force for all the states of italy and of course the vatican state was always the vatican state and it still is today um but he had the good
01:02:25
connection with the king of naples so the king of naples was supporting him uh the the families in um milano were supporting him the venetians were going to be supporting him and they were not going to have wars the vatican wanted the war because they wanted the money they also the vatican started the crusades so um so basically he was going he was already going against them you know and so they saw a very young man with tremendous power and addiction
01:02:57
and general culture and he knew roman and latin and he had polizziano next to him who who spoke perfect uh latin um he could basically negotiate with the devil and they saw that kind of power therefore they wanted to kill him and since they didn't kill him and the time that he developed i mean that was this was the golden age for italy you know so um but and it's a story that's frequent that you'll find in england or in many
01:03:28
other countries under elizabeth first and you know so uh russia you know but so the brother uh didn't have these particular oratory skills necessarily is what you're saying but he was still killed yes because it was better if if lorenzo would have because the brother was kind of like the brad pitt of the italy you know like everybody adored he was so handsome and all the women wanted him and you know he was going to be if his brother would have died he would have taken over even though giuliano was not really interested in power because they wanted
01:03:59
him as a cardinal at the at the vatican so each great family famous family had a representative in the vatican to play the political games and giuliani wasn't interested he actually had a son with the i think the wife of of vespucci so and that son many many years later became actually a cardinal and became the pope leo uh i think his name was leo so um and um yeah
01:04:30
i think that the the dark period uh of of the 1470s uh in in florence were also very prolific because florence was known for homosexuality but hidden and there was a very bad reputation for you came from florence and you would journey to germany for example belgium or uh and and do business and and they they they would say oh you must be gay right you come from florence so it was i mean i
01:05:02
didn't call it gay obviously yeah but um there were a lot of public hidden stories and the medici family uh covered them up because they had a lot of that i mean leonardo da vinci was gay um uh polizziano of course and these people were brought up very very young i mean obviously very often one does know as a teenager what one's choice may be but many were also again in a situation of abuse again because of the of the the
01:05:33
elder and the rich elite yeah and that was covered up and i found a book in italian that shows the literally the from the town hall they have there was it was called the offices of the night they made notes of who was found at that tree in that street in that alley and put in jail but then two minutes later they were out of jail because there was a higher protection coming in yeah so um so it's a very fascinating period and and in the book i think it's very
01:06:05
parallel in a way to all the stuff that goes on in this particular case in geneva washington which is the whole mind control thing which you know only too well yeah so okay very interesting all right so this is a rather a different kind of an interview i hope that people appreciate it and uh you've been very eloquent with uh conveying the uh sort of various worlds that you've been part of so thank you very much and um
01:06:36
you know take care and keep us posted as to where you go and and your travels as i know you will thank you very much okay bye bye bye you

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