ADA LOVELACE | La vida de la primera PROGRAMADORA de la historia | Biografía documental en español

ADA LOVELACE | La vida de la primera PROGRAMADORA de la historia | Biografía documental en español

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Language: English

Type: Human

Number of phrases: 88

Number of words: 1029

Number of symbols: 5144

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Welcome, curious minds! Do you know the story of Ada Lovelace, the daughter of Lord Byron who is considered the first programmer in the history of computing? To understand the figure of Ada Lovelace first we have to talk about her parents: the famous British poet lord Byron and Anna Isabella Noel Byron, better known like Lady Byron. His mother belonged to a noble family and had received a very careful education. Her father, Sir Ralph Milbanke, was famous for his works for the poor and against slavery, a concern for the disadvantaged that Anna Isabella inherited. Trained in literature, philosophy and science, which would be Ada Lovelace's mother was especially interested in astronomy and mathematics. She met Lord Byron in 1812 and married him in January 1815, although the marriage started to go wrong immediately. The poet described his relationship with these words: "We are two parallel lines extending
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side by side to infinity but destined to never meet." At the end of that same year, on 10 December 1815, in London, their only daughter was born, Augusta Ada Byron. Only a month later, after know that her husband was unfaithful to her, Anna Isabella abandoned him and got the divorce with the help of her parents. Byron left England that same year and never came back. He would die in Greece when she was eight years old. Ada Byron therefore did not receive from her father more influence than that of his last name, and her mother undertook to promote her interest by mathematics and logic with the hope that those matters prevent her daughter from developing the unpredictable and temperamental character of her father. Unfortunately, it was not usual in the time that women studied math and science but from first years, and throughout her life, Ada Lovelace had very good tutors, like the Scottish astronomer and mathematician
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Mary Somerville who was one of the first women to be part of the Royal Astronomical Society of London. Somerville, as a paradigm of pioneering scientist woman, exercised a very important influence on Ada's life. At 11 years old, Lovelace's dream was to build a flying machine and for a long time she studied the anatomy of birds to try to discover the correct ratio between wings and body that allowed birds to fly, and drew sketches of her project. In early 1829, when she was 13 years old, suffered a serious illness, probably measles, which paralyzed her legs for three years. She spent all that convalescence time to delve into her studies. When she was 18 years old began to attend the parties of London high society and in one of them Mary Somerville introduced her to the English mathematician Charles Babbage, who shared with her a fondness for mechanical devices. Back then Babbage was 44 years old and was developing the differential engine,
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a mechanical calculator that fascinated Ada. The two became very close and they kept abundant correspondence. In 1835 she met a very influential aristocrat, William King-Noel, whom she married shortly after and with whom she had three children. When her husband received the title of Earl of Lovelace, Ada stepped to sign always like Ada Lovelace, the name with we know her today. From 1841 Ada began to collaborate with Babbage in his projects, among which highlighted the new idea of ​​the mathematician, which he called the analytical engine, a much more advanced and complex version of the differential engine. At that time a silk loom had become popular invented by french Joseph Marie Jacquard who used punch cards for knitting patterns on the fabric so that even the most inexperienced were able to weave designs complex. From that system,
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it occurred to Babbage that he could create a machine like the Jacquard loom, but applied to numbers, a wit to obey a series of instructions written on the punch cards, that is, a computer. That machine was never built, but it laid the foundation for what a century later would become the computing. When Babbage lectured about his new project at the University of Turin, a young engineer named Luigi Menabrea, who would later come to become prime minister of Italy, transcribed that talk in French and a friend of Babbage commissioned Ada to translate it into English. Ada not only the translated, but, animated by Babbage himself, added her own notes, which tripled the original text in length. That work was published in September 1843 and Ada signed it with her initials: AAL. In the last of those long notes that she had added, ordered from A to G,
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she had described an algorithm whereby the analytical engine could compute Bernoulli numbers. Ada had written the first program for a computer in the history. Furthermore, in her notes she predicted that the applications of that machine would go far beyond simple mathematicians calculations, practical applications Babbage had not seen. Ada became a visionary of the computing. There is some controversy about Ada Lovelace's achievements. Some experts argue that while it's true that she predicted the future capabilities of computers, it is not so clear that it was the first in writing a computer program or that her contributions to the work of Babbage was so momentous. However, there are also many experts who think otherwise because, in addition, no one but her saw the great potential from Babbage's machine. And what nobody can deny, of course, is that she was a very relevant female figure in the science that, in addition to his scientific contributions, helped to bring down many
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biases about large intellectual capacity of women in the academic field. Ada Lovelace passed away from uterine cancer on November 27, 1852. He was only 36 years old. Carrying out her will, they buried her by her father's grave, Lord Byron, in the church of Santa María Magdalena from Hucknall in Nottinghamshire. And you? What do you think of Ada Lovelace's story? I would like you to said us below, in the comments. And if you want to know more interesting stories, subscribe to my channel. Thanks a lot for being there! See you in the next video, curious minds!

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